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Education

Virginia‘s Community Colleges announce expansion of credits for prior learning and life experiences

Part of Lumina Foundation’s ‘All Learning Counts’ initiative, under the program, any adult learner can earn college credits for life experiences.

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Virginia’s Community Colleges, the umbrella organization of Virginia’s community college system, have launched an expanded version of the organization’s Credits2Careers portal, allowing more adult learners to be aware they may be eligible for college credit based on their prior learning and experience.

Before the expansion, the Credits2Career portal only served individuals with military experience, translating their service into college credits.

The expansion of the portal, which includes statewide curriculum crosswalking, is made possible due to a generous grant from the Lumina Foundation as part of its All Learning Counts Initiative. In 2019, the Foundation awarded $3.5 million in grants to nine organizations across the nation committed to building clearer pathways to degrees and other credentials for adults.

Virginia’s Community Colleges was one of the nine recipients, and the only recipient from Virginia.

“Learning can take place in all kinds of settings, especially today, as many individuals have hybrid work models allowing for increased flexibility,” said Randall Stamper, assistant vice chancellor for grants and workforce programs at the community college system. “Whether it’s in the military, on the job or in an exam, Virginians deserve to be credited for their learning, even the learning taking place outside of a classroom.”

The grant has enabled Virginia’s Community Colleges to correlate military training, professional development, workforce and career certifications to courses within its course catalog, allowing all adult learners to jumpstart their paths to a college degree by earning college credit for certain life experiences without having to start the education process at ground zero.

Credits2Careers and the All Learning Counts initiative aim to make the path to a degree more easily obtained. By validating experiences and learning out of the classroom, adult learners will get their degree faster and for less out of pocket, lowering the bar for individuals to seek out and complete a postsecondary education.

“Applying and enrolling in school can be daunting, especially for adults juggling a family and a job, but the launch of the new Credits2Careers portal makes it easier to see how many credits an individual has and what they need to show to cash them in,” said Jenny Carter, director of workforce partnerships and projects. “We’re grateful to the Lumnina Foundation for helping make this effort a reality, and we’re even more grateful that Virginia adult learners are one step closer to accessible education.”

Individuals looking to explore the Credits to Careers portal can create an account at Credits2Careers.org.

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Trevor Dickerson is the Editor and Co-Founder of RVAHub.

Education

University of Richmond awarded $625K HHMI grant to study barriers to student inclusivity

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute has awarded the University of Richmond a $625K grant that will support efforts to create an inclusive experience for students and enhance student belonging.

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The Howard Hughes Medical Institute has awarded the University of Richmond a $625K grant that will support efforts to create an inclusive experience for students and enhance student belonging.

The HHMI Inclusive Excellence 3 grant is a six-year program and will be led by biology professor Angie Hilliker, who will work with ten additional UR faculty from across STEM disciplines to implement this project.

The program team has three priorities:

  1. Discover barriers to student belonging that exist at UR;
  2. Test interventions to best address these barriers; and
  3. Support faculty with resources and programs to promote inclusivity.

“By listening to and learning from our own students, we aim to drive change from within our classrooms, research groups, and student-faculty organizations, while contributing to the national conversation about inclusive teaching,” said Hilliker.

Part of this grant will fund a study led by faculty in UR’s psychology department who have related expertise in belonging, prejudice and status-related disparities, culture/identity, and psychosocial adjustment among college students.

The UR team will collaborate within a learning community with 14 other universities. The grant allocates $475,000 to fund programs on campus and $150,000 to fund activities in collaboration with the other universities.

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Missing context, political bias: Some of critics’ objections to Virginia’s new history standards

A number of groups are questioning new history and social science standards proposed by Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s administration ahead of a Board of Education meeting to begin reviewing them Thursday.

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A number of groups are questioning new history and social science standards proposed by Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s administration ahead of a Board of Education meeting to begin reviewing them Thursday.

Critics from diverse communities and lawmakers, most recently in a Nov. 15 letter to the governor and school officials, argue the new standards are missing influential figures and events and voice concern about what they say is a lack of transparency regarding who authored the changes.

The standards will set Virginia’s expectations for student learning in history and social science, which are assessed through the Standards of Learning tests. The Board of Education delayed its first review after Superintendent Jillian Balow requested additional time to correct errors, reorder guidance and allow additional experts to weigh in on the draft.

