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Recycle your fire-prone Christmas trees in Henrico through Sunday, get free mulch

Save room at the landfill, help the environment, and get some free mulch in the process at locations across the county.

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The Keep Henrico Beautiful Committee and Henrico County Department of Public Utilities will accept those now inevitably fire-prone, dried out Christmas trees for recycling into mulch through Sunday, January 8th, the county announced.

The free service, which preserves landfill space and the environment, is available to Henrico residents only. Trees will be accepted at the following locations:

  • Henrico Government Center, 4301 E. Parham Road, in the lower parking lot;
  • Eastern Government Center, 3820 Nine Mile Road, in the front parking lot;
  • Springfield Road Public Use Area, 10600 Fords Country Lane, near Nuckols Road and Interstate 295; and
  • Charles City Road Public Use Area, 2075 Charles City Road.

Trees can be dropped off anytime at the Henrico Government Center and Eastern Government Center and from 7:30 AM – 7:00 PM daily at the Springfield Road and Charles City Road public use areas. Trees must be free of tinsel, lights, ornaments, tree stands, and water bowls, which probably goes without saying.

Free mulch is available to Henrico residents at the public use areas. For information on the tree recycling program, call 804.727.8770.

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Trevor Dickerson is the co-founder and editor of RVAhub.com, lover of all things Richmond, and a master of karate and friendship for everyone.

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U of R professor mails science-themed kits to incoming STEM students

When biology professor Shannon Jones realized the global pandemic would prevent her from bringing students to campus this summer for the University of Richmond’s signature URISE program experience, she figured out a way to send science to them.

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When biology professor Shannon Jones realized the global pandemic would prevent her from bringing students to campus this summer for the University of Richmond’s signature URISE program experience, she figured out a way to send science to them.

From beakers and pipettes to summer reading material, Jones, longtime coordinator of the URISE program, put together 24 kits containing everything a young scientist might need to begin exploring their fields of study.

URISE, which stands for the University of Richmond Integrated Science Experience and is a part of UR’s Integrated Inclusive Science Program, is a pre-first-year program that focuses on skill development, provides authentic research experiences, and builds a community of support for selected students ahead of starting classes in the fall.

The program received the 2018 Inspiring Programs in STEM Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine and has been modeled after at other institutions of higher learning.

“These students are from all around the world and many represent backgrounds that have been historically underrepresented in STEM fields,” said Jones. “Our summer program is so important in beginning to introduce them to our science programs, the lab, each other, and their faculty, and we wanted to figure out a way to still have an enriching experience.”

Jones and additional science faculty are also hosting virtual sessions with the incoming first-year students out of their labs, and their efforts have paid off.

URISE student Daisy Brooks said, “The program has been an amazing opportunity with lots of great people. Even though there are some obvious barriers, such as not being able to collaborate in person, I think completing the sessions virtually has been a great way to get to know new people — building connections with other students and faculty before arriving on campus and making it less daunting.”

Incoming student Christopher Torres echoed those sentiments. “At the beginning when we were introduced to the tools in the kit I thought that it was a great idea because I could participate in the activities from home, and they were also very informative and a way to tie the lesson together at the end of the day,” said Torres. “It was also a great way to conduct experiments at home similar to the ones we learned in the sessions.”

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Check out these summer reading tips, part of HCPS’ ‘Summer Reading Kick-Off’

“During these unprecedented times, it’s more important than ever to stay connected,” said Shannon Hyman, HCPS library services specialist. “This summer, Virginia authors, illustrators, and community partners are joining with our school librarians to challenge our students to stay connected through reading. All activities are optional, engaging, and designed to encourage learners to read widely all summer long.”

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Henrico County Public Schools’ “Summer Reading Kick-Off” aims to build students’ reading skills – and encourage fun – all summer long. At three interactive webpages for HCPS elementary, middle, and high school students, you’ll find reading resources, activities, and tips for keeping your students engaged this summer.

The colorful interactive summer reading pages are available by going to www.henricoschools.us and looking under “Hot Topics” or at https://sites.google.com/henrico.k12.va.us/mockupedflix/summer-reading. The page also features a video welcome to HCPS’ summer program, featuring 15 Virginia authors and illustrators, as well as HCPS community partners.

