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Preview: Kickers vs. Ottawa

The Kickers game is happening. The weather forecast dramatically improved over the week so it might be a little wet but not life-threatening.

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Opponent: Ottawa Fury FC (11-13-5)
Date/Time:
 Saturday, Sept. 15th – 7 PM
Weather Forecast from Weather.com:

THREE THINGS TO KICK ABOUT

  1. Moving on Down – The USL doesn’t follow the English model of promotion and regulation between the various leagues. That won’t stop the Richmond Kicker from dropping out of USL D2 down to D3 next year. The reason is money. The Kickers don’t have enough. Details with a more positive spin here.
  2. Not Good – The team currently has a -37 goal differential. Top of the table Cincinnati has +30 goal differential. Then next closest team to the Kickers, Toronto FC has a -28 goal.
  3. There’s a chance – According the USL website’s League Standings the Kickers are not mathematically eliminated from the playoffs yet. I have neither the desire or the math skills to figure out how that is possible.

PREDICTION

Last home game I predicted a 3-0 loss for the Kickers. I was wrong. The Kickers loss by an impressive, I’ve never seen something quite as horrific 6-0. Things will get better this week. I don’t see them losing by as much.

Kickers 1 – Ottawa 3

My Home Games W/L prediction record to date: 50% correct

KICKERS OFFICIAL PREVIEW

The Richmond Kickers (6-18-4) return home to City Stadium after a three-match road trip to host Ottawa Fury FC (11-13-5) and Oktoberfest presented by the Hof. The party starts at 5:30 p.m. with authentic German oompah music by The Sauerkrauts, stein-hoisting competition, and seasonal craft beers on tap.Then, the Kickers will take on Ottawa at 7:00 p.m. Tickets are on sale now at RichmondKickers.com.

Saturday night’s match will be the fourth meeting between the two clubs, with Richmond looking for their first victory as Ottawa has taken a victory in all of the prior meetings. Just a month prior, the Kickers made the trek to TD Place Stadium, falling to the Fury 0-2 on August 15. Carl Haworth put the home side ahead after eight minutes, scoring on a free kick just outside the Richmond box. Steevan Dos Santos pounced on a loose ball and squared a pass to Tony Taylor in the 84th minute to double the Ottawa lead late.

Richmond will look to bounce back after a narrow 1-2 defeat on the road at the hands of the Charlotte Independence Saturday night. Alex Martinez slotted a ball through for Éamon Zayed in the fifth minute to put the Independence ahead early in the match. A mistake by Trevor Spangenberg in the 58th minute allowed Jake Areman to get the second goal for Charlotte. Raul Gonzalez was able to pull a goal back for the Kickers in the 72nd minute, when Prince Agyemang fed the ball through for Yudai Imura. As he was going to be tackled, Imura laid the ball off for Gonzalez to run onto and get the goal.

Ottawa is coming off a thrilling 4-3 road victory over Toronto FC II last Thursday night. Tony Taylor opened the scoring after just four minutes for Ottawa. Cristian Portilla scored a second for the Fury in the 37th minute. Toronto leveled the score in the 47th minute with goals coming from Jon Bakero and Tsubasa Endoh. Thomas Meilleur-Giguère put Ottawa ahead again in the 69th minute, just as Toronto would draw level again through Jordan Hamilton from the penalty spot five minutes later. Adonijah Reid netted the game winner for Ottawa in the 78th minute to seal all three points for the visitors.

The Kickers are back on the road next Saturday night, heading down to Florida to take on the Tampa Bay Rowdies September 22. Four days later, the Kickers return to City Stadium to host the Eastern Conference leading FC Cincinnati and Cider Fest. The festivities start at 5:30 p.m. with live music, RVA food trucks, and Happy Hour specials on over 20 ciders and craft beers. Kickoff for the game is at 7:00 p.m. Both matches will be available live on WTVR CBS 6.3 (Comcast 206, Verizon FiOS 466) and streaming online on ESPN+. Tickets for the FC Cincinnati match are on sale now at RichmondKickers.com.

PLAYERS TO WATCH

Richmond: Midfielder Raul Gonzalez (#27) has scored in two-straight matches, bringing his tally for the season to three goals and one assist. The University of Memphis product is in his second season in Richmond has five goals and two assists over 49 appearances. Midfielder Yudai Imura (#14) picked up his first assist of the season, to go with his two goals this season. A native of Tokyo, Japan, Imura signed with the Kickers after a successful tryout in 2015 and has gone on to make 92 appearances over four seasons, scoring 15 goals and adding five assists. Midfielder Brandon Eaton (#25) slotted into the right back role last Saturday night, and contributed seven tackles and a passing accuracy of 80%. Eaton is in his second professional season, after making one appearance for the Kickers in 2017.

