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Be Amazed at “Bob and the Mighty Wurlitzer” – Stencil Process Video

Several copies of this painting will be auctioned off to support the restoration of the Byrd Theater house organ.

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More information from the Byrd Theater.

Nils Westergard, (@NilsRVA) is a Richmond, VA based street artist, whose work can be found across the US, Europe and Australia. Bob Gulledge, house organist for the Byrd Theatre and Westergard have formed quite a connection over the last year. Gulledge saw Westergard working on a mural behind the Byrd Theatre. He commented “I didn’t want to interrupt his painting, so I looked him up and reached out.” Westergard replied, “What took you so long to call.” Thus, a friendship kindled, and a plan hatched.

Stacy Shaw, Executive Director of the Byrd Theatre, said, “The generous donation of these pieces of art by Nils Westergard and the partnership between he and the Byrd are an amazing gift. We are so excited to watch him work and to see the culmination of his weeks of prep work. His gift will allow us to continue our restoration work on the organ, so she continues to entertain audiences for many more years.”

The work culminated in the actual painting day, March 15th, 2021 at the Byrd Theatre. Westergard was able to get about 8 original paintings out of the stencils he has created. These originals will be for sale and the proceeds will benefit the Mighty Wurlitzer Organ at the Byrd Theatre. Westergard’s paintings typically start at $8,000-$10,000. If interested in purchasing, please contact the Byrd at [email protected] All proceeds will go to support the Byrd Theatre Mighty Wurlitzer Organ.

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Richard Hayes is the co-founder of RVAHub. When he isn't rounding up neighborhood news, he's likely watching soccer or chasing down the latest and greatest board game.

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Richmond Chess Club Hosting Kid’s Chess this Saturday

A great chance to learn about or get better at chess.

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The Richmond Chess Club meets throughout the city every week for games. Often at breweries and bars so naturally it’s usually adults. This weekend their mixing it up and hoping to attract a younger set.

From Facebook

Excited to announce our first kid’s club meetup!

We’ll be at the Richmond Public Library (101 East Franklin) on Saturday at 1:00-5:00.

It will be a workshop environment with some of our coaches helping out teaching basic principles and ideas. And of course there will be plenty of time for casual games between students.

Open for kids (and parents) of all ages and it’s completely free. Masks required. Let us know if you can make it! We plan to do this every other Saturday going forward.

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A Short Tale of Two Basketball Programs: VUU = No Spectators Due to Covid19 VS. VCU = Bring Your Unvaccinated Baby for Chance at $529

VCU has a form for parents to fill out so that their child can race other babies as part of a halftime promotion.

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Two local colleges are taking vastly different approaches to deal with the latest surge in Covid-19 Omicron cases.

Virginia Union University has decided the risk to their students and fans is too great and has closed all basketball games to spectators. They made the following statement on January 3rd.

Virginia Union University Athletics has announced that there will be a new “No Fan/Spectator” policy for its men’s and women’s basketball games in Barco-Stevens Hall until further notice.

Student-athlete and campus safety is the main concern and reason for the temporary policy. The University is committed to implementing and maintaining a range of measures to help promote health and well-being among students, employees, and campus visitors and to help reduce risk from potential exposure and spread of COVID-19.

Only essential personnel will be permitted in Barco-Stevens Hall, which includes participating team members, coaches, officials, athletic trainers, scorer’s table personnel and administrative staff.

Virginia Commonwealth University on the other hand has continued to allow fans but kept a loosely enforced mask mandate.

VCU has decided to increase the difference between the two programs by hosting a “Diaper Derby”. In case you are unfamiliar, a Diaper Derby involves letting young children crawl a set distance and the winner collects a prize, in this case, $529 for college. The twist is that the Covid vaccination is currently not available for any person under the age of 5, so none of the babies will be vaccinated.

January 12th CNN reported on the surge in Covid cases among children.

Covid-19 hospitalization rates among children are soaring in the United States, with an average of 4.3 children under 5 per 100,000 hospitalized with an infection as of the week ending January 1, up from 2.6 children the previous week, according to data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

This represents a 48% increase from the week ending December 4, and the largest increase in hospitalization rate this age group has seen over the course of the pandemic.

“For our youngest children, those who are not yet eligible for vaccination, it’s critically important that we surround them with people who are vaccinated to provide them protection,” CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said Friday.

Here is what VCU Athletics tweeted out last night.

The fact that college athletics is going on at all is a debate for another time.

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Senate panel shoots down bill that would make mask and vaccine mandates illegal

Democrats in the Virginia Senate voted down GOP legislation Monday that would have classified mask mandates and vaccine requirements as illegal discrimination.

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Democrats in the Virginia Senate voted down GOP legislation Monday that would have classified mask mandates and vaccine requirements as illegal discrimination.

The measures, proposed by Sen. Amanda Chase, R-Chesterfield, drew unanimous support from Republicans on the Senate’s General Laws Committee.

“It’s time to give people the freedom to breathe and the freedom of choice,” Chase told the panel.

Her bills would have prevented schools, businesses and other public places from requiring people to wear masks or disclose their vaccine status.

Witnesses who spoke in support of the legislation said they opposed masks for a variety of reasons. One mother told lawmakers that masks gave her child nightmares. One man said that masks gave him seizures. A third witness said masks made her dizzy.

“We are being discriminated against,” said Doris Knicks, who spoke to the panel remotely.

On vaccines, Sen. Siobhan Dunnavant, R-Henrico, a practicing OBGYN, called it “egregious and a complete violation of an individual’s right to privacy” for businesses like restaurants to require proof of a COVID-19 vaccine.

“We shouldn’t be using this as a litmus test for people to be able to get into stores,” she said.

Democrats on the panel noted vaccine requirements are not unique to COVID-19 and said businesses should have the authority to take steps to keep their employees safe.

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