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Critter of the Week

Critters of the Week

A wild critter we spotted in the RVA area and a critter up for adoption by Richmond SPCA.

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Where Spotted: Powhatan State Park
Common Name: American giant millipede
Scientific Name: Narceus americanus
Length: Up to about 4″ long

Quick Facts

  • These insects were named 1000 foot, clearly based on their large number of legs. No millipede has a thousand legs, at most they may have 750, but most are under 100.
  • Millipedes have segmented bodies and on each segment are 4 legs.
  • Millipedes are herbivorous, preferring to eat decaying leaf litter or fungi.
  • When threatened, they sometimes curl up or release a noxious liquid that contains large amounts of benzoquinones which can cause dermatological burns. This fluid may irritate eyes or skin.

If you’re a fan of original content like those photos above be sure to give our Instagram and Dickie’s Backyard Bird Blind Bonanza on FB a follow and consider making a donation.




Yvette at Richmond SPCA

Yvette is a sweet girl waiting for a friend to adopt her. During her time at the shelter, Yvette has been very shy around new people, but enjoys getting affection. Yvette would thrive in a quiet home with a friend who is willing to let her come out of her shell at her own pace. Stop by the Richmond SPCA to see Yvette, today, to see what a lovely companion she is!

Age: 1 year, 3 months
Gender: Spayed Female
Color: Black / Apricot
ID: 47655193

Adopt Yvette at Richmond SPCA

Learn more about their adoption process.

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Richard Hayes is the co-founder of RVAHub. When he isn't rounding up neighborhood news, he's likely watching soccer or chasing down the latest and greatest board game.

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Critter of the Week

Critters of the Week

A wild critter we spotted in the RVA area and a critter up for adoption by Richmond SPCA.

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on

 

Where Spotted: Dry Rocks Belle Isle
Common Name: Red Saddlebags Dragonfly or Red-mantled Dragonfly
Scientific Name: Tramea onusta
Length: 1.75 inches
Wingspan: Up to 3.5 inches

Quick Facts

  • The color of the RS’s saddlebags varies from red to dark brown, and there’s a clear “window” within each saddlebag. Females have a tawny body; males are redder.
  • Males patrol territories, flying and hovering over areas as large as 3,000 square feet, but mating occurs while the couple is perched in the treetops (they like to roost high off the ground, too).
  • Eggs are deposited in the warm, quiet, shallow waters of a lake or pond.
  • The range is the Eastern half of the United States

If you’re a fan of original content like those photos above be sure to give our Instagram and Dickie’s Backyard Bird Blind Bonanza on FB a follow and consider making a donation.




Portland at Richmond SPCA

Forget everything you know about Portland city because Portland the pooch is the new latest trend! She’s a bottle rocket on four legs looking for the perfect home that’s ready to get up, get movin’ and get adoptin’! Portland has raced her way into the hearts of staff members, but will she be the right one to cross the finish line to yours?

Portland is looking for just the right home and environment to call her own. If you think you may be a good fit for Portland, please visit the Richmond SPCA adoption center or give us a call at (804)521-1307 to learn more.

Age: 2 years,
Gender: Spayed Female
Color: Brown / White
Size: M (dog size guide)
ID: 45425988

Adopt Portland at Richmond SPCA

Learn more about their adoption process.

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Critter of the Week

Critters of the Week

A wild critter we spotted in the RVA area and a critter up for adoption by Richmond SPCA.

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on

 

Where Spotted: Reedy Creek
Common Name: Marbled Salamander
Scientific Name: Ambystoma opacum
Length: 3.5-4.25 in (9 – 10.7 cm)

Quick Facts Courtesy of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 

  • Marbled Salamanders are found throughout the Southeast but are absent from southeastern Georgia, peninsular Florida, and the higher elevations of the Appalachian Mountains.
  • They are a fossorial species, meaning they spend most of their lives underground and out of sight.
  • Like many salamanders, Marbled Salamanders have poison glands in their tails to help deter predators.
  • Females will lay about 30-100 eggs in a depression on land (usually beneath a log or leaf litter). The female stays with her developing eggs until rain fills the wetland and triggers the eggs to hatch. If the rain never comes, then the eggs have the ability to over winter until spring to hatch.

If you’re a fan of original content like those photos above be sure to give our Instagram and Dickie’s Backyard Bird Blind Bonanza on FB a follow and consider making a donation.




 

Yennefer at Richmond SPCA

Are you looking for a fun and rambunctious girl who is not afraid to speak her mind? Look no further than Yennefer! This beautiful young lady can be nervous in new situations (who isn’t?) but once she warms up, she loves to be the center of attention! She truly marches to the beat of her own drum; when she wants affection, she comes right up and gets it. When she wants to play, she’ll find anything to keep her entertained! And when she wants some independent time, she will settle down and do her own thing. She’s a one of a kind lady- are you the family she’s been looking for? Come to our adoption center today to meet this big personality!

Age: 1 year, 5 months
Gender: Spayed Female
Color: Grey / White
ID: 44096456

Adopt Yennefer at Richmond SPCA

Learn more about their adoption process.

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Critter of the Week

Critters of the Week

A wild critter we spotted in the RVA area and a critter up for adoption by Richmond SPCA.

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Where Spotted: Bryan Park
Common Name: Squash Lady Beetle
Scientific Name: Epilachna borealis
Length: 7mm to 10mm (0.27″ to 0.39″)

Quick Facts

  • It is one of two ladybugs or ladybird beetles that are common vegetable pests: the other being the Mexican bean beetle
  • Squash Lady Beetles feed on the leaves of plants in the squash family. This includes summer squash, zucchini, and cucumbers. They also eat bean and pea plants, making them a nuisance in the garden.
  • Adult squash beetles can also be found feeding on the rind of pumpkins and squash later in the season.
  • It is often mistaken for a Ladybug or a Cucumber Beetle because of its similar appearance.
  • Eggs are laid in July, generally on the undersides of the cucurbit leaves in somewhat loose individual clusters of around 45 (and up to as many as 400 total per mated female), and larvae develop through a total of four instar stages over the subsequent three to four weeks before pupating on the leaf undersides.
  • Eggs are often consumed by larvae and adult Squash Beetles and other lady bugs. Squash Beetles can also be attacked by stink bugs, assassin bugs or parasitized by Tachinid flies.

If you’re a fan of original content like those photos above be sure to give our Instagram and Dickie’s Backyard Bird Blind Bonanza on FB a follow and consider making a donation.




Sir Hamilton at Richmond SPCA

Are you searching for a fun, friendly and adorable family member? My name is Sir Hamilton and I’m the dude for you! I am pretty lonely here by myself, just waiting for my special someone to come along. Won’t you please take me home today?

Age: 6 years, 2 months
Gender: Neutered Male
Color: Brown / Black
Size: L (dog size guide)
ID: 47943339

Adopt Sir Hamilton at Richmond SPCA

Learn more about their adoption process.

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