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New plasma donation center opening on Staples Mill Road, creating 60 new jobs

This is the second BioLife center to open in Virginia, and it is expected to bring more than 60 new jobs to the Richmond community.

RVAHub Staff

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A new plasma center is opening its doors this weekend in the Near West End. BioLife Plasma Services is opening a new location in Richmond, which will be collecting standard plasma that is processed into a wide variety of therapeutics for thousands of patients around the world with rare, life-threatening diseases, such as immunodeficiency disorders, hemophilia, and hereditary angioedema. The need for plasma is greater than ever, and donations can help save lives.

Prospective donors can make online appointments at the Richmond location at 8702 Staples Mill Road, which opens on Saturday, October 31. This is the second BioLife center to open in Virginia, and it is expected to bring more than 60 new jobs to the Richmond community. The center does not yet have the FDA regulatory license needed to release convalescent plasma donations, but plans to collect convalescent plasma donations in the future.

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Education

University of Richmond announces new academic programs

The popular Healthcare Studies program is becoming the Health Studies Department; new programming is available in Africana Studies and Data Science/Analytics.

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The University of Richmond has announced curriculum changes that will provide new academic opportunities for students and faculty. These changes include the healthcare studies program becoming an independent department and establishing two new program areas: Africana Studies and data science/analytics.

“At the University of Richmond, we seek to educate students in an academically challenging, intellectually vibrant, and collaborative community,” said Dean of the School of Arts & Sciences Patrice Rankine. “To achieve this we must meet the needs of our students and fill in gaps in important fields of study that are necessary to educate our future leaders. These changes will continue advancing that mission.”

Health Studies Department

Healthcare studies was established as a minor in 2007 and quickly grew in popularity with at least 25 students graduating with the minor within five years. Healthcare studies was established as a major in 2012, and by 2015 became the fifth largest A&S major. This fall the program will become the Department of Health Studies to support additional options for faculty and students, specifically related to global health and epidemiology.

“Health-related fields play a central role in the global economy,” said Rankine. “We are uniquely positioned at UR to provide students with a foundation in all areas that comprise the health industry and allied fields, including the ethics and anthropology of healthcare, historical and philosophical analysis, and the humanistic sensibility about health and well-being that comes with the study of literature, philosophy, and other disciplines taught at UR.”

The Department of Health Studies, which will continue to provide students with options to study business, economics, and the health industry, will be chaired by Rick Mayes, an expert in healthcare policy and longtime co-coordinator of the healthcare studies program.

Africana Studies

A new Africana Studies program, a focus that reflects initial petitioning from students, has been approved. The program will officially launch in the fall of 2022 with a suite of required courses currently under development, but students wishing to major or minor in Africana Studies can begin taking elective courses in the fall.

“The Africana Studies program offers the depth of humanistic thought, including

philosophical, interpretive, creative, and fine arts, alongside training in the skill sets of the social and natural sciences,” Rankine said.

The home school for the Africana Studies program will be A&S, but students will be able to take elective courses across disciplines, including in the Robins School of Business and the Jepson School of Leadership Studies.

Data Analytics and Data Science

We live in a world increasingly reliant upon data. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts employment in data-related fields will grow by 30% in the next 10 years. UR is now offering students new opportunities related to data analytics and data science, including a data science concentration for computer science and mathematics students, a business analytics concentration for business majors, and a Bachelor of Science in Professional Studies (BSPS) major in data analytics offered through SPCS.

“We are training our students for future careers that, in many cases, have not yet been invented, but we do know that data, and the quantitative, computational analysis of that data will be critically important,” said chemistry professor Carol Parish, the associate provost for academic innovation who is overseeing the data science initiative.

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People

PHOTOS: Cedarfield retirement community opens new $16 million apartment-style expansion

Cedarfield team members and residents have been working together to transition from an “institutional feel” to the Household model, joining a global health services and senior care movement. Household allows for greater emphasis on engaging residents individually by helping them continue their life pursuits as opposed to making them fit the mold of a traditional nursing home resident.

