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New law seeks to treat pets more humanely

A bill moving through the General Assembly would require pet owners to use a tether at least 15 feet long when restraining a companion animal outside. The legislation also seeks to protect pets from extreme weather.

Capital News Service

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By Mario Sequeira Quesada

The saying goes “a dog is man’s best friend” — and that’s exactly what Sen. Lionell Spruill said he wanted when he was a boy. When he couldn’t have a pet, he began to notice how some dogs in his neighborhood were mistreated — left out overnight and in extreme weather.

The Democratic senator from Chesapeake said those memories prompted his bill to regulate the tethering of animals and improve their shelter conditions. SB 1025 passed the Senate, 29-11.

On Tuesday, the House Rules Committee heard the bill and referred it to the House Committee on Agriculture, Chesapeake and Natural Resources for consideration.

Under the bill, companion animals could not be tied up during a heat advisory or if a severe weather warning has been issued, including hurricanes, tropical storms or tornado warnings. Spruill proposed specific temperature regulations — under 32 degrees and over 85 degrees — but they were removed when the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources amended the bill.

Under existing state law, the rope, chain or other tether restraining an animal outside can be as short as 3 feet. Spruill’s bill would change the minimum tethering length to 15 feet or four times the length of the animal — whichever is greater. The measure would prohibit attaching weights or other heavy objects to the tether.

“It is the wrong thing to do to keep an animal and don’t treat it properly,” Spruill said. “If you have an animal, treat it as you would treat a person.”

Calls from people concerned about animals left outside usually spike at Richmond Animal Care and Control during extreme temperatures. Animal control supervisor Robert Leinberger said the bill would be a step toward protecting animals, but he is uncertain how well it would work across the state.

“Localities count, with different needs and possibilities. They should have the right to decide their own tethering rules,” Leinberger said.

The main problem is that each locality would have different resources to deal with these issues, he said.

The bill would authorize local governments to adopt ordinances that parallel or are tougher than state law. It also exempts animals involved in agriculture or hunting from the rules on tethering and extreme weather.

Many pet owners support efforts to ensure that animals are treated humanely.

“There should be rules to keep the animals inside and in well-conditioned shelters,” said Jonathan Winebrenner, a Falls Church resident who owns two dogs. He said protection from severe winter elements is key, but people don’t consider how harsh summer can also be.

“I am more worried about when it’s hot,” Winebrenner said. “The pavement can ruin their paws, and the dogs can dehydrate.”

Spruill says people should follow the Golden Rule in treating a pet. “Treat it as how you treat yourself. If you are cold, you come inside. Do the same for the animal.”

He said getting the bill through the Senate was a difficult journey.

“You would be surprised by the amount of challenges I’ve faced to get this bill passed,” he said. “I ask them [delegates] to have compassion and don’t vote the bill down.”

The House of Delegates has indicated that it may support legislation to require a longer tether for animals.

Like Spruill’s bill, HB 1827, proposed by Del. Robert Orrock, R-Caroline, sought to mandate that tethers be 15 feet long or four times the length of the animal. Orrock’s bill won approval from the House but was killed last week in the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources.

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The Capital News Service is a flagship program of VCU’s Richard T. Robertson School of Media and Culture. In the program, journalism students cover news in Richmond and across Virginia and distribute their stories, photos, and other content to more than 100 newspapers, television and radio stations, and news websites.

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Community

Bookbinder’s Brings you Mac & Cheese on Another Level with BIGWIFE’S Pop-Up

This isn’t your typical mom’s mac & cheese. If your mom makes mac & cheese like this we would like to be adopted.

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Old Original Bookbinder’s Seafood & Steakhouse has launched a new experimental pop-up concept focusing exclusively on macaroni and cheese. BIGWIFE’S Mac & Cheese is operating for delivery and carryout from the Bookbinder’s kitchen.

The inventive menu includes creative spins like Buffalo Mac with spicy chicken and gorgonzola cheese; Little Figgy Mac with goat cheese, ham and fig; Mac Lorraine with bacon, scallions, and gruyere; and Greek Wedding Mac with tomato, olive, artichokes, pepperoncini and feta. Any mac can be made gluten free.

Orders can be placed at https://www.bigwifesmac.com/ and via Grubhub. BIGWIFE’S is open Monday through Thursday from 5 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Old Original Bookbinder’s is located at 2306 E Cary Street, Richmond, VA 23223.

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Crime

City of Richmond declares State of Emergency due to “credible threats” related to planned protests

The city’s declaration opens up funds for emergency use and was voted into effect unanimously by City Council Monday evening.

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The City of Richmond and Mayor Levar Stoney’s administration has declared a State of Emergency for the city due to what officials call “credible threats” of violence related to planned protests leading up to President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration on January 20th.

The declaration follows Governor Ralph Northam’s declaration of a statewide State of Emergency, which allowed the administration to send National Guard troops and State Troopers to Washington, D.C. to help with security, logistics, and other immediate needs following the insurrection at the Capitol last week.

The city’s declaration opens up funds for emergency use and was voted into effect unanimously by City Council Monday evening.

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Business

Family of local freight and transportation company makes $2 million donation to children’s hospital construction project

The Children’s Hospital Foundation’s matching campaign effectively will double the gift to $4 million.

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A local freight and transportation provider has made a major gift towards the construction of the forthcoming Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU expansion. In addition to the company’s gift of $150,000, Estes family members committed $1.85 million to support the Wonder Tower, the new home for Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU’s inpatient, emergency, and trauma services.

The two donations from Estes Express Lines and the Estes family were matched by the Children’s Hospital Foundation, maximizing the total investment in the Wonder Tower to $4 million. As part of the capital campaign to raise $100 million, the foundation is matching the first $25 million in gifts from the community.

“The support of Estes Express Lines and the Estes family is extremely meaningful. We’re grateful they’ve added their voice and support to our mission to build a world-class pediatric hospital in Richmond,” said Lauren Moore, president and chief executive officer of Children’s Hospital Foundation. “They’re truly a values-focused company and family, and their gifts reflect the importance they place on protecting children and their childhoods.”

“We are a family-owned business that’s had the honor of working with thousands of Richmond-area families for nearly 90 years,” said Rob Estes, president and CEO of Estes Express Lines. “Children deserve the best possible medical care when they need it, and we’re proud to support Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, as a company, and as a family.”

As part of the donation, some areas of the Wonder Tower will be named in honor of Estes, including the hospital’s loading dock, a nod to their work as a freight carrier business. The gift includes additional recognition of the family’s generosity throughout the building.

Once complete in spring 2023, the Wonder Tower will bring world-class pediatric facilities to Central Virginia. Located in downtown Richmond, the 16-story tower will be home to CHoR’s Level 1 pediatric trauma center, emergency room, inpatient units, new operating rooms, increased imaging capacity, and family amenities — all in an environment created just for kids and their loved ones.

“The children’s tower is being built for and by our community thanks to generous friends like the Estes,” said Elias Neujahr, CEO of CHoR. “It will be a beacon of hope for kids and families across the Commonwealth while helping us attract and retain top talent so our children have access to be the best care, close to home.”

In 2021, Estes Express Lines will celebrate its 90th anniversary as CHoR finishes its centennial year. “Let’s all come together to support the Wonder Tower, a special place where all families and children can receive exceptional pediatric care, right here in Richmond,” said Estes.

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