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Richmond Then and Now: The National

A then and now snapshot of Richmond.

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The photo above is from 1921 by Dementi Studios.

From the Richmond Times Dispatch photo archives with the following text: “In July 1961, a local corporation purchased buildings at the northeast corner of Seventh and East Broad streets in downtown Richmond. The purchase included the National Theater and other properties; tenants continuing to occupy their quarters included Stein’t men’s clothier, Pat’s Record Shop and Stonestreet Brothers Jewelers. An idea of putting a hotel on the site never materialized.

Date and source unknown but Lon Chaney in “Witchcraft” came out in 1964

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Richard Hayes is the co-founder of RVAHub. When he isn't rounding up neighborhood news, he's likely watching soccer or chasing down the latest and greatest board game.

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Richmond Then and Now: 316 W. Broad Street

A then and now snapshot of Richmond locations.

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Original image from The Library of Virginia Flickr, Moses’ Barber Shop, 316 West Broad Street, Adolph B. Rice Studio, Date: 1956 Mar. 4

 

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Events

Photos: Take Flight in a B-17

The Sentimental Journey doesn’t take flight until this weekend but we went out the Hanover County Municipal Airport to grab a few shots.

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Sentimental Journey is the nickname of a B-17G Flying Fortress bomber. It is based at the Commemorative Air Force Museum in Mesa, Arizona but it will be staying at the Hanover County Municipal Airport (11152 Air Park Rd, Ashland) through the weekend.

With a crew of 10, a total of 12,731 B-17s flew in World War 2. Designed specifically for daylight precision bombing, B-17s flew unescorted bombing missions over Europe for much of the war. B-17s were legendary for their ability to return home after taking brutal poundings. They dropped over 640,000 tons of bombs over Europe. The Sentimental Journey is one of only five B-17s around the world actively flying today and was built in November 1944. After the war, the Sentimental Journey spent its time fighting forest fires.

When checking it out make sure and read the signatures of veterans that have signed the bomb bay doors. With just a few brief words the experiences of these veterans come alive.

From now until September 20th the plane will be available for viewing and for $10 ($20 for a family) you can step inside and see how truly cramped this plane was for the crew of 10. Starting on Friday the plane will be taking a limited number of passengers on flights. Cost for the flights are $425 per waist compartment seat (6 available), $850 per Bombardier/Navigator Seat (2 available). The Bombardier/Navigator seats are at the nose of the plan and have an unbeatable view.

Schedule

  • Tuesday-Thursday, the grounds will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Friday-Sunday, the grounds will be open from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Rides can be scheduled online or by calling 480-462-2992.

Technical details on the Sentimental Journey from the owners at the Commemorative Air Force Museum.

General Characteristics
Type: Heavy/Strategic Bomber
Manufacturer: Boeing (later on Vega and Douglas)
Maiden Flight: 28 July 1935
Introduced: April 1938
Theater of War: World War II
Number Produced: 12,731
Status: Retired in 1968
Our B-17G “Sentimental Journey” was built in November, 1944 at the Douglas plant in California

Dimensions
Crew: 10
Wingspan: 103 ft 9 in
Length: 74 ft 4 in
Height: 19 ft 3 in
Empty Weight: 36,134 lbs
Max Takeoff Weight: 65,500 lbs

Performance
Power Plant: (4) Wright R-1820-97 Cyclone Turbo-Supercharged Radials
Horsepower: 1,200 hp. each
Maximum Speed: 263 knots (302 mph)
Service Ceiling: 36,400 ft
Rate of Climb: 900 ft/min
Range: 3,259 nm (3,750 mi)
Armament: Guns: (13) 0.50 in (12.7 mm) M2 Browning Machine Guns
Payload: Up to 8,000 lbs ordnance (short range missions of less than 400 mi) and up to 4,500 lbs ordnance (long range missions of up to 800 mi)

 

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Richmond Then and Now: Stone House at Forest Hill Park

A then and now snapshot of Richmond.

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The original source of photo unknown but there is a version on RTD Archives with the following text:

Trolley at Forest Hill Park, circa 1910. Standing at left of the trolley in the dark suit is Richmond businessman T. J. Cousins. In 1889, the property that would become Forest Hill Park was sold to the Southside Land and Improvement Company, and became a terminus for the Forest Hill trolley, part of one of the first successful trolley systems in the United States. To attract passengers to the countryside, the residence on the property was converted into a trolley terminus and an elaborate amusement park was built on the grounds, complete with carousel, roller coaster, fun house, dance hall, penny arcade, and golf course. The park also included a bath house, swimming area, and boat lake. The park remained a popular Richmond attraction until it closed in 1932 due to the economic constraints of the Great Depression.

Forest Hill Neighborhood Association has a nice brief history of the property as well.

If you’re interested in seeing some great pictures of Richmond from the eyes of a streetcar operator find a copy of  “From A Richmond Streetcar Life Through the Lens of Harris Stilson”.

In the 1900s Harris Stilson worked as a streetcar operator. His camera never left his side. He was constantly capturing the daily minutiae of Richmonders simply living. Looking at his photos is the closest you can come to a time machine. Harris’ great-granddaughter, Kitty Snow went through his collection and published the book.

 

 

 

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