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Outdoors

Help the James River this Saturday for the Regional Cleanup Day

The James River always needs a little help. This Saturday it will hopefully get a lot of help from volunteers.

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Join the James River Advisory Council in its 22nd year of cleaning up the James River and its shorelines! The cleanup is a cooperative, regional event spanning more than 75 miles of the James River at 13 sites. Walkers, powerboats, paddle craft, and hikers will participate in a limited capacity, social distancing. We hope to see you at one of our various sites throughout the watershed! Volunteers will need to register!

Please remember to dress comfortably (closed toe shoes) bring gloves, masks, trash bags, grabbers, water, insect repellent, sunscreen, and hat (optional).

Some of the localish sites include:

Chesterfield County

  • Dutch Gap Boat Landing and Conservation Area
  • Falling Creek Ironworks Park
  • Falling Creek Reservoir

City of Petersburg

  • Lakemont Neighborhood
  • Pocahontas Island

City of Richmond

  • Ancarrows Landing
  • Belle Isle
  • Brookland Park Boulevard
  • Pony Pasture Rapids

Goochland County

  • Tucker Park at Maiden’s Landing

Henrico County

  • Osborne Park and Boat Landing

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Richard Hayes is the co-founder of RVAHub. When he isn't rounding up neighborhood news, he's likely watching soccer or chasing down the latest and greatest board game.

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Events

Ukrop’s Monument 10K Shows Off this Year’s Shirt

If your New Year’s resolutions included running in the Ukrop’s 10K today would be a good day to register.

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Your first look at the 2022 Ukrop’s participant shirt, designed by Hamilton Glass. Register here to get yours. The price goes up tomorrow January 4th so don’t hesitate if you want to save a few bucks.

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News

RVAH2O Now Giving the People the Straight Poop on Sewer Overflows

This real-time technology and data makes Richmond’s the first “Smart Sewers” in Virginia.

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Full credit to Whit Clements for giving me that headline of this announcement from RVAH2O.

Big Update (and Upgrade!) for Combined Sewer System Overflow Events in Richmond! 📣

Real-time data is now viewable in an interactive map that looks just like the one above so you can know exactly where and when overflows occur (and plan your James River visits accordingly!).

(The map is linked in perpetuity in our bio as “Check for Combined Sewer System Overflow Events Here” but you can also bookmark the link for rainy days!)

Here’s how it works: just hover over (or, on your phone, click on) any of the remaining 25 overflow points in Richmond to see the last time combined flows were discharged—and just like that you’ll be up-to-date!

Red triangles give you a quick notification that there’s been an overflow event in the past 48 hours. 🔺

When you see yellow boxes, that means our team is recalibrating those sensors and meters. 🟨

This up-to-date system will replace the email alerts of the past (which were triggered and automated when it rained 0.1″ at the @richmondairport, which doesn’t always reflect rainfall within city limits).

This new map uses:

  • meters at each outfall to quantify flows
  • rain gauges in Richmond
  • real-time data that’s updated continuously!

This real-time technology and data makes Richmond’s the first “Smart Sewers” in Virginia (we love being trendsetters)! 🧠🌊

And this system will help us to maximize and fully utilize the capacity within our system to prevent overflows and reduce overflow volume!

We know y’all love accurate information and continuous updates, so we hope you’ll love this upgrade and map made for you too!

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Outdoors

Birders Rejoice, You Can Put Your Feeders Back Up But Keep’em Clean

The most important advice to follow if you decide to put your feeder back up is that you need to clean it once a week and disinfect with a 10% bleach solution.

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Earlier this year it was advised to take down all bird feeders due to a unknown disease that was killing many songbirds. Department of Wildlife Resources (DWR) stated that no definitive cause has been determined. The good news is that incidents of the disease, which involved birds exhibiting eye issues (swelling, crusts, discharge, etc.), along with neurological symptoms, have declined to such a point that DWR feels it safe to put your feeders back up.

They posted these guidelines along with the all-clear.

Residents that choose to feed birds or provide water in bird baths should remain vigilant for avian mortalities and consider the following best practice guidelines:

  • Clean feeders and bird baths at least once a week, then disinfect with a 10% bleach solution to prevent potential infectious disease spread between birds and other wildlife. After cleaning, rinse well with water and allow to air dry.
  • Wear disposable gloves when handling bird feeders and baths and wash your hands when finished.
  • When feeding birds, follow expert recommendations, such as those listed in Audubon International’s Guide to Bird Feeding.
  • Keep pets away from sick or dead wild birds.
  • Avoid handling wild birds. If you must do so, wear disposable gloves or place an inverted plastic bag over your hand to avoid direct contact with the bird. Dispose of dead birds in a closed plastic bag in household trash. Alternatively, you may bury bird carcasses at least 3 feet to prevent any disease transmission to scavenging animals.
  • If you observe any additional bird mortalities in Virginia, submit a mortality event to the DWR.

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