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Cedarfield, a Henrico County senior living retirement community, has completed the final leg of completion on a $100 million Cedarfield Master Plan Expansion project incorporating a person-centered approach that shapes the physical environment, organizational structure, and enhances interpersonal relationships for residents, family, and staff.

The $16 million, 16,000-square-foot, 40-apartment household facility features residential and industrial kitchens, newly designed dining spaces with multi-seating options, a formal area with a fireplace, family room, and private meeting areas. In addition to the amazing common spaces, every Household resident will enjoy a newly updated apartment, complete with private entryways and doorbells. While creating an atmosphere of genuine home, Household also provides residents with clear opportunities to direct their own lives.

“In this Household model, residents and team members are engaged every step of the way – from learning circles to determining the interests of individual residents, to planning, to implementing and running programs for the household,” says Cedarfield Associate Executive Director Matt Dameron.

Cedarfield team members and residents have been working together to transition from an “institutional feel” to the Household model, joining a global health services and senior care movement. Household allows for greater emphasis on engaging residents individually by helping them continue their life pursuits as opposed to making them fit the mold of a traditional nursing home resident.

“While there are team members in each Household that are primarily responsible for programming, the goal of this model is inclusivity,” says Dameron. He continued, “It could be large scale, such as leading a group program or cooking everyone a meal, to something as simple as sitting with a resident and sharing stories over a cup of coffee.”

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Government

Community-based doula project launches in Henrico, aiming to provide free support to pregnant women of color

Eligible individuals who apply for the program receive free Doula care through Birth in Color RVA or Urban Baby Beginnings.

RVAHub Staff

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Richmond and Henrico Health Districts have implemented a fund to support Black- or African American-identifying pregnant individuals living in Henrico to access local community-based Doula organizations. Eligible individuals who apply for the program receive free Doula care through Birth in Color RVA or Urban Baby Beginnings. The doula program is made possible by the Greater Richmond Regional Maternal Child Health Taskforce, which is composed of public health, birthing, parenting, and equity experts. The program was launched in March and is funded through a grant sponsored by the Henrico County Office of Emergency Management.

A community-based doula is a trained labor support person who comes from the same culture and background as the person giving birth. As trusted community members, community-based doulas perform home visits, help connect persons giving birth to local social services, and provide a holistic approach focusing on prenatal and postnatal health.

“We are intentional about addressing health disparities for black people… Doulas can help improve the maternal health experience and address health disparities by reducing the impacts of racism and racial bias on pregnant and postpartum people,” explains Kenda Sutton-EL, Full Spectrum Doula Trainer and Executive Director, Birth In Color RVA.

This program seeks to eliminate health disparities and offer an empowering birth experience. Promising evidence indicates doulas lessen the chance of low birth weight and infant/maternal mortality. Working with a doula has also been associated with more spontaneous vaginal births, higher satisfaction with the birth experience, increased breastfeeding initiation, and shorter labor.

“Perinatal community-led programs help address barriers by providing a culturally congruent web of support centered around respectful and quality reproductive care,” explains Stephanie Spencer, Registered Nurse, and Executive Director, Urban Baby Beginnings. “For over 27 years, Urban Baby Beginnings has addressed barriers… We are honored to continue expanding our community-based support programs.”

Interested individuals can learn more about the program by visiting Henrico County’s website or apply using this screening form. Due to limited resources, acceptance into the program is not guaranteed.

The community-based doula fund is just one of the initiatives coming out of the taskforce; the group seeks to improve maternal and infant health outcomes and eliminate disparities through focusing on doula care, family planning, and integrative care models.

“Our partners in this work are knowledgeable, experienced, and committed to serving our communities,” says Whitney Tidwell, Maternal Child Health Nurse Coordinator at Richmond and Henrico Health Districts. “It has been an honor to work with them.”

Anyone interested in learning more about the taskforce can visit the website or email [email protected].

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