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RVA Legends — Edmund Randolph House

A look into the history of Richmond places and people that have disappeared from our landscape.

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1002 Capitol Street
Built, between 1800 – 1802
Demolished, 1884

The home of Edmund Randolph, which stood in the middle of the block where the City Hall now is, was built either in 1800 or in 1802—there is evidence to support both dates. Randolph owned the whole square, and in 1798 he was occupying both a wooden house on this lot that faced Broad Street and a house belonging to Samuel McCraw on the northeast corner of Broad and Eleventh Streets. Probably he used one as his home and the other as his office.

[HOR] — Insurance Policy of 1803

To sum up briefly the career of Edmund Randolph we can do no better than to quote the inscription on his monument at Old Chapel, Clarke County:

Edmund Randolph, born Tazewell Hall, Williamsburg, August 10, 1753
Died Carter Hall, near Millwood, September 13, 1813.
Aide de camp to Washington 1775
First Attorney General of Virginia 1776
Member of the Continental Congress 1779
Governor of Virginia 1786
Grand Master of Masons in Virginia 1786
Member of the Constitutional Convention 1787
First Attorney General of the United States 1789
Secretary of State of the United States 1794

This brilliant record came to a sad close when, in 1795, Randolph was accused of improperly communicating to the French Ambassador, Fauchet, the views of the United States government. Randolph immediately resigned and returned from Philadelphia to “Spring Farm,’’ near Richmond. His disgrace ironically meant wealth after poverty, for he had never received more than $3500 a year in public office, and on returning to Richmond he took up a lucrative private practice as a lawyer. Finding the pressure of business too great for him to live out of the city, he moved to town. His most famous case during these years in Richmond was the defense of Aaron Burr in 1807, which he led, assisted by John Wickham.

(LOC) — Beers Illustrated Atlas of the Cities of Richmond & Manchester, 1877 — Plate K

Although his wife was severe and strait-laced, he was devoted to her. On returning from her grave (in March, 1810) he went to call on his friend Dr. Adams and at his house was paralyzed. After this illness he evidently rented either all or a part of his house to Louis H. Girardin, who advertised in July of that year that he would open a school “in the house of Mr. E. Randolph near the Capitol” on September 1st. Randolph may have continued to occupy a part of the house, as he advertised on October 19 that on November 1 he would begin the lectures on the Theory and Practice of Law announced before his illness, and he gives no other address than the one which must have been familiar to his readers. In 1812 Mr. and Mrs. Gorlier of Norfolk advertised a French Boarding School for Young Ladies in the house recently vacated by Girardin.

April 2016 — 1002 Capitol Street today

The following year, while Edmund Randolph was visiting his wife’s relatives, the Burwells, at Carter Hall in Clarke County, he died, and was buried in an unmarked grave at the Old Chapel. In 1814 the Richmond house was sold by his daughters, and the following year it was purchased by Robert Greenhow. Robert Greenhow died in 1840 at his son’s home in Washington. In 1846 his heirs sold the Randolph house to Valentine and Breedon, who had bought most of the square west of this one. In 1851 the lot, by then reduced to sixty-two feet (the house was fifty-five feet in length), was sold to Hugh Fry of the firm of Hugh W. Fry and Sons, Grocers and Commission Merchants. Mr. Fry added a long wing on the east end, terminating in a brick office on Broad Street, which he rented to Claudius Crozet. In 1872 the house was bought by a trustee for Mrs. Tupper, wife of the Reverend H. A. Tupper, secretary of the Baptist Foreign Mission Board. Dr. Tupper lived there as late as 1881, according to the directories. In 1883 the lot was purchased by the City in order to erect a new City Hall, and by July, 1884 the square that had once held the old City Hall, the First Presbyterian Church, and the home of Edmund Randolph was “bare of buildings.” [HOR]


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Bookbinder’s Brings you Mac & Cheese on Another Level with BIGWIFE’S Pop-Up

This isn’t your typical mom’s mac & cheese. If your mom makes mac & cheese like this we would like to be adopted.

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Old Original Bookbinder’s Seafood & Steakhouse has launched a new experimental pop-up concept focusing exclusively on macaroni and cheese. BIGWIFE’S Mac & Cheese is operating for delivery and carryout from the Bookbinder’s kitchen.

The inventive menu includes creative spins like Buffalo Mac with spicy chicken and gorgonzola cheese; Little Figgy Mac with goat cheese, ham and fig; Mac Lorraine with bacon, scallions, and gruyere; and Greek Wedding Mac with tomato, olive, artichokes, pepperoncini and feta. Any mac can be made gluten free.

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Old Original Bookbinder’s is located at 2306 E Cary Street, Richmond, VA 23223.

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City of Richmond declares State of Emergency due to “credible threats” related to planned protests

The city’s declaration opens up funds for emergency use and was voted into effect unanimously by City Council Monday evening.

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The City of Richmond and Mayor Levar Stoney’s administration has declared a State of Emergency for the city due to what officials call “credible threats” of violence related to planned protests leading up to President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration on January 20th.

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The city’s declaration opens up funds for emergency use and was voted into effect unanimously by City Council Monday evening.

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Family of local freight and transportation company makes $2 million donation to children’s hospital construction project

The Children’s Hospital Foundation’s matching campaign effectively will double the gift to $4 million.

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A local freight and transportation provider has made a major gift towards the construction of the forthcoming Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU expansion. In addition to the company’s gift of $150,000, Estes family members committed $1.85 million to support the Wonder Tower, the new home for Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU’s inpatient, emergency, and trauma services.

The two donations from Estes Express Lines and the Estes family were matched by the Children’s Hospital Foundation, maximizing the total investment in the Wonder Tower to $4 million. As part of the capital campaign to raise $100 million, the foundation is matching the first $25 million in gifts from the community.

“The support of Estes Express Lines and the Estes family is extremely meaningful. We’re grateful they’ve added their voice and support to our mission to build a world-class pediatric hospital in Richmond,” said Lauren Moore, president and chief executive officer of Children’s Hospital Foundation. “They’re truly a values-focused company and family, and their gifts reflect the importance they place on protecting children and their childhoods.”

“We are a family-owned business that’s had the honor of working with thousands of Richmond-area families for nearly 90 years,” said Rob Estes, president and CEO of Estes Express Lines. “Children deserve the best possible medical care when they need it, and we’re proud to support Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, as a company, and as a family.”

As part of the donation, some areas of the Wonder Tower will be named in honor of Estes, including the hospital’s loading dock, a nod to their work as a freight carrier business. The gift includes additional recognition of the family’s generosity throughout the building.

Once complete in spring 2023, the Wonder Tower will bring world-class pediatric facilities to Central Virginia. Located in downtown Richmond, the 16-story tower will be home to CHoR’s Level 1 pediatric trauma center, emergency room, inpatient units, new operating rooms, increased imaging capacity, and family amenities — all in an environment created just for kids and their loved ones.

“The children’s tower is being built for and by our community thanks to generous friends like the Estes,” said Elias Neujahr, CEO of CHoR. “It will be a beacon of hope for kids and families across the Commonwealth while helping us attract and retain top talent so our children have access to be the best care, close to home.”

In 2021, Estes Express Lines will celebrate its 90th anniversary as CHoR finishes its centennial year. “Let’s all come together to support the Wonder Tower, a special place where all families and children can receive exceptional pediatric care, right here in Richmond,” said Estes.

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