Ottawa: Forward Carl Haworth (#9) added his third assist of the season last Thursday in Ottawa’s 4-3 victory on the road against Toronto FC II. The Canadian international scored his second goal of the season in the last meeting between these two clubs August 15. Forward Tony Taylor (#99) leads Ottawa with five goals this season in 27 games, including a goal in their last outing against Toronto. Taylor joined the Fury after spending the 2017 season with the Jacksonville Armada where he scored three goals in 12 games. Goalkeeper Maxime Crépeau (#16) is tied for first in the USL for clean sheets this season with 12, along with Matt Pickens at Nashville SC. On loan from the Montréal Impact, Crépeau made three league appearances and four Canadian Championship appearances for the first team in 2017.

TABLE

There are 16 teams in the Eastern Conference, somehow the Kickers are not sitting at the absolute bottom and still have a good chance of not being the absolute worst team in the East.

TICKET DEAL

It’s Oktoberfest, presented by The Hof, at City Stadium on Saturday, September 15!

The party starts at 5:30 p.m. with authentic German oompah music by The Sauerkrauts and seasonal craft beers on tap! Then, get loud with the Red Army when the Kickers take the field to take on Ottawa!

GET TICKETS

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Richard Hayes is the co-founder of RVAHub. When he isn't rounding up neighborhood news, he's likely watching soccer or chasing down the latest and greatest board game.

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Tips for Using the River Safely

As the temperature climbs so does river usage and not everyone is well-versed in river safety.

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The following advice was submitted by avid whitewater boater Teresa Ann.

Here in Richmond, we have the great pleasure of easy access to the James River. Oftentimes, we feel confident that nothing can go wrong in the flatwater sections or in the relatively “easy” upper James section from Pony to Reedy.

As summer approaches and many folks are headed to the James to relax, kayak, paddle board, canoe, or tube, we need to be sure that some very important guidelines are followed by ALL, not just the whitewater boating community.

Too often, rescues are necessary, and they almost always involve recreational users who are not familiar with the river. The James is NOT a fun lazy river ride like at the parks. We can’t turn it off when things go south that users aren’t prepared for. I’ve found most recreational users only understand the large changes in river level but not the differences between 6ft and 8ft which are not easy to notice for an untrained idea but actually huge and dangerous.

  1. As you all may know, a man died on Monday at Z Dam and on Sunday, a young woman died on the Balcony Falls section further upstream. There were several factors at play here in both deaths. But most noticeable, neither was wearing a PFD. I’m sharing this information to educate not intimidate, and I hope you all will help spread the word.
    All kayakers, paddle boarders, and river users (swimmers, tubers, etc) should use a PFD (personal flotation device. AKA: life jacket) whenever they are participating in water sports. While it is only legally required when the river is over 5ft, it’s a best practice to always wear one. Almost every death on this river involved a person who was NOT wearing a PFD. Accidents are just that – not intentional and unexpected. Your life jacket does no good on the back of your boat if you accidentally end up in the water. Even swimmers should be using PFDs. Several times a year there are swimmers drowning at levels under 5ft.
  2. When doing the Upper or Lower section (anywhere between Pony and 14th Street), all kayakers should be wearing a whitewater approved helmet. Not a bike helmet.
  3. Our river is a rocky bottom river, and while largely friendly geographically (no undercuts, major sieves, etc) there are still deadly features at all water levels – including strainers (woodpiles) and dams.
  4. This brings me to the next point. Low head dams are deadly. Never, ever go over a low head dam. We have several – Z dam, Williams Dam (other side of Williams island from Z), Vepco Levee, Boshers.  All are deadly. Avoid dams at all costs. Always portage (walk and carry your boat) around a dam.Watch this video for more information about low head dams:
  5. Know the river level. It can be found at this website:  https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/hydrograph.php?gage=rmdv2&wfo=akqUnder five feet is the best level for beginners on flat water and the upper. Hazards still exist. For instance, more rocks are out which actually leads to more kayak and boat flips, resulting in more people in the water unexpectedly (did I mention you should always wear a life jacket regardless of level?)Over five and under nine varies greatly. I can’t go into the complexities here. Here are some general rules.Inexperienced boaters should generally not be on the James River over 6ft. Flows increase quickly making self-rescue more difficult and swims much longer. Just this weekend, I watched two inexperienced recreational kayakers (sit on tops) on the upper at 7.9ft with no PFD and bike helmets. One flipped and pinned his boat. He had to swim off the river. His boat came loose after an hour. It was too heavy to flip over. He was nearing hypothermia as we got out after a mile swim. Another rec boat is still pinned under the Powhite bridge.Between 6-9 is all very different. It gets faster. Rocks disappear, but hydraulics form where rocks once were. Most will let you out eventually, but not all of them. There is at least one “terminal hole” on the lower section once the river gets to 7.5+Over nine feet is minor flooding and no one but advanced whitewater paddlers should be on the river at any point.
  6. Know the river temperature. https://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?02035000You need a combined water and air temp of 120 to not become hypothermic. Most experienced white water boaters are still wearing dry gear when water and air temps are at 120. Cold water contributes to drowning. While 60 may feel warm in the air, water is another beast. Remember your body maintains a 98 degree norm. 60 and even 70 degree water shocks the system. Always dress for a swim. Cotton kills. It cools the body when wet and is heavy. Never boat in cotton.
  7. Always carry safety gear, including a throw rope to help if someone needs a rescue. But you have to learn how to properly use a throw rope because ropes on the river can be an entrapment issue.
  8. NEVER STAND UP IN MOVING WATER. If you are floating down stream because you’ve been flipped off your board, boat or tube, putting your feet down could lead to a deadly foot entrapment. Always float “Nose and Toes” nose points downstream and toes above the water. Float in your back or actively swim on your stomach. Never stand up.