“Continued review and edits to the standards over the past several months have strengthened the content at each grade level,” wrote Balow in a Nov. 10 letter to the Board of Education. “The edits honor the work done previously by Virginians, and national and state experts.”

Balow also said in her letter that draft curriculum frameworks, which are guides for teachers, will be published later.

However, critics in the Nov. 15 letter said the curriculum frameworks missing from the standards make it “impossible for anybody to effectively evaluate the draft as a whole.”

Among the letter’s signatories are 10 Democratic lawmakers and groups including the Virginia Education Association, the nonprofit Hamkae Center, which describes itself as organizing “Asian Americans to achieve social, economic, and racial justice in Virginia,” the Fairfax County NAACP and the Sikh Coalition. The Virginia Education Association referred inquiries to the Hamkae Center.

They also questioned the number of “problematic content changes that fail to reflect the concerns of our diverse communities” and the involvement of groups such as the Michigan based-Hillsdale College in the review of the standards.

Balow said last month that representatives from other colleges expressed interest in commenting on the draft standards after VPM reported that she was working with the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a conservative educational think tank, to develop the standards.

Here are a few objections to the proposed new standards that educational and other groups have raised.

Missing context

Critics say parts of the new standards lack proper context.

For example, while the standards replace the term “Indian” with “Indigenous people” and require students to study aspects of the groups, they do not mention that Indigenous People’s Day replaced Columbus Day in 1992 because Indigenous people view Christopher Columbus as a colonizer rather than a discoverer.

Additionally, the standards recognize the development of slavery in colonial Virginia but lack an emphasis on the slave trade and tobacco plantations, critics say.

“Nazis” and “The Final Solution,” which are necessary to understand the Holocaust, are also missing from the standards.

“Content is crucial for understanding the Holocaust and other genocides,” said Gail Flax, a retired educator. “You have to know what happened before and what happened afterward to be able to analyze and contextualize history.”

Narrative

With the removal of historical figures and events, critics have questioned the narrative of history the administration is conveying to students.

Zowee Aquino of the Hamkae Center said the revisions reflect “pretty explicit political bias.” She said the standards also have a Eurocentric theme that focuses on European or Anglo-American ideas and disregards the contributions of ethnic minorities in white countries.

For example, the name of Martin Luther King Jr., a civil rights activist, was removed from the elementary school standards. King’s name first appears in the sixth grade standards.

Aquino said there’s no mention of Juneteenth, the Chinese Exclusion Act or Martin Luther King Jr. Day in any of the standards. China and the African civilization of Mali, which have been part of the standards for world culture studies, have also been removed from third grade standards.

The standards also do not include any mention of tribal sovereignty.

Sen. Jennifer McClellan, D-Richmond, said in a letter to the Board of Education that the revised draft deletes “major components of our history and deliberately omits the diverse perspectives that shape our commonwealth and our nation.”

For example, she wrote that the draft omits any discussion of the history or modern-day culture of the Latino community, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders or the LGBTQ community.

“These decisions would mean that hundreds of thousands of Virginia children would not have the opportunity to learn about their community’s contributions to the fabric and history of our nation,” McClellan wrote. “And, all Virginia students would lack a fuller understanding of our country’s history.”

Rejected recommendations

The inclusion of King, the national holiday for the civil rights leader and Juneteenth marking the day when all enslaved Africans became free were several edits recommended by the Virginia Commission on African American History Education, but excluded or generalized in the redraft.

The list of edits excluded include the mention of John Mercer Langston, the first African American congressman from Virginia. The commission’s recommendation that the standards include the phrase that “not everyone was considered a citizen when our country began, and for a long time after that, even until today” was also excluded.

Mention of Indigenous people and their culture being affected by white European colonization was also excluded from the standards, as was the phrase “the Virginia Colony’s economy was greatly dependent upon temporary and permanent servitude.”

Historical errors and inaccuracies

Critics also say the proposed standards have historical errors and inaccuracies.

Specifically, students starting in the fourth grade are required to explain the reasons for the relocation of Virginia’s capital from Jamestown to Williamsburg as part of the Revolutionary War. However, an email from the Virginia Social Studies Leaders Consortium Monday said “this makes absolutely no sense” given Virginia’s capital was moved from Williamsburg to Richmond to provide greater protection against British attack.

