Connect with us
[adrotate banner="51"]

Politics

Democratic Primary is Today

Get out there and participate in electing your political leaders.

Published

on

The Republicans have already tapped Glenn Youngkin, a political newcomer with a ton of cash as the GOP gubernatorial candidate. Today it’s the Democrat’s turn to pick their candidate for Governor and other officials.

Five candidates are competing for the nomination as governor in Tuesday’s primary, with former Gov. Terry McAuliffe seen as the heavy favorite. McAuliffe’s opponents include state Sen. Jennifer McClellan and former Del. Jennifer Carroll Foy.

Polls will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. If you are in line at 7 p.m., you will get to vote. Voters heading to the polls on Tuesday are strongly encouraged to wear a mask, although it is not required.

Not sure where your polling location is or if you’re registered go here to get the information.

Full list of statewide candidates

Governor

Five Democrats are vying for the nomination to succeed Gov. Ralph Northam, who is limited to one term:

Lieutenant Governor

Seven Democrats are running to succeed Justin Fairfax:

Attorney General

Del. Jerrauld C. ‘Jay’ Jones takes on incumbent Mark R. Herring.

Comments

comments

Richard Hayes is the co-founder of RVAHub. When he isn't rounding up neighborhood news, he's likely watching soccer or chasing down the latest and greatest board game.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Politics

City Council Votes to Roll the Dice on a Second Casino Referendum Doubling Down with Tax Cuts

Is anybody looking forward to months of casino referendum ads again?

Published

on

In November the voters of Richmond rejected the referendum that would allow a casino to be built in South Side Richmond. The vote was close, at 51% against 49% for and broke down on racial lines. Black neighborhoods and voters were heavily in favor of the casino.

Last night the vote wasn’t close. Only Councilwoman Katherine Jordan voted against the measure to put the One Casino Referendum back on the table. The casino would still be built near Commerce Road and Walmsley Boulevard.

Outspoken former 6th District City Council candidate and anti-casino activist Allan-Charles Chipman summed up the situation thusly:
“The passage of this legislation would defy the expressed will of the people in Richmond. It is a frequent tactic of casinos once they lose any democratic referendum to try and break the will of the people with consecutive referendums…While double or nothing is an acceptable tool for someone who lost a bet in the casino, it is not an acceptable option for the members of this body who lost a bet on a casino.”

To sweeten the pot, Mayor Stoney is promising a 2-cent reduction to the city’s real estate tax rate if and only if the referendum passes. The hope being that the promised tax revenue from the casino would fill any budget gaps. The Mayor is betting that the casino will keep paying out long after the “newness” shine has worn off.

As with all proposals, the $600 million One Casino proposal promises a lot, $30 million in annual tax revenue, 1,500 jobs, and an immediate $25 million payment if the measure passes.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Downtown

Governor’s race draws $11 million total in first-quarter fundraising

The 13 candidates running for the Virginia executive mansion raised a total of over $11 million in three months, according to recently released finance reports. 

Published

on

By Noah Fleischman

The 13 candidates running for the Virginia executive mansion raised a total of over $11 million in three months, according to recently released finance reports.

The candidates had more than $18 million in cash on hand in the first quarter, according to finance report data reported by the Virginia Public Access Project. Cash on hand is tracked as accessible money and in-kind donations, which include non-cash gifts such as goods, services and expertise.

Four candidates running for governor each logged more than $2 million in cash on hand.

Stephen Farnsworth, director of the Center for Leadership and Media Studies at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, said it’s uncommon to have that many candidates with large amounts of money on hand.

“It’s rare to have that many people running for governor,” Farnsworth said. “And it’s even rarer still for there to be so many candidates with bank accounts at that level.”

Former Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe had the largest war chest of any candidate, clocking in with more than $8.5 million cash on hand. Republican candidates and businessmen Glenn Youngkin and Pete Snyder trailed McAuliffe with just over $3.6 million and $2.6 million cash on hand, respectively.

McAuliffe also led all candidates in the most money raised from January to March, bringing in more than $4.1 million. Reported loans and in-kind donations are not included in cash raised totals reported by Capital News Service.

