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West End

Sheltering Arms names Chief Medical Officer for forthcoming facility in Short Pump

Sheltering Arms Institute, a collaboration with VCU Health, announced this week the appointment of Richard Kunz, MD as chief medical officer. Kunz currently serves as an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the VCU School of Medicine. He is also the medical transitional team leader on the Sheltering Arms Institute project.

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Sheltering Arms Institute, a collaboration with VCU Health, announced this week the appointment of Richard Kunz, MD as chief medical officer. Kunz currently serves as an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the VCU School of Medicine. He is also the medical transitional team leader on the Sheltering Arms Institute project.

Kunz earned his bachelor of science in psychobiology and a master’s degree in behavioral neuroscience from the University of Southern California. Additionally, he holds his doctorate of medicine from Virginia Commonwealth University, where he completed a clinical fellowship in brain injury rehabilitation.

“We are confident that Dr. Kunz will successfully lead the continued development of a transdisciplinary rehabilitation team that delivers on our vision to reinvent rehabilitation for a life beyond limits,” said Alan Lombardo, CEO of Sheltering Arms Institute. “His leadership experience in medicine, hospital operations, and administration will be valuable assets. Additionally, his enthusiasm for advancing person-centered care and elevating the quality of rehabilitation care will play a leading role for the organization.”

Scheduled to open summer 2020, the new rehabilitation facility situated on 46 acres in the West Creek Medical Park off Broad Street Road, just east of the state Route 288 interchange in Goochland County. The joint venture combines the strengths of both organizations to provide exceptional care for individuals who have survived strokes, spinal cord injuries or brain injuries, as well as those in need of general rehabilitation for various neurological diseases and disorders.

Sheltering Arms and VCU Health will consolidate several of their locations to create one 114-bed hospital. Sheltering Arms Institute will combine 68 beds from Sheltering Arms’ two inpatient hospitals, located in Midlothian and Mechanicsville, with 46 beds from VCU Medical Center located in downtown Richmond. All outpatient services for both organizations will operate separately for now and into the foreseeable future.

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Arts & Entertainment

PHOTOS: Circle Center Adult Day Services unveils massive new mural

Richmond-based artist Nico Cathcart designed and painted the 75-foot wide mural.

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Local adult services provider Circle Center Adult Day Services will be unveiling an unprecedented work of art to its supporters on Wednesday, December 7th at 8:30 a.m.

Richmond-based artist Nico Cathcart designed and painted the 75’ wide by 18’ tall mural on Circle Center’s building at 4900 West Marshall Street near Willow Lawn. The mural features four people who attend Circle Center.

“It’s simply breathtaking in its size and in how well Nico captured the personalities of Mike, Elizabeth, Banoo, and Winston,” says Heather Turbyne-Pollard, Circle Center’s CEO. Nico collaborated with local artist and photographer Caroline Shelnut to bring her concept to life.

“Once I learned about Circle Center and witnessed the dignity and respect with which they treat everyone who attends their programs, I was inspired,” says Nico. “I reached out to Caroline because of her recent photography series.”

Caroline Shelnut, Creative Arts Coordinator for Hermitage Richmond, has taken over 30 Renaissance-inspired photographs of the residents with whom she works. “What I love about Renaissance art is that it features people of all ages,” said Caroline. She went on to say, “Whenever I photograph older adults, I want them to see themselves the way that I see them, as wonderful, valuable, and beautiful human beings.”

Circle Center’s unveiling will start at 8:30 a.m. on December 7th, rain or shine, and will include Nico signing the mural. In addition, Heather Turbyne-Pollard will interview Nico and Caroline about what Nico calls the “Age and Grace” mural. The four Circle Center participants who served as models will also be in attendance.

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Education

University of Richmond awarded $625K HHMI grant to study barriers to student inclusivity

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute has awarded the University of Richmond a $625K grant that will support efforts to create an inclusive experience for students and enhance student belonging.

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The Howard Hughes Medical Institute has awarded the University of Richmond a $625K grant that will support efforts to create an inclusive experience for students and enhance student belonging.

The HHMI Inclusive Excellence 3 grant is a six-year program and will be led by biology professor Angie Hilliker, who will work with ten additional UR faculty from across STEM disciplines to implement this project.

The program team has three priorities:

  1. Discover barriers to student belonging that exist at UR;
  2. Test interventions to best address these barriers; and
  3. Support faculty with resources and programs to promote inclusivity.

“By listening to and learning from our own students, we aim to drive change from within our classrooms, research groups, and student-faculty organizations, while contributing to the national conversation about inclusive teaching,” said Hilliker.

Part of this grant will fund a study led by faculty in UR’s psychology department who have related expertise in belonging, prejudice and status-related disparities, culture/identity, and psychosocial adjustment among college students.

The UR team will collaborate within a learning community with 14 other universities. The grant allocates $475,000 to fund programs on campus and $150,000 to fund activities in collaboration with the other universities.

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We need your help. RVAHub is a small, independent publication, and we depend on our readers to help us provide a vital community service. If you enjoy our content, would you consider a donation as small as $5? We would be immensely grateful! Interested in advertising your business, organization, or event? Get the details here.

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Community

Critters of the Week

A wild critter we spotted in the RVA area and a critter up for adoption by the Richmond SPCA.

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Where Spotted: Tuckahoe Creek Park
Common Name: Red-bellied Woodpecker
Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus
Length: 9.4 in (24 cm)
Weight: 2.0-3.2 oz (56-91 g)
Wingspan: 13.0-16.5 in (33-42 cm)

Quick Facts Courtesy of Cornell Labs

  • A Red-bellied Woodpecker can stick out its tongue nearly 2 inches past the end of its beak. The tip is barbed and the bird’s spit is sticky, making it easier to snatch prey from deep crevices. Males have longer, wider-tipped tongues than females, possibly allowing a breeding pair to forage in slightly different places on their territory and maximize their use of available food.
  • You may sometimes see Red-bellied Woodpeckers wedge large nuts into bark crevices, then whack them into manageable pieces using their beaks. They also use cracks in trees and fence posts to store food for later in the year, a habit it shares with other woodpeckers in its genus.
  • For birds that nest in cavities, nest holes are precious turf. Red-bellied Woodpeckers have been known to take over the nests of other birds, including the much smaller (and endangered) Red-cockaded Woodpecker. But more often they’re victims to the aggressive European Starling. As many as half of all Red-bellied Woodpecker nests in some areas get invaded by starlings.
  • You may occasionally see a Red-bellied Woodpecker flying quickly and erratically through the forest, abruptly changing direction, alighting for an instant and immediately taking off again, keeping up a quick chatter of calls. Scientists categorize this odd behavior as a type of play that probably helps young birds practice the evasive action they may one day need.
  • The oldest known Red-bellied Woodpecker was a male in Georgia, and at least 12 years, 3 months old when he was identified in the wild by his band.

If you’re a fan of original content like those photos above be sure to give our Instagram and Dickie’s Backyard Bird Blind Bonanza on FB a follow and consider making a donation.

Madonna at Richmond SPCA

Are you searching for a fun, friendly and adorable family member? My name is Madonna and I’m the girl for you! I am pretty lonely here by myself, just waiting for my special someone to come along. Won’t you please take me home today?

Age: 3 years, 2 months
Gender: Spayed Female
Color: White / Black
ID: 50949953

Adopt Madonna at Richmond SPCA

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We need your help. RVAHub is a small, independent publication, and we depend on our readers to help us provide a vital community service. If you enjoy our content, would you consider a donation as small as $5? We would be immensely grateful! Interested in advertising your business, organization, or event? Get the details here.

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