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UR’s Chief Information Officer Keith McIntosh wins national CIO excellence award

The University of Richmond’s Chief Information Officer and Vice President for Information Services Keith W. McIntosh has received the 2020 CapitalCIO of the Year ORBIE Award for education and nonprofit organizations.

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The University of Richmond’s Chief Information Officer and Vice President for Information Services Keith W. McIntosh has received the 2020 CapitalCIO of the Year ORBIE Award for education and nonprofit organizations.

Presented annually since 1998 by CapitalCIO, the CIO of the Year ORBIE Awards is the premier technology executive recognition program in the United States, honoring chief information officers who have demonstrated excellence in technology leadership.  

ORBIE award winners were selected for their exceptional leadership innovation, vision, and engagement in industry and community endeavors.

I am humbled and honored to receive this recognition,” said McIntosh. “This is a testament to those around me. This includes my wonderful Information Services team who work tirelessly each and every day to provide outstanding services and support for our students, faculty, and staff.”

In his role as UR’s CIO since 2016, McIntosh is responsible for the day-to-day management and strategic development of the university’s Information Services.

Prior to joining the University of Richmond, he was the associate vice president for Digital Instruction and Information Services and CIO at Ithaca College and vice chancellor for Information Technology and CIO at Pima County Community College District. He held progressive leadership and management positions within IT during his distinguished 24.5-year service in the United States Air Force, including a tour in Northern Iraq.

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Schools can opt for remote learning during inclement weather

Virginia lawmakers insisted there will still be snow days for public school students, though the General Assembly recently passed legislation allowing unscheduled remote learning during inclement weather. 

Capital News Service

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By Sarah Elson

Virginia lawmakers insisted there will still be snow days for public school students, though the General Assembly recently passed legislation allowing unscheduled remote learning during inclement weather.

“I have heard this bill referred to as ‘the killer of snow day dreams,’” said Alan Seibert, superintendent of Salem City Schools, during a subcommittee meeting. “That’s not the case.”

Lawmakers passed two identical bills stating school divisions can opt for virtual learning during severe weather conditions and emergency situations that result in the cancellation of in-person classes.

Remote learning or distance education is when the instructor and student are separated by location and do not physically meet.

“I would like to emphasize that this is not a bill to eliminate snow days but simply provide some flexibility to school systems,” said Del. Joseph McNamara, R-Roanoke, who introduced House Bill 1790. Sen. David Suetterlein, R-Roanoke, introduced Senate Bill 1132, an identical bill. The bills had strong support in both chambers, though they each moved through the Senate with unanimous support.

 “As you know this pandemic has made us think outside the box and some benefit has come from this thinking,” said Mark Miear, superintendent of Montgomery County Public Schools in the New River Valley, during the House subcommittee meeting.

Public schools must offer 180 days or 990 hours of instruction each year or receive a reduction in state aid, according to Virginia law. School districts typically build in extra snow days for inclement weather. If those days are used up, schools must make up days to meet the required instruction time. The bills also allow schools to make up missed instruction by scheduling a remote learning day.

Both bills state that no school division can use more than 10 unscheduled remote learning days in a school year unless the superintendent of public instruction grants an extension.

 “I’m really glad that the state is allowing this type of [learning] to happen in the 21st century, because it’ll allow us to be able to have days that actually count toward that 990 hours,” said Max Smith, assistant director of operations at Maggie L. Walker Governor’s School in Richmond.

Miear said unscheduled remote learning days will allow the school district to set an end date for the school year and schedule summer programs. Some districts can miss 17-20 days for inclement weather, Miear said. The updated policy will allow for instruction to be “more consistent.”

Moving to online learning during inclement weather will not make up for lost education, Owen Hughes, a permanent substitute teacher at Elmont Elementary School in Ashland, stated in a text message.

“Remote teaching only truly takes place when there is remote learning,” Hughes stated. “This means that if students are disengaged and not learning, teachers aren’t teaching they’re just talking and staying busy.”

Smith said that it will be easy to implement remote learning days because Maggie L. Walker Governor’s School has been teaching students through virtual learning. The school provided some students with laptops and hotspots if they needed them.

“Now if we hadn’t had an infrastructure in place, it might be really difficult to be able to pull off one of these unscheduled instructional days from the legislation, but we already have the infrastructure in place,” Smith said.

Hughes is concerned some students will not have access to a working internet connection during inclement weather. The General Assembly this session funded the expansion of rural broadband internet access, though it will take a while to implement the infrastructure.