Additionally, the group says the standards erroneously convey that Zachary Taylor, who was elected in 1848, was the most recent president from Virginia instead of Woodrow Wilson, who was elected in 1912.

The standards do not explicitly say which president was most recent. The document only states that students starting in the fourth grade will be required to explain the growth of a new America with an emphasis on the role of Virginians by explaining Virginia’s prominence in national leadership, emphasizing its eight presidents from Thomas Jefferson to Zachary Taylor.

“The previous version of the proposed standards did not contain egregious historical errors such as this because they were developed by a team of educators, division leaders and historians,” the consortium wrote.

Age appropriateness

Aquino also questioned whether the revisions are age appropriate.

For example, first and third graders must learn about the Code of Hammurabi, an ancient law text, and Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, under the proposed history standards. She said the history is “pretty dense and intense” and includes details about capital punishment.

However, Charles Pyle, a spokesman with the Virginia Department of Education, said under the standards, first graders will learn where the first civilizations began and third graders will learn about democracy. He said Aurelius is part of a list of suggested examples of mythical and historical figures students could encounter as they “hear, read, and retell stories.”

Open access

With the focus on the amount of work demanded of teachers due to the workforce shortage, critics question a sentence in the preface of the history standards that states teachers should provide all of their instructional materials to parents.

Under the Board of Education’s current regulations, parents have the right to inspect instructional materials used as part of the educational curriculum for students.

Aquino said many reports link teacher burnout with increased work demands and argued another mandate does not help support students.

“It’s a huge task that the new administration is asking them to take on that doesn’t improve instruction,” Aquino said.

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Education

University of Richmond celebrates New Zealand with gumboot throwing, sheep cuddling, and ambassador visit

The annual event celebrating International Education Week this year focuses on our Kiwi friends.

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Richmonders can sample New Zealand cuisine, visit with some sustainably raised sheep, and more at the University of Richmond along with Bede Corry, New Zealand Ambassador to the U.S. next week as the University of Richmond celebrates International Education Week.

The annual program returns at a pre-COVID cadence with events available for the campus and greater community November 14-18. Programming themes for Aotearoa New Zealand Week include the natural world and sustainability, female leadership, indigenous peoples, and sport.

“Aotearoa” is the Maori name for the country.

“This annual tradition has been a valuable way of promoting deeper connection to cultures in the classroom and beyond. UR’s ‘meeting with’ another country during International Education Week emphasizes our commitment to global engagement, dialogue, and cultural exchange,” said International Education Dean Martha Merritt. “Returning to full-scale engagement is exciting as this week provides an opportunity for our campus and greater community to learn together about Aotearoa New Zealand as they return to the world stage after the pandemic.”

This year, scholars and visitors will travel to Richmond from New Zealand and Washington, D.C. to offer their expertise, and faculty have geared their teaching toward intersections with New Zealand. Participants can also participate in a variety of fun and social activities, including attending a Cricket exhibition or trying a BODYPUMP class (the popular fitness class that originated in New Zealand).

Peak programming that is open to the campus and greater community is on Wednesday, Nov. 16, and key events include:

  • Aotearoa New Zealand Fair, 4:30 p.m., Tyler Haynes Commons
    • More than 20 stations will allow attendees to explore a wide variety of community connections to New Zealand, including a business school case study on Allbirds shoes, children’s literature, urban biodiversity, women in STEM fields, and more. Details here.
  • Aotearoa New Zealand Dinner, 6 p.m., Heilman Dining Center
    • Samplings will include lamb chops, Kiwi burger, fish and chips, kumara, and chocolate lamingtons. Full menu here.

Ambassador Corry will be meeting with members of the campus community during a private event.

A full list of events is available here.

Previous years have focused on Chile, India, East Asia, South Africa, and Denmark. Earlier this year, Richmond received the Association of International Education Administrators Innovation Award in Internationalization, recognizing innovative approaches to International Education Week programming during the pandemic.

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We need your help. RVAHub is a small, independent publication, and we depend on our readers to help us provide a vital community service. If you enjoy our content, would you consider a donation as small as $5? We would be immensely grateful! Interested in advertising your business, organization, or event? Get the details here.

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