Connect with us
[adrotate banner="51"]

Community

Local Star of HBO’s Big Brunch Show Hosting Dumpling Pop-up at the Veil

The dumplings will be popping into mouths starting at noon but stick around until 7 pm for a viewing party of the new HBO show The Big Brunch in the sunroom.

Published

on

x

@youngmotherva the Dumpling popup of Daniel Harthauses aka @danielharthausen will be doing their dumpling pop-up takeover starting at 12 pm at the Veil Forest Hill location this Sunday, November 27th. Sorry taco lovers no @ytumama.mx on Sunday. The dumplings will be popping into mouths starting at noon but stick around until 7 pm for a viewing party of the new HBO show The Big Brunch in the sunroom. Those of you in the know already know Daniel is a competitor in The Big Brunch. Limited seating is available.

The Big Brunch Show is created and hosted by Emmy® winner Dan Levy, The Big Brunch celebrates inspiring, undiscovered culinary voices from every corner of the country. This eight-episode cooking competition series gives ten talented chefs the opportunity to share their stories and business dreams while vying for a life-altering $300,000 cash prize.


Will you help support independent, local journalism?

We need your help. RVAHub is a small, independent publication, and we depend on our readers to help us provide a vital community service. If you enjoy our content, would you consider a donation as small as $5? We would be immensely grateful! Interested in advertising your business, organization, or event? Get the details here.

Richard Hayes is the co-founder of RVAHub. When he isn't rounding up neighborhood news, he's likely watching soccer or chasing down the latest and greatest board game.

Community

Richmond Partners Taking Out Pavement Putting in Trees

Eight native trees in this once-paved area, including a swamp white oak, fringetree, black tupelo, and American yellowwood have been planted 120-foot-long stretch of sidewalk.

Published

on

x

Following a two-year effort in South Richmond to address extreme heat and polluted runoff by planting trees in heavily paved areas, this Wednesday the City of Richmond will plant trees in formerly paved stretch of South Richmond together with partners including the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF), the Virginia Department of Forestry, and University of Richmond.

Earlier this year, the partners used machinery to break up and remove pavement from a portion of a 120-foot-long stretch of sidewalk that was 8 feet wide. The work reduced the sidewalk’s width while still meeting accessibility standards, creating new spaces for trees to grow. The poor, compacted soil beneath the pavement was enriched with compost and biochar.

Wednesday afternoon, the partners will plant eight native trees in this once-paved area, including a swamp white oak, fringetree, black tupelo, and American yellowwood.







Replacing pavement with trees beautifies Richmond streets, cleans the air, and reduces polluted runoff to the James River while shading the street to provide relief from extreme heat. Research shows that paved-over, treeless stretches of Richmond can be up to 16 degrees hotter in the summer than leafier parts of the city. This builds on work earlier this fall by CBF and partners to remove and reforest formerly paved areas at Branch’s Baptist Church in South Richmond.

The effort follows the completion of the Greening Southside Richmond Project this fall, in which the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and partners have planted or given away approximately 780 trees to reduce polluted runoff and cool some of Richmond’s hottest neighborhoods. With support from a National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Small Watershed Grant, CBF and partners hope to continue and build on this work in Central Virginia in coming years.

Will you help support independent, local journalism?

We need your help. RVAHub is a small, independent publication, and we depend on our readers to help us provide a vital community service. If you enjoy our content, would you consider a donation as small as $5? We would be immensely grateful! Interested in advertising your business, organization, or event? Get the details here.

Continue Reading

Education

University of Richmond awarded $625K HHMI grant to study barriers to student inclusivity

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute has awarded the University of Richmond a $625K grant that will support efforts to create an inclusive experience for students and enhance student belonging.

Published

on

x

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute has awarded the University of Richmond a $625K grant that will support efforts to create an inclusive experience for students and enhance student belonging.

The HHMI Inclusive Excellence 3 grant is a six-year program and will be led by biology professor Angie Hilliker, who will work with ten additional UR faculty from across STEM disciplines to implement this project.

The program team has three priorities:

  1. Discover barriers to student belonging that exist at UR;
  2. Test interventions to best address these barriers; and
  3. Support faculty with resources and programs to promote inclusivity.