https://www.nrs.com/safety_tips/footentrapment.asp

I’m probably missing some stuff but these are basics. I would encourage anyone thinking of kayaking to take a swift water rescue class to learn how to rescue in the river. Someday, you may be glad you did.

Editor’s Note: To address some of the concerns Teresa has put up some homemade signs seen above and in the header image. The Parks Department is hoping to have permanent signage up at Huguenot Flatwater over the weekend. They are also planning to reinstall buoys but have to wait for the right water levels. They continually get washed away after high water events. Additional signage should be coming on the river as well and new portage signage on the island.

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Black Bear’s Visit to Richmond Comes to a Safe End

No picnic baskets, bears, dogs, cats, or humans were harmed in today’s adventure.

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A black bear decided to explore Richmond today. First spotted on the Northbank Trail he later headed into town. Previous reports earlier in the week had the bear up near Pony Pasture. The picture above is from RACC Instagram which reported on the sedation and transportation of the bear.

We just received a call about a bear-and it really was a bear. Sometimes we laugh and arrive on scene with a giant Rottweiler, but nope-this was a real bear. We named him Fuzzy Wuzzy. Shout out to @richmondpolice for helping keep us safe and to @virginiawildlife for tranquilizing and relocating the bear out of the City!

Bear on Northbank this morning! from r/rva

Here he is in town.

Bear at Byrd and 5th from r/rva

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Critters of the Week

A wild critter we spotted in the RVA area and a critter up for adoption by SPCA or RACC.

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Where Spotted: Bryan Park
Common Name: Blue Jay
Scientific Name: Cyanocitta cristata
Length: 8.7 – 12 in.
Weight: 2.3 – 3.8 oz
Wingspan: 13–17 in

Quick Facts (Courtesy of the Cornell Lab)

  • Thousands of Blue Jays migrate in flocks along the Great Lakes and Atlantic coasts, but much about their migration remains a mystery. Some are present throughout winter in all parts of their range. Young jays may be more likely to migrate than adults, but many adults also migrate. Some individual jays migrate south one year, stay north the next winter, and then migrate south again the next year. No one has worked out why they migrate when they do.
  • The Blue Jay frequently mimics the calls of hawks, especially the Red-shouldered Hawk. These calls may provide information to other jays that a hawk is around, or may be used to deceive other species into believing a hawk is present.
  • Tool use has never been reported for wild Blue Jays, but captive Blue Jays used strips of newspaper to rake in food pellets from outside their cages.
  • The pigment in Blue Jay feathers is melanin, which is brown. The blue color is caused by scattering light through modified cells on the surface of the feather barbs.

Kurt Cobain at Richmond SPCA

 

With the food out it’s less dangerous
Here we are meow, entertain us
I feel frisky and outrageous
Here we are meow, entertain us

Age: 8 years, 1 month
Gender: Neutered Male
Color: Orange
Declawed: No
ID: 44163819

Adopt Curt Kobain at Richmond SPCA

Learn more about their adoption process.

To reduce visitor traffic, during the COVID-19 outbreak they are scheduling adoption appointments beginning Tuesday, March 17, 2020. Please leave your phone number in a voicemail or email and an adoption counselor will call to set an appointment for you to meet with a pet. Email the adoption center or call 804-521-1307.

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