Connect with us

Downtown

ART180, Jeanine Harper of Greater Richmond Scan, and Childsavers all to be honored by Voices for Virginia’s Children

Carol S. Fox “Making Kids Count” Award and the Theodore R. Groves Memorial Award will be presented in October.

Avatar

Published

on

The children’s advocacy group Voices for Virginia’s Children honors Virginia individuals and/or groups with the Carol S. Fox Making Kids Count and Theodore R. Groves Memorial Awards.

Locally several groups and one individual are honorees for 2016.

Carol S. Fox “Making Kids Count” Award Honorees:

  • Jeanine Harper, of Richmond,is the Executive Director of Greater Richmond SCAN (Stop Child Abuse Now) for over 16 years.

Jeanine leads SCAN’s staff and volunteers to provide awareness, support, and education to enhance the lives of our most vulnerable children, those at-risk of abuse or neglect or who have been abused and neglected. This past year, Jeanine has built partnerships with local school administrators within the Richmond Public School system to help expanding a trauma informed approach in the division’s Pre-K-12 programs. She has also served as a loaned executive to the Department of Social Services when the number of reported child abuse victims across Virginia topped 50,000.

  • ART 180 located in Jackson Ward, helping at risk youth through art since 1998.

Over their 18 year history, they have served 3,500+ young people in programs fostering creative expression. Most of the participants are from single-parent or non-traditional households, low performing/under-resourced schools, the foster care or juvenile justice system, identify with a diagnosed behavioral challenge, or from the LGBTQ community. By giving youth a voice through the arts they not only speak out for children, but also empower them to speak out for themselves. They help to position young people as agents of change rather than targets of change.

Theodore R. Groves Memorial Award Honorees:

  • ChildSavers, of Greater Richmond, was the first children’s mental health clinic in the South.

ChildSavers’ fundamental commitment is to the mental well-being of children and the formation of a positive bond between children and their care providers. Their clients come from all cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, but most have experienced the hardships of poverty and family turmoil. In the 2014/2015 program year, ChildSavers impacted 14,000 individuals and provided direct service to 2,967 children, family members, and childcare providers. Currently, approximately three-quarters of the children served are African-American while 76% live with families that are at or below 200% of the federal poverty line. In 2014 the Virginia General Assembly passed a resolution recognizing ChildSavers as the only trauma response program in the Commonwealth devoted to immediate response and trauma counseling services for children and acknowledged their long-term commitment to the mental health and developmental needs of children.

The teachers named the new center for Dr. J. Milton Hopkins, a local African-American physician who for years had provided medical care to anyone in need, regardless of ability to pay. From its beginning serving 24 children, Hopkins House has grown to an enrollment of 315 children at three preschools in Northern Virginia.  In addition, the organization collaborates with national, state and local governments on a range of public policy matters affecting children and their families, including health, housing, and education. In collaboration with Northern Virginia Community College, Hopkins House also assists 100 teens and young adults yearly earn professional credentials, college credits, and career placement in the early childhood education field.

The 5th Annual Carol S. Fox Making Kids Count Awards Reception will take place on Wednesday, October 5, 2016 at 6pm at the Bolling Haxall House in Richmond. You can purchase tickets or find out more here.

About Voices for Virginia’s Children:

Voices for Virginia’s Children is the Commonwealth’s only independent, multi-issue child policy and advocacy organization. We are home to the Kids Count Data Center for Virginia, tracking more than 100 indicators of child well-being in each locality over time. Using this data and our independent policy research, we determine unmet needs and threats to child well-being, recommend sound policy solutions, provide objective input to policymakers, and educate and mobilize leaders and concerned citizens to support policy initiatives.

Comments

comments

Richard Hayes is the co-founder of RVAHub. When he isn't rounding up neighborhood news, he's likely watching soccer or chasing down the latest and greatest board game.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Community

Storm Rolls In

Alternative title: “Dumbass Stays on Floodwall too Long Gets Very Wet”. No camera gear or photographers were harmed in the taking of this photo.

Avatar

Published

on

Yesterday a quick-moving storm rolled through Richmond.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Downtown

Must-See RVA! — Cokesbury Building

A look into the history of Richmond places that are still part of our landscape.

Avatar

Published

on

April 2020
  • 415 East Grace Street
  • Built, 1921
  • Architects, Carneal & Johnston

Once there was this trendy little bookstore in the heart of the downtown shopping district.

[ADR] — Cokesbury Building in 1981

[ADR] — Cokesbury Building in 1981

This building was built for the Methodist Publishing House and designed by Garnett & Johnston. Its design clearly is related to the Mosby Store at the corner of Jefferson and Broad Streets, by Starrett & Van Vleck.

April 2020 — showing projecting cornice

April 2020 — showing projecting cornice

That design was, in turn, related to McKim, Mead & White’s Gorham Building in New York, a modernized version of an Italianate palazzo with an arcade at the base of the building and a heavy projecting cornice at the roof.

April 2020

April 2020

This design was felt to be a particularly successful blending of traditional and modern features, most appropriate for a modern shop.

April 2020

April 2020

The Cokesbury Building is designed carefully and well detailed. The first floor arcade was glazed fully, but is now closed partially.

April 2020

April 2020

The interior vaulted ceilings have been removed, but the building is otherwise well preserved. The reason for the popularity of this building type is seen easily. It is simple, dignified and impressive. [ADR]

(Richmond Times Dispatch) — Cokesbury Building in 1952

(Richmond Times-Dispatch) — Cokesbury Building in 1952

The Cokesbury Building, with the Cokesbury Bookstore on the first floor, was an outgrowth of the Methodist Episcopal Book Concern. Created in 1789, this organization was established to religious materials for the Methodist church. It would eventually expand to include books and religious supplies and rebranded as the Cokesbury Press in 1925. By 2012, there would be 57 Cokesbury Book Stores nationwide, one of which used to be on Grace Street.

April 2020

April 2020

But in that same year, Cokesbury announced the closure of their brick-and-mortar stores, and today they’re online only. The Grace Street location had long been abandoned by that point, having relocated to Tuckernuck Square shopping center in 1992. A loss, really. They were more than just religious books and often had unusual or hard to find titles, back in the days before Amazon.

Today, it’s the Cokesbury Building Apartments.

(Cokesbury Building is part of the Atlas RVA! Project)


Print Sources

  • [ADR] Architecture in Downtown Richmond. Robert Winthrop. 1982.

rocket_werks_must_see

Must-See RVA! is a regular series
appearing on rocket werks – check it out!

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Community

Suspects Sought in Credit Card Fraud

Avatar

Published

on

From RPD:

Richmond Police detectives need the public’s help to identify the individuals in the attached photo, who are suspected of using a stolen credit to make fraudulent purchases last week.

On Monday, March 30, the victim was notified that their card had been used at the Farm Fresh located in the 2300 block of East Main Street. Surveillance footage shows two females buying food and cigarettes worth over $400 with the victim’s card. They were last seen leaving the store in a silver convertible with a black top. A photo of the vehicle is attached.

Detectives determined the card was also used at the McDonald’s located in the 1800 block of East Broad Street.

Anyone with information about the identity of these suspects is asked to call First Precinct Detective J. Mitchell at (804) 646-0569 or contact Crime Stoppers at (804) 780-1000 or at www.7801000.com. The P3 Tips Crime Stoppers app for smartphones may also be used. All Crime Stoppers methods are anonymous.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Richmond Weather

Events Calendar