“By listening to and learning from our own students, we aim to drive change from within our classrooms, research groups, and student-faculty organizations, while contributing to the national conversation about inclusive teaching,” said Hilliker.

Part of this grant will fund a study led by faculty in UR’s psychology department who have related expertise in belonging, prejudice and status-related disparities, culture/identity, and psychosocial adjustment among college students.

The UR team will collaborate within a learning community with 14 other universities. The grant allocates $475,000 to fund programs on campus and $150,000 to fund activities in collaboration with the other universities.

Will you help support independent, local journalism?

We need your help. RVAHub is a small, independent publication, and we depend on our readers to help us provide a vital community service. If you enjoy our content, would you consider a donation as small as $5? We would be immensely grateful! Interested in advertising your business, organization, or event? Get the details here.

Continue Reading

Arts & Entertainment

VMFA acquires extensive photography book collection

“This collection is a transformative donation and has greatly increased our holdings in the subject areas of American and European photography,” said Alex Nyerges, VMFA’s Director and CEO.

Published

on

x

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) has announced the gift of a significant library of more than 2,000 American and European photography books, donated by Barry and Gretchen Singer.

“This collection is a transformative donation and has greatly increased our holdings in the subject areas of American and European photography,” said Alex Nyerges, VMFA’s Director and CEO. “These books are already proving invaluable to exhibitions developed by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and this gift further supports the museum’s future photography galleries that are being planned as part of our current expansion project.”

Barry Singer has been one of the country’s leading photography gallerists with a prominent gallery in Petaluma, California, specializing in 19th- and 20th-century photography. “A 2019 conversation with Alex at Paris Photo about the future of my large library of photography books led to my decision to give the collection to VMFA,” said Singer. “I knew that the museum would be able to ensure their care and value their importance, and that the books would be fundamental to VMFA’s other collections and exhibitions.”

Several significant monographs and reference books have been added to the general collection at VMFA’s Margaret R. and Robert M. Freeman Library, and many exceptional photography books and periodicals, including first editions and signed copies, are now part of VMFA’s rare book collection. The Singers’ gift includes the first edition of Robert Frank’s The Americans, published as Les Américains by Robert Delpire in 1958, Josef Sudek Fotografie by Czech film and photography critic Lubomír Linhart, published in 1956, and a first edition of Naked City by legendary photojournalist Weegee, published in 1945.

“This donation is especially relevant because the books relate directly to photographs in VMFA’s collection,” said Lee Ceperich, Director of Library and Special Collections at VMFA. “The library exists to support research about the art collection, tell stories and make connections between the art and the widest audience possible.”

Sarah Kennel, the museum’s Aaron Siskind Curator of Photography and Director of the Raysor Center, notes that many of these rare photography books will augment VMFA’s exhibitions. “One of the most important ways that photography has circulated in the past century is through the photo book, so these very rare editions are an exciting expansion to our holdings and allow us to better show how photography has shaped modern culture.” Included in the donated collection are two books featuring works by Ansel Adams, Michael and Anne in the Yosemite Valley (1941) and The Four Seasons in Yosemite National Park: A Photographic Story of Yosemite’s Spectacular Scenery (1940) — both of which appeared in VMFA’s traveling exhibition Ansel Adams: Compositions in Nature. Additionally, other books from the collection were used to inform the development of the museum’s exhibition Man Ray: The Paris Years and still others will be featured in the upcoming exhibition American, Born Hungary planned to open at VMFA in 2024.

VMFA’s Margaret R. and Robert M. Freeman Library and Special Collections is the most comprehensive art museum research library in the southeastern United States. With more than 150,000 volumes and 200 periodical titles, it provides important resources for the study of art. The library’s archives and rare book holdings include primary source material related to the history and activities of VMFA, the museum’s art collection, the history of art and artists in Virginia.

Will you help support independent, local journalism?

We need your help. RVAHub is a small, independent publication, and we depend on our readers to help us provide a vital community service. If you enjoy our content, would you consider a donation as small as $5? We would be immensely grateful! Interested in advertising your business, organization, or event? Get the details here.

Continue Reading