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Nota Bene Market and Dutch & Co. Closing for Good

Note Bene joined Dutch and Company in making a closing announcement last night.

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The announcement of a Shockoe favorite, Nota Bene was made on Facebook last night.

It is with a heavy heart and shaky hands that I type this out. This Sunday will be Nota Bene’s last service. We truly appreciate everything Richmond has done for us over the past 5 years. It has been one hell of a ride. We can’t thank you enough for sticking it out with us as we transitioned from sit down restaurant to our current market concept. It’s been a tough year for all restaurants. Please make sure to support those that are still standing. ❤️

With that being said we are running specials and our current menu until we sell out. Our hours for the next couple day’s will be:

  • 4-7:30 (Today 12/10 & Friday 12/11)
  • 11:30-7:30 (Saturday 12/12)
  • 11:30-4 (Sunday 12/13)

We’d love to see you one last time. Order online or in person. If you have a gift card please use it now!

Next week we will be listing all other in-store items on our website for purchase. (No food service here).

We love you so much Richmond. Thank you for everything.

More bad news from Church Hill as Dutch & Co. made a similar announcement.

A farewell to Dutch & Company

Wise chef once said, “ If it was easy everyone would do it.”

It took us 5 months to conceptualize and build you. Young adults putting into motion their vision of dining out with the community. Inspiration and passion so deep that you don’t realize the long hours that go by as you work relentlessly to bring life into the walls you have built. We didn’t have a lot of money, so we pieced you together with recycled goods and the hard work of creative crafty people. The banquet and sugar caddies from church pews, that a church was getting rid of. The bar from old and busted pallets behind a local hardware store, and hand me down chairs. We worked with what we had, but in doing so you developed your own style and independence, and since you were into recycling we gave you cork flooring and compressed recycled paper as table tops. Ever the old soul with your vintage amber lighting, antique mirrors, and classic Richmond pressed tin ceiling, from day one it felt like you had been around for years.

Dutch & Company, named after Michelle’s family heritage and the company of the people that would work and dine with you.

We envisioned you as a casual neighborhood restaurant, a place where guests would feel comfortable to eat and drink at a reasonable price. But our ambitions were always at battle with your natural quaintness and eventually, you landed somewhere between high-end and casual dining. Your entire menu changed with the seasons, and over your eight-year span, you evolved 32 times showcasing a piece of every talented employee that had ever left an impression on you. The only exception was one dish “the perfect egg”. Which somehow perfectly exemplified your contradictory character, simple yet complex, refined yet homely.

In your prime you exceeded expectations by winning multiple local and national awards, confident yet reserved, preferring to stay out of the limelight and focus on the relationships you had built with every guest, employee and supplier. Who was a constant reminder that it takes many talented and dedicated individuals to make a restaurant successful.

The last couple years you seemed to have found your place in the world, though we still tried to occasionally push our ambitions upon you, we began to check ourselves more often and focus on executing the more simple approach. Simple food is not easy, I think of it like the difference between playing heavy metal to a large audience vs being a solo acoustic guitarist in front of a small crowd. If you miss a note in playing both it’s more noticeable in the latter. Our attention to technique had to be more precise, though we no longer felt the need to compete for status and it allowed you to truly shine in your new form. With this new approach we began to see how you could become a long standing staple in the community.

Serving guests, training employees and forging relationships for many more years to come. But as reflected on the faces of so many who have lost or who are struggling, the world changed in 2020. We attempted to adapt, but each attempt felt less like you, and the numbers never quite added up. I was unaware how heavy the day to day unknown could be. I consider us fortunate though that we were able to let go when we did, and like spring will come again bringing new life, so too will another restaurant come and bring new life to that little corner spot that you once inhabited and hopefully they will be better adapted to the changes.

We may feel that you ended before your time, but we are thankful for the time we had. Through it all, we gave you our all, and what you gave in return to everyone who walked through your doors will carry on through the lessons we learned from you, the standards as a community we achieved with you and every memory and smile we all shared within your walls.

Small businesses in a way can form characters of their own, formed by the many beautiful people within the city it is in, who help to build and keep it going for so many years. Over time it can become a representation of the people within the city, rather than the people who own it. They make cities interesting by adding diversity and we as consumers hold the ability to protect them and carry them through these tough times. If you are able please find ways to support your local businesses and thank you to each and everyone of you who carried us through the years.

Love,
Caleb & Michelle Shriver

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Richard Hayes is the co-founder of RVAHub. When he isn't rounding up neighborhood news, he's likely watching soccer or chasing down the latest and greatest board game.

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Arts & Entertainment

VMFA acquires key work by German expressionist Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

In September 2020, a private collector in Germany made the fair and just decision to restitute Kirchner’s painting to the Fischer family descendants who have donated it to VMFA through a gift-purchase arrangement.

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The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) announced this week that it has acquired a major work by German artist Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. The oil painting, completed in 1916, is entitled Taunus Road (German: Autostrasse im Taunus). In September 2020, a private collector in Germany made the fair and just decision to restitute Kirchner’s painting to the Fischer family descendants who have donated it to VMFA through a gift-purchase arrangement.

“We are pleased that this painting, Taunus Road, was returned to the Fischer family and that it joins other paintings by Kirchner in the Ludwig and Rosy Fischer Collection at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts,” said Alex Nyerges, VMFA’s Director and CEO. “The donation of this painting is the realization of a long-term commitment on behalf of both the Fischer family and VMFA to reunite restituted works from the Fischer Collection.”

