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West End

Henrico resident wins year worth of groceries from Kroger as part of vaccine incentive program

The prize is worth approximately $13,000.

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As part of Kroger’s #CommunityImmunity Giveaway, members of Kroger Mid-Atlantic and Kroger Health, the healthcare division of The Kroger Co., presented Stacey Blizzard of Henrico with free groceries for a year, a prize worth approximately $13,000.

The #CommunityImmunity Giveaway initially was announced by the grocer in June as a way to motivate more Americans to get the COVID-19 vaccine to better protect communities across America. The program provided customers and associates with the opportunity to win life-changing prizes, including a chance to win one of five $1 million-dollar checks or groceries for a year to 50 lucky winners. The program culminated in July.

“The #CommunityImmunity Giveaway is a great way for us to motivate people to get the vaccine, and it’s also been a fantastic way to reward our customers and associates,” said Lori Raya, president of Kroger Mid-Atlantic. “The health and safety of everyone we welcome in our stores is our top priority and we’re passionate about doing our part to protect our communities.”

Blizzard is the third Virginian to receive free groceries for a year as a part of the giveaway. Jesse Hamlette, a Kroger associate at Westover Dairy, in Lynchburg, Va. was the first recipient in June and Claire Clasen, a Kroger customer, from Yorktown, Va. received the second groceries for a year prize in July.

The award presentation took place at the Short Pump store at 11895 West Broad Street in Henrico.

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Trevor Dickerson is the co-founder and editor of RVAhub.com, lover of all things Richmond, and a master of karate and friendship for everyone.

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Events

Glen Allen mosque hoping to clear misconception about Islam at community open house this Saturday

“Muslims are opening the doors of our Mosques to our neighbors to provide them with an opportunity to get to know the Muslim community,” said GainPeace Director Dr. Sabeel Ahmed.

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On Saturday, December 4th, a Glen Allen mosque is inviting the community to a Mosque Open House. The purpose of the open house, says the Islamic Center of Richmond, is to address the increase in Islamophobia and to provide an opportunity for the neighbors to get acquainted with Muslim neighbors while at the same time deepening their understanding of the Islamic faith.

Two Muslim organizations are hosting this event: GainPeace and the Islamic center of Richmond Mosque. GainPeace is a national Islamic organization that conducts several educational forums and provides literature and opportunity for our fellow Americans to learn the facts about Islam.

“Muslims are opening the doors of our Mosques to our neighbors to provide them with an opportunity to get to know the Muslim community,” said GainPeace Director Dr. Sabeel Ahmed. “The current political climate has created an environment of mistrust, and also a curiosity in public to learn more about Islam and these Mosque Open Houses will educate them and take any questions on Islam.” Dr. Ahmed added, “The open house will also create opportunities to form alliances between the Muslim-Americans and their neighbors to better the community.”

The Mosques will serve lunch to guests.

The Islamic Center of Richmond is located at 8481 Hungary Road in Glen Allen. The event takes place Saturday, December 4, 11 am to 1:30 pm.

What to expect:

  • The social hour includes Henna design for ladies, face painting for kids, Islamic Artifacts table, Ask Imam Booth, try the Hijab booth, and exclusive VR (Virtual Reality) glasses to let viewers experience Islam in 360 degrees
  • Break for lunch
  • Presentation on Islam, common misconceptions, working together with other faiths, etc.
  • Question and answer session
  • Tour of the Mosque, witnessing of the Congregation Prayer, and gift-giving to guests

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Government

Henrico taps Sheila Minor to lead Department of Finance

Minor comes to Henrico from the city of Colonial Heights, where she has served as finance director since June 2017.

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Henrico County has appointed Sheila S. Minor director of the Department of Finance, effective Saturday, December 18th.

Minor comes to Henrico from the city of Colonial Heights, where she has served as finance director since June 2017.

Prior to her service with Colonial Heights, Minor worked as director of finance for Prince George County and as a budget and revenue analyst for Chesterfield County. She earned a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Public Administration from Virginia Tech. Minor is a certified public accountant, a certified public finance officer, and a certified government finance manager. She and her husband David have two daughters.

“Henrico County is fortunate to have such a truly experienced professional join our ranks,” County Manager John A. Vithoulkas said.

As Henrico’s finance director, Minor will head an agency with more than 160 employees and a budget of $15.1 million for the 2021-22 fiscal year. Finance comprises the divisions of real estate assessment, treasury, management and budget, accounting, purchasing and revenue. Among its scope of duties, the department prepares and administers the county’s operating and capital budgets and Comprehensive Annual Financial Report; reviews, assesses, bills and collects taxes, licenses and fees; assesses real estate and certain personal property; and purchases goods and services for general government departments and Henrico County Public Schools.

Minor also will serve as commissioner of revenue and treasurer for the county, as prescribed by the Code of Virginia.

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Education

University of Richmond ranked as one of “Nation’s Most Environmentally Responsible Colleges” by The Princeton Review

For 12 consecutive years, The Princeton Review has selected the University of Richmond as a top school for environmental stewardship.  

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For 12 consecutive years, The Princeton Review has selected the University of Richmond as a top school for environmental stewardship.

Since 2010, The Princeton Review has released its annual Guide to Green Colleges, which highlights schools with strong commitments to environmentally conscious practices and programs and serves as a resource to college applicants seeking schools with exemplary commitments to the environment and sustainability. The University of Richmond has made the list every year.

“The University of Richmond integrates sustainability across academics and extra-curricular activities to ensure all faculty, staff, and students have an opportunity to participate in practices that improve environmental well-being on our campus,” said Director of Sustainability Rob Andrejewski. “To continually make this list is a testament to the great projects focused on sustainability happening on campus and the broader recognition that they are having an impact.”

The 12-year history of recognition coincides with the development of the University’s Office for Sustainability, which was established in 2009. Recent campus sustainability projects include:

  • Operation of a 120-acre solar facility, which adds 40,000 MWh of fossil-free energy to the electricity grid annually.
  • Electric vehicle charging stations located at a variety of locations on campus, including a new installation near Maryland Hall, help decarbonize transportation.
  • The community garden located in the Eco-Corridor includes more than 30 raised beds available to members of the campus community through a lottery system each year.
  • Goats recently returned to campus for a third time to clear invasive plants along the Eco-Corridor. Goat browsing is an environmentally friendly landscape management practice that reduces the need for herbicide and gas-powered equipment.

The Princeton Review’s Green College Guide is released each October, and schools are selected based on data from student surveys about the influence of sustainability issues on their education and life on campus; administration and student support for environmental awareness and conservation efforts; and the visibility and impact of student environmental groups.

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