“He’s the only candidate who has been governor previously,” Farnsworth said of the advantage McAuliffe has in the Democratic race. “He has experience in statewide elections, as well as with the national Democratic Party, which has created a lot of fundraising opportunities.”

Former Del. Jennifer Carroll Foy, D-Woodbridge, rounded out the top four candidates, with more than $2.3 million cash on hand. She trailed Youngkin and McAuliffe and ranked third in fundraising in the first quarter, logging more than $1.8 million. Carroll Foy edged out Snyder, who raised over $1.3 million.

Del. Kirk Cox, R-Colonial Heights, reported more than $321,000 cash on hand and Sen. Amanda Chase, R-Midlothian, recorded just over $205,000. Cox ranked third in fundraising for Republicans, bringing in more than $376,000, while Chase logged more than $116,000 in donations.

Republican candidate Sergio de la Pena, a retired U.S. Army colonel and former deputy assistant secretary of defense for Western Hemisphere affairs, checked in between Cox and Chase, raising more than $202,000.

Candidates serving in the General Assembly could not start fundraising until the session ended.

Farnsworth also said Democratic candidates have more cash on hand because the party is holding a primary, unlike the Republicans, who are using a convention to nominate a candidate.

“The Democrats are going with a primary, which involves a great deal of effort to connect with voters across the commonwealth,” Farnsworth said. “When you’re running in a convention, money may be less important.

Del. Lee Carter, D-Manassas, logged just over $100,000 cash on hand and Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax had just shy of $100,000. Carter raised more than $154,000 with over $93,000 of it from cash donations of $100 or less. Fairfax raised almost $27,000.

In the lieutenant governor race, Del. Sam Rasoul, D-Roanoke, led the pack of 13 candidates with more than $960,000 cash on hand. Del. Mark Levine, D-Alexandria, followed Rasoul with just north of $605,000 on hand.

Rasoul also edged out his Democrat opponents in fundraising with over $620,000, followed by Norfolk City Council member Andria McClellan who brought in over $365,00.

Two former Republican delegates are vying for lieutenant governor and both started without cash on hand in January. Winsome Sears, a former Republican delegate from Winchester, outraised former Del. Tim Hugo, R-Fairfax, in the quarter, recording more than $160,000 in donations. Hugo brought in over $103,000.

Attorney General Mark Herring, a Democrat vying for his third term in the position, led the six candidates. He reported more than $1.3 million cash on hand. Del. Jay Jones, D-Norfolk, recorded just over $1 million, second-most of the candidates.

Herring outraised Jones in the first quarter as well, logging more than $624,000, while Jones raised more than $456,000.

Del. Jason Miyares, R-Virginia Beach, logged the most of the four Republican attorney general candidates, with more than $429,000 cash on hand. Miyares raised more than $190,000 in the first quarter. He is trailed by Republican contender Jack White, who raised over $153,00. White is an ordained minister and Army veteran.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Downtown

Mayor Stoney claims victory, Councilwoman Gray concedes in Richmond mayoral race as unofficial results show widening lead

Stoney currently leads the popular vote by about 32,000 ballots with 38% of the vote, winning Districts 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 9. Results still need to be certified.

Published

on

Incumbent mayor Levar Stoney claimed victory in his bid for reelection Wednesday during a news conference. With just over 100,000 ballots counted, unofficial results show Stoney taking six of nine council districts – more than the five needed to secure a win and avoid a runoff with the second runner up. Right now, Councilwoman Kimberly Gray and Alexsis Rodgers are neck and neck for second place with approximately 26% of the vote each.

Stoney currently leads the popular vote by about 32,000 ballots with 38% of the vote, winning Districts 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 9. Results may not be certified until early next week, according to the city registrar.

Stoney declared victory in a tweet thanking supporters on Wednesday, while Gray gave a concession-type statement via test message to VPM reporter Roberto Roldan. Rodgers, meanwhile, refused to concede, citing thousands of ballots that still need to be counted.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Richmond Weather