Students can click and explore as they navigate the reading resources and activities appropriate for their school level. The tropical “Elementary Island” page features an explorable beach resort, the middle school page resembles a comfortable hangout for tweens, and the high school site, based on a day at the park, enables students to select useful reading apps on a virtual cell phone. Each page features a video tour by an HCPS librarian.

The sites include student “launch boards” with activities such as reading a cookbook and making a recipe (elementary), making a stop-motion video based on a book (middle school), and drafting a resume (high school). Students can explore ways to find great reads, take part in virtual book clubs, hear audiobook talks, and more.

“During these unprecedented times, it’s more important than ever to stay connected,” said Shannon Hyman, HCPS library services specialist. “This summer, Virginia authors, illustrators, and community partners are joining with our school librarians to challenge our students to stay connected through reading. All activities are optional, engaging, and designed to encourage learners to read widely all summer long.”

How can you encourage your student to read? These tips from HCPS librarians and Library Services Department staff members can help:

  • Read aloud together with your student every day, at every age.
  • Borrow audiobooks and listen as a family.
  • Opt outside. Bring your book, read on your device, or download an audiobook and enjoy on a walk.
  • Pick up some great magazines to enjoy in the car, at the pool or under a tree! Magazines are gateways to other reading materials and foster visual literacy.
  • Explore Henrico County Public Libraries’ great programs and activities. Your school librarian will be working with our public libraries to share summer reading activities, lists, and opportunities with all students. Be sure to check out Henrico County Public Library’s summer reading program, at henricolibrary.org/summerreading.
  • Remember, if you want your student to read, give them ample opportunities to see YOU reading, too!

For more summer reading tips, go to https://sites.google.com/henrico.k12.va.us/mockupedflix/summer-reading and click on “Printable Summer Reading Overview Page.”

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HCPS families: Take a short survey and help Henrico County Public Schools plan for fall reopening

“The input we get from families and staff will be critical as we formulate our plans,” said Amy Cashwell, HCPS superintendent. “HCPS will take into account state guidance, the advice of health experts and the wishes of the larger community before making any final determinations for the fall.”

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Henrico County Public Schools will reopen in the fall, but what exactly will that look like? The school division is making plans for a safe and healthy return to school and is seeking the input of HCPS families and staff members. The survey results will be used for planning purposes and respondents are not committing to any choices for the 2020-21 school year.

HCPS parents, guardians, and employees received an email recently with a link to a short video about reopening, followed by a survey. The email sender will be “Henrico County Public Schools” and the subject line will read “Back to school: Your feedback needed.” The survey is open through July 5. It is only available to HCPS employees and student households.

“The input we get from families and staff will be critical as we formulate our plans,” said Amy Cashwell, HCPS superintendent. “HCPS will take into account state guidance, the advice of health experts and the wishes of the larger community before making any final determinations for the fall.”

On June 9, Virginia officials issued guidelines for state schools and school divisions to reopen in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. HCPS will use the state guidance, along with staff and community input, to create detailed plans for instruction and health. After an initial review of the guidelines, HCPS is pursuing a plan that combines two approaches: one hybrid model that alternates in-person and virtual learning, and a second fully virtual, parallel pathway:

  • Hybrid learning pathway: One portion of the student body would attend classes on campus for a period of time, while another portion would learn remotely. This pathway contains several options under consideration. The two groups might alternate days or weeks on campus to build a blended learning environment. Having fewer students on campus would make it easier to implement distancing guidelines.
  • Parallel all-virtual learning pathway: Based on the choice of parents or guardians, students may opt for a fully virtual learning experience that parallels the “in-person” instruction happening in classrooms.

Before reopening for any large-scale in-person instruction, HCPS and other Virginia school divisions must show how they will comply with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s COVID-19 prevention strategies, including:

  • Use of face coverings.
  • Health screenings for staff and students.
  • Physical distancing measures.
  • Enhanced hygiene practices for staff and students.
  • Isolating symptomatic cases.
  • Cleaning and disinfecting procedures.

Those not receiving the email should check their email account’s spam or junk folders. For questions about the survey, or if you did not receive an email, contact Helen Whitehurst in HCPS’ Department of Assessment, Research, and Evaluation at [email protected].

For an overview of HCPS’ plans as they stand prior to community feedback, watch the video below.

The school division will make additional announcements as plans continue to be developed in accordance with the Commonwealth’s new health and safety guidelines.

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