Sen. Siobhan Dunnavant, R-Henrico, sponsored a related bill. SB 1303 will require both online and in-person learning to become available to students by July 1. The student’s parent or guardian would decide on the learning modality. The bill expires in August 2022.

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Kevin F. Hallock named University of Richmond’s 11th president

The Board of Trustees of the University of Richmond has unanimously elected Kevin F. Hallock, an economist and compensation and labor market scholar, as the institution’s 11th president.

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The Board of Trustees of the University of Richmond has unanimously elected Kevin F. Hallock, an economist and compensation and labor market scholar, as the institution’s 11th president. A press release announcing the appointment follows below:

“We are fortunate to have attracted to the presidency of the University of Richmond a person with the experience, character, and credentials of Kevin Hallock,” said Paul Queally, rector of the Board of Trustees and a 1986 graduate of UR. “Kevin is a dynamic and hard-working leader with a strong track record of building consensus and bringing people together around a shared vision and purpose. We are confident that as president he will help us to continue to strengthen our leadership position among liberal arts institutions nationally.”

A distinguished scholar, a gifted teacher, and an experienced and accomplished academic and institutional administrator, Hallock will join the University community this fall, at the start of the 2021–22 academic year. He will hold an appointment as professor of economics in the School of Business with affiliated faculty appointments in the Jepson School of Leadership Studies and the Philosophy, Politics, Economics, and Law program in the School of Arts & Sciences.

“I am deeply honored and humbled to serve in this role. I am inspired by the work of the students, staff, faculty, and alumni of the University, and I have been enormously impressed with the Board of Trustees and senior leadership,” said Hallock. “I am confident of a bright future for the University of Richmond.”

Hallock currently serves as the dean of the Cornell SC Johnson College of Business at Cornell University, which is comprised of three highly ranked schools enrolling more than 3,600 students. He has overseen increased applications and enrollment; initiated a new degree program in business analytics; strengthened the college’s financial position; enlarged an emphasis on fundraising, including laying the groundwork for a comprehensive campaign; and strengthened the college’s presence in New York City.

Previously, Hallock served as chair of the Department of Economics in the College of Arts and Sciences and in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR) at Cornell. He later served as dean of ILR, where he guided the school through a strategic planning process and made important investments in the student experience and student well-being. He also raised resources for investments in faculty and research and took steps to enhance staff well-being by investing in human resources.

Hallock is the author or editor of 11 books and more than 100 publications. His research spans topics including the gender pay gap, compensation design, compensation in nonprofits, executive compensation, layoffs, labor market discrimination, and disability in labor markets. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Hallock said he is impressed with Richmond’s combination of an outstanding liberal arts and sciences education with excellent professional schools. “From the creative work and research among the faculty, the intellectual energy and curiosity of the community, and the intense focus on the holistic development of students and care for their well-being ─ Richmond drew me in, and I couldn’t look away.”

Hallock is likewise encouraged by UR’s thoughtful work, progress, and commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging, which has also been a priority for him as dean at Cornell. “These are issues that I consider of foundational importance in all leading institutions like Richmond,” he said. “I believe that a central role of any academic leader is to help create and foster an atmosphere where everyone feels a sense of belonging and has the opportunity to thrive.”

Hallock graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He earned both his master’s and Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University.

He and his wife Tina have two grown children. She currently works for a nonprofit and is involved in initiatives to strengthen families, foster belonging, and promote resilience.

Both have become avid fans of Spider athletics during the recruitment and interview process. “The amazing Division 1 athletics program at the University adds to the distinctiveness of the Richmond experience — not only for our student-athletes but also for our campus community and our alumni,” Hallock said. “We are eager to cheer on our student-athletes in person and participate in many other activities on Richmond’s breathtakingly beautiful campus.”

Hallock’s appointment concludes an extensive national search. President Ronald A. Crutcher announced his intention to step down no later than July 1, 2022, to give the University as much time as possible to effectively identify and recruit the next president.

“The important work of the search committee was made even more challenging by the pandemic,” Queally said. “We appreciate the committee’s hard work and congratulate it on its success. We interviewed a pool of talented candidates, and our committee has helped us to recruit and hire an exceptional new president.”

Queally and Susan G. Quisenberry, the vice rector of the Board of Trustees and a 1965 graduate, co-chaired the presidential search committee that included trustees, alumni, faculty, staff, and student representatives.

“The Board of Trustees is deeply grateful for the outstanding leadership of President Crutcher and the many and lasting contributions he has made to the University of Richmond,” Quisenberry said. “President Crutcher led the University ably and inspirationally, helping to raise our national profile, and consistently encouraging us to face with clarity and courage a variety of