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Critter of the Week

Critters of the Week

A wild critter we spotted in the RVA area and a critter up for adoption by SPCA or RACC.

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Where Spotted: Westover Hills
Common Name: Eastern Chipmunk (It could be a Least Chipmunk any chipmunk experts want to chime in?)
Scientific Name: Tamias striatus
Length: 8-12 inches in length including the tail (the one pictured was considerably smaller)
Weight: 2.3-4.5 oz

Quick Facts

  • The name “chipmunk” comes from the Ojibwe word ajidamoo (or possibly ajidamoonh, the same word in the Ottawa dialect of Ojibwe), which translates literally as “one who descends trees headlong.”
  • The eastern chipmunk defends its burrow and lives a solitary life, except during mating season.
  • To hide the construction of its burrow, the eastern chipmunk carries soil to a different location in its cheek pouches.
  • It can climb trees well, but constructs underground nests with extensive tunnel systems, often with several entrances.

Mingo from Richmond SPCA

Hi there friends! My name is Mingo! I am a very loving girl with scads of personality. I am on the quest for a home that is quieter and low key; who will love me for who I am. Isn’t that everyone’s dream? I enjoy watching movies and cool Netflix shows, chewing on my bully sticks, and going on long morning walks. If you’re looking for a very special companion, come ask about me at the Richmond SPCA.
Age: 3 years, 7 months
Gender: Spayed Female
Color: Black / White
Size: M (dog size guide)
ID: 40099067

Adopt Mingo at Richmond SPCA

About their adoption process

Please note that the adoptable critter we’ve selected was available when we created the post the animal might not be available when you go to the facility.

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Richard Hayes is the co-founder of RVAHub. When he isn't rounding up neighborhood news, he's likely watching soccer or chasing down the latest and greatest board game.

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Critter of the Week

Critters of the Week

A wild critter we spotted in the RVA area and a critter up for adoption by SPCA or RACC.

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Where Spotted: Belle Isle
Common Name: Miner Bee aka Chimney Bee
Scientific Name: Anthophora abrupta
Length: 8-17 mm

Quick Facts

  • Mining bees (‘Andrenidae’) are one of the largest groups of solitary bees. It is believed to consist of over 4500 known species of bees across the world.
  • Adults may be active for 6 – 8 weeks of the year, and the new adults that emerge will need to hibernate over winter again, to re-emerge in Spring. Although solitary, some species may nest in aggregations.
  • Non-aggressive. They ignored me as a sat nearby taking photos.
  • Like most native bees, they do not produce honey and so do not attract bears, raccoons, opossums, or skunks.
  • Each tunnel is usually separate from other tunnels, although they may live in large communities with hundreds, or even thousands, of tunnels. Similar to a housing development, each home is unique to the owner.

Not so Quick Fact on the Tunnels from the University of Flordia

After digging their burrows, Anthophora abrupta females line the walls and cells with a glandular secretion excreted from their Dufour’s gland (a gland near the base of the abdomen associated with egg-laying). It begins as a clear liquid and then turns into a solid plate with wax-like consistency. This process essentially waterproofs the cell, making it cup-like for the provisioning of the egg.

Adult Anthophora abrupta females forage on several plants, collecting pollen and nectar. They place a few loads of dry pollen into an excavated cell and moisten it with nectar and more secretions from the Dufour’s gland. The females then mix these substances into a soupy mass. They then lay a single egg onto the pollen mixture and seal the cell with clay, leaving a single pore in the capping.

Layla at Richmond SPCA

Layla
Got me on my knees
Layla
Begging darling please
Layla
Darling won’t you ease my worried mind?

Age: 5 years, 1 month
Gender: Spayed Female
Color: Grey
Size: L (dog size guide)
ID: 44196713

Adopt Layla at Richmond SPCA

Learn more about their adoption process.

To reduce visitor traffic, during the COVID-19 outbreak they are scheduling adoption appointments beginning Tuesday, March 17, 2020. Please leave your phone number in a voicemail or email and an adoption counselor will call to set an appointment for you to meet with a pet. Email the adoption center or call 804-521-1307.




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Critters of the Week

A wild critter we spotted in the RVA area and a critter up for adoption by SPCA or RACC.