In 2016 Kirchner’s painting Sand Hills at Grünau was restituted by the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York to the descendants of Max Fischer as the result of a related Nazi era restitution case and acquired by VMFA through a similar gift-purchase arrangement. After this painting was returned to the family, they made clear their commitment to not only reunite it with the Ludwig and Rosy Fischer Collection at VMFA but also any future works from Max’s portion of the family collection that were restituted to the family.

“Having grown up in a home surrounded by these vivid works of art, it was a natural decision to send any restituted works to VMFA, to rejoin the Ludwig and Rosy Fischer Collection at the museum,” Eva Marx said. “By reuniting this work with the rest of the collection, we honor our grandparents’ vision and our parents’ dedication to sharing these works with the public.”

Ludwig and Rosy Fischer were forward thinking art collectors in Frankfurt, Germany, who between 1905 and 1925 built one of the most impressive collections of German Expressionist art of the time, with a special emphasis on the artists of the Die Brücke movement. Their sons, Ernst and Max, inherited the collection of approximately 500 works in 1926. After the Nazis gained power in Germany, Ernst left the country in 1934 and eventually settled in Richmond, Virginia, with his half of the collection. When Max left the following year, he was able to take only a few works out of Germany, and the remainder were presumed lost or stolen. Taunus Road is the second painting that has been recovered from the lost portion of Max’s half of the collection and returned to the Fischer descendants.

“Adding this work to the Ludwig and Rosy Fischer Collection helps us to tell a fuller story of the ways in which Hitler’s rise to power impacted the Fischer family and their collection. Displaying Taunus Road alongside Sand Hills in the German Expressionist Gallery adds significantly to our understanding of Ludwig and Rosy Fischers’ vision as important early collectors of Kirchner’s work in particular,” said Dr. Sarah Eckhardt, VMFA’s Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. “It is the enormous privilege of the museum to continue to work with the Fischer family as we steward this phenomenal collection of German art and share it with our public,” added Dr. Michael Taylor, VMFA’s Chief Curator and Deputy Director for Art and Education.

Kirchner was a leader and founding member of the Die Brücke group, formed in 1905. These artists looked at the rampant industrialization of the early 20th century with both fascination and despair. Responding to the changing world around them, they created art characterized by loose, gestural brushstrokes and vivid palettes of bold, saturated colors. While many of the Die Brücke artists depicted urban scenes, they also escaped their city studios to paint rural landscapes as antidotes to the pressures and anxieties of modern life. Landscapes were a central theme throughout Kirchner’s work.

Taunus Road provides a strong example of Kirchner’s vibrant landscapes produced between 1915 and 1918, a period scholars have described as Kirchner’s “crisis” years. He painted the scene in the midst of World War I, during his stay at the sanatorium in Königstein im Taunus, a community in the Taunus mountains north of Frankfurt where, after granted leave from the military, he received treatment following a nervous breakdown. Paint is applied in thin, loose layers to the canvas, producing a quickly executed, dynamic work. The curving trees on the left side and three purple clouds at the top of the composition frame the coral-colored highway. The division created by the roadway produces a tension between the idea of unadulterated nature and the incursion of humans into the landscape.

Taunus Road is currently on view in the German Expressionist Gallery at VMFA.

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Business

New Ginter Park apartment community sells to local buyer for almost double assessed value

The Canopy at Ginter Park apartments, which sold for $83 million, was recently assessed by the City of Richmond at a value of $45 million.

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From Richmond BizSense:

In their second such deal in as many years, a local real estate firm has picked up a Tennessee-based builder’s latest apartment development in the Richmond market.

Bristol Development Group sold its 301-unit Canopy at Ginter Park apartments for $83.75 million to Capital Square, the Innsbrook-based firm that just over a year ago bought Bristol’s 2000 West Creek apartments in Goochland County.

The Canopy sale closed Dec. 30, with Colliers’ Mid-Atlantic Multifamily Advisory Group brokering the deal. The sale price amounts to $278,239 per door, and represents a nearly $29 million windfall for Bristol, which finished the complex last spring at a cost of $55 million.

The latest city assessment valued the 15-acre property, at Brook Road and Westwood Avenue in Richmond’s Northside, at $45.6 million.

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Community

Richmond Animal Care and Control Looking for Information on Dog Found in Dumpster

The dog was found in a dumpster at the Residences at Westover Hills (5852 Westower Drive). If you have an information please call 647-5573 or email [email protected]

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From RACC Facebook:

We just don’t know what to say about this one. Swear words want to come out first…followed by tears…then back to bigger swear words. 😡😭😡 This sweet dog was found in this dumpster at the Residences at Westover Hills. No joke. Citizens saw him and called our team. Officer Jones removed him from the dumpster and took him straight to Virginia Veterinary Centers.

We named him Blue Skies. 🌼 He’s 10 months old and was in terrible shape; starved, covered in feces, with open wounds on his body-our RACC Medical Pics closed group shows more (if you can handle graphic). We need your help finding the person responsible for his suffering. Please call 647-5573 or email [email protected] with information. Our hearts are breaking over the sweet spirit of this dog that deserves a chance at a better life. 💔 Please share-plus he will need a home-email if you can help with that too. 💕 #weareyourcityshelter #throwninthetrash #HelpUsHelpHim #ijustcantanymore

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