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Henrico Animal Control seeks to capture rogue pigs wandering Twin Hickory

Three to four pigs have been spotted in the West End neighborhood over the past week. So far, neither neighbors nor Henrico Animal Control officials have been able to capture the feral hams. 🐷

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A number of rogue pigs–some claim three to four have been spotted–have been roaming the Twin Hickory neighborhood in Glen Allen over the past week.

Neighbors in the planned community near Nuckols Road and Interstate 295 have reportedly tried to capture the pigs, seen walking down sidewalks and foraging in wooded lots, without success.

The pigs–which many have suggested may have been someone’s pets–were last seen in Twin Hickory’s Alden Parke subdivision.

Henrico Animal Care & Control advised those who are keen on capturing the rogue piggies to do so gingerly, per NBC12:

Lt. S.M. Sears with Henrico’s Animal Protection urged anyone who comes into contact with the pig “to gently herd the pig into a fenced in area if there is one available. Another option would be to attempt to regularly feed the pig in a designated area to get it accustomed to coming to a specific place.”

Sears also suggested using a live dog trap to attempt to capture the pig.

Sears urged residents to not chase the pig.

“It is virtually impossible for anyone to chase and catch a pig that is free roaming,” Sears said. “Our officers would be happy to discuss a potential plan of action with anyone in the area that would like to assist.”

Read the full report, and see a video of reporter Kelly Avellino spotting and chasing the pig into the woods, here.

Anyone who’s spotted the pigs is asked to call Henrico Animal Care and Control at 804.727.8800.

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Trevor Dickerson is the co-founder and editor of RVAhub.com, lover of all things Richmond, and a master of karate and friendship for everyone.

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Four-legged assistant at Sheltering Arms is helping change lives

Motivation and support come in many forms, including a cold nose and a warm heart. Sheltering Arms Institute has welcomed its newest team member, Canine Companions for Independence Facility Dog, Clara.

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Motivation and support come in many forms, including a cold nose and a warm heart. Sheltering Arms Institute, a collaboration with VCU Health, has welcomed its newest team member, Canine Companions for Independence Facility Dog, Clara. Clara will assist handler Dr. Cynthia Rolston, Director of Psychosocial Services and Inter-Professional Science, in her work with patients.

Clara is a two-year-old Lab/Golden Retriever cross and has been training since she was eight weeks old. After being carefully matched with one another, Clara and Dr. Rolston spent the last two weeks working with professional Canine Companions instructors to prepare for their new roles. Training consisted of intensive lectures, hands-on practice and simulations, and multiple examinations in order to acquire public certification.

In just her first few days on the job, Clara has already acclimated to the many changes in her life and settled into her new home and work environment, bringing smiles to our patients’ faces.

“This is a new and exciting program for all of us, and I can’t wait to see how Clara helps our patients achieve independence,” Dr. Rolston said. “We will be working together as a team as we integrate Clara into patient therapy sessions at Sheltering Arms Institute.”

Since 1975, Canine Companions has bred, raised, and expertly trained assistance dogs in more than 40 commands designed to assist people with disabilities or to motivate and inspire patients with special needs. Clara can pull toy wagons, push drawers closed, and retrieve all kinds of items. She has specific commands that allow her to interact with patients in a calm and appropriate way.

“We have full confidence Clara will be an exceptional facility dog for Sheltering Arms Institute and bring a host of skills and smiles to the halls daily. She will assist the patients with their therapies, help patients practice their activities of daily living, and bring an added psychological assist,” said Debra Dougherty, Northeast Region Executive Director for Canine Companions for Independence.

Canine Companions for Independence enhances the lives of people with disabilities by training and placing more than 6,000 assistance dogs with program graduates. Canine Companions depends on the support of tens of thousands of donors and volunteers to match our facility with an assistance dog like Clara entirely free of charge. The support for staff training and Clara’s ongoing needs is being provided by generous Sheltering Arms Foundation donors.

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Virginia Board of Education honors HCPS as a ‘School Division of Innovation’

Fifteen of the commonwealth’s 132 school divisions were named “School Divisions of Innovation.” The divisions were recognized for “designing and implementing alternatives to traditional instructional practices and school structures” in order to promote learning, readiness for college and careers, and good citizenship.

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Henrico County Public Schools has been recognized for its educational innovation by the Virginia Board of Education. Fifteen of the commonwealth’s 132 school divisions were named “School Divisions of Innovation.” The divisions were recognized for “designing and implementing alternatives to traditional instructional practices and school structures” in order to promote learning, readiness for college and careers, and good citizenship.

In announcing HCPS’ designation, the state Board cited two HCPS academic programs that give students a greater role in their education:

  • Giving students access to real-time data, as well as “formative feedback” opportunities to promote and measure their knowledge and skills.
  • Implementing a plan for HCPS students at all grade levels to create and use “learner portfolios” of their work. The portfolios enable students to track their own progress toward college, careers, and citizenship, using the state’s “Profile of a Virginia Graduate” as a guide.

School divisions retain the designation for three years. To earn it, local school boards must submit a plan showing how their school divisions met the requirements. Winning school divisions must also submit an annual report to the Virginia Department of Education showing how they are making progress toward the goals described in their plans. The designations were authorized by the General Assembly in 2017. This the first year they have been presented.

“I think it is fair to say that innovation has never been more important in public education than today as schools across the commonwealth and nation focus on improving distance learning in the face of a pandemic, while addressing inequities in opportunities and outcomes,” Daniel Gecker, Virginia Board of Education president, said in a news release. “I congratulate the leaders of all [15] school divisions for creating innovative plans to address the challenges in their schools and engage their students in deeper learning across the curriculum.”

HCPS has implemented a variety of new programs in recent years. In 2017 HCPS adapted the Profile of a Virginia Graduate to create the localized “Henrico Learner Profile.” The Henrico Learner Profile is a common blueprint for the knowledge, skills, attributes, and experiences Henrico students should develop during their HCPS career in order to become life-ready. The school division has also emphasized the “deeper learning” academic model that promotes a more active role for students in their education. Find out more about the Henrico Learner Profile at http://blogs.henrico.k12.va.us/hlp.

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UR President Ronald Crutcher announces plans to step down from post in 2022

Following a sabbatical, Crutcher will return to the faculty as a university professor.  

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Ronald A. Crutcher has announced his intention to step down as president of the University of Richmond with the goal of the next president taking office no later than July 1, 2022.

“As I considered the great disruption and challenges facing higher education due to the pandemic, and contemplated what would best ensure the success of a future presidential search and our institutional momentum, I decided that it was important for the University to have as much time as possible to effectively identify and recruit the next president,” Crutcher said in a letter to alumni, faculty, staff, and students.

“The Board is extraordinarily grateful for the thoughtful manner in which President Crutcher has approached his decision, announcing his plans now to ensure time for a successful presidential search in this challenging national and global climate,” said Paul B. Queally, the board’s rector. “As he indicated to the Board, the University’s momentum of recent years is too important to risk interrupting, and we fully agree.”

Crutcher will continue to advance a variety of critical University initiatives, including guiding UR through the pandemic and the uncertainty and disruption it has brought.

“This year will certainly bring challenges, but it will also offer all of us new possibilities,” Crutcher wrote in his letter. “In every instance, we must seize such moments as opportunities to advance our shared aspirations and dreams for the University — and to realize our goal of being, and being recognized as, one of the strongest liberal arts institutions in the nation. That work continues to encourage and inspire me every day, and I look forward to what we will accomplish together over these next two academic years.”

Under Crutcher’s leadership the University has achieved the following:

  • Enhanced resources available to faculty, including programs focused on academic leadership and the creation of the Teaching and Scholarship Hub.
  • The creation of the Office of Scholars and Fellowships and the growing record of students’ success in securing prestigious national awards.
  • An increased national reputation for academic excellence as evidenced by the University’s highest ever U.S. News & World Report ranking of 22 among the nation’s top liberal arts colleges for 2021.
  • Important attention to developing and implementing strategies to ensure greater diversity and a more inclusive community, as detailed in the University’s Making Excellence Inclusive initiative.
  • A more diverse faculty, with 36% of hires in the last five years being persons of color or international and 42% being women.
  • Increased pride among UR alumni, who are more actively engaging with the University and contributing to historic levels of fundraising success.
  • Outstanding new facilities for well-being and Athletics.
  • Renovations of academic facilities in the arts and in the humanities, including an expansion to Ryland Hall to develop a center for the humanities.

“We look forward to the further achievements that are sure to come under President Crutcher’s continued leadership,” said Susan G. Quisenberry, vice rector. “As he has indicated, he remains intently focused on what he intends to accomplish in the years to come, and the Board very much looks forward to our continued work together in this time.”

The Board will begin the search for the University’s next president this fall and will soon establish and charge a search committee to identify and recommend candidates. The search committee will include trustees, as well as members of the Spider community. Details about the search process, committee, and timeline will be communicated in the coming weeks. Input from the University community about the priorities the new president will be asked to advance and the qualities and skills most important to seek in candidates will also be crucial to the success of the search and the University’s next president.

Following a sabbatical, Crutcher will return to the faculty as a university professor.

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