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Where Spotted: Westover Hills
Common Name: Eastern Towhee
Scientific Name: Pipilo erythrophthalmus
Length: 6.8-8.2 in (17.3-20.8 cm)
Weight: 1.1-1.8 oz (32-52 g)
Wingspan: 7.9-11.0 in (20-28 cm)

Quick Facts (Courtesy Cornell Lab)

  • Eastern Towhees are birds of the undergrowth, where their rummaging makes far more noise than you would expect for their size.
  • The Eastern Towhee and the very similar Spotted Towhee of western North America used to be considered the same species, the Rufous-sided Towhee. The two forms still occur together in the Great Plains, where they sometimes interbreed.
  • Eastern Towhees are common victims of the parasitic Brown-headed Cowbird. Female cowbirds lay eggs in towhee nests, then leave the birds to raise their cowbird young. In some areas cowbirds lay eggs in more than half of all towhee nests. Towhees, unlike some other birds, show no ability to recognize or remove the imposter’s eggs.
  • Eastern Towhees tend to be pretty solitary, and they use a number of threat displays to tell other towhees they’re not welcome. You may see contentious males lift, spread, or droop one or both wings, fan their tails, or flick their tails to show off the white spots at the corners. Studies have shown that male towhees tend to defend territories many times larger than needed simply to provide food.
  • The oldest known Eastern Towhee was a male in South Carolina, and at least 12 years, 3 months old.

Blueberry at Richmond SPCA

Have you been on the search for a cat that has many layers of personality? Has a swagger in his step? Is handsome, affectionate and always seeks the spotlight? Yep, this is me benevolent Blueberry! Almost anything I do is with exuberance. Why, I may just inspire you to be an artist; I can drape myself on the sofa and you can begin to paint your masterpiece – me! And lastly, I have one tiny favor that I need to ask is that you please do not get me confused with a chicken, because I love to chirp! Now that you have read about me all you need to do is rush here to the Richmond SPCA!

Age: 4 years, 1 month
Gender: Neutered Male
Color: Brown
Declawed: No
ID: 31616720

Adopt Blueberry at Richmond SPCA

Learn more about their adoption process.

To reduce visitor traffic, during the COVID-19 outbreak they are scheduling adoption appointments beginning Tuesday, March 17, 2020. Please leave your phone number in a voicemail or email and an adoption counselor will call to set an appointment for you to meet with a pet. Email the adoption center or call 804-521-1307.

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Critters of the Week

A wild critter we spotted in the RVA area and a critter up for adoption by SPCA or RACC.

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Where Spotted: Reedy Creek and Pony Pasture
Common Name: Spotted Sandpiper
Scientific Name: Actitis macularius
Weight: 1.2-1.8 oz
Length: 7.1–7.9 in
Wingspan: 14.6-15.8 in

Quick Facts (Courtesy Cornell Lab)

  • The Spotted Sandpiper is the most widespread breeding sandpiper in North America.
  • Female Spotted Sandpipers sometimes practice an unusual breeding strategy called polyandry, where a female mates with up to four males, each of which then cares for a clutch of eggs.
  • Its characteristic teetering motion has earned the Spotted Sandpiper many nicknames. Among them are teeter-peep, teeter-bob, jerk or perk bird, teeter-snipe, and tip-tail.
  • The female may store sperm for up to one month. The eggs she lays for one male may be fathered by a different male in a previous mating.

If you like seeing pictures of birds you can check out my Facebook page Dickie’s Backyard Bird Bonanza.  This effort is unrelated to RVAHub. It’s just a way for me to share pictures without flooding my personal feed and annoying my friends. I fear that ship has long since sailed.

Queenie at Richmond SPCA

All hail the Queenie! Adopting me will automatically make you a royal family. I lead my kingdom with kindness, a bubbling personality, and every day is casual Friday. I make the laps of my best friends my throne and declare my laws through snorts and grunts. I’m ready to relocate to a new castle. Ideally one with lots of treats, toys, and at least one nap time a day. Do your noble duty and call the Adoptions Department at (804)521-1307 to find out more about me today!

Age: 2 years, 1 month
Gender: Spayed Female
Color: Tan / White
Size: L (dog size guide)
ID: 44137713

Adopt Queenie at Richmond SPCA

Learn more about their adoption process.

To reduce visitor traffic, during the COVID-19 outbreak they are scheduling adoption appointments beginning Tuesday, March 17, 2020. Please leave your phone number in a voicemail or email and an adoption counselor will call to set an appointment for you to meet with a pet. Email the adoption center or call 804-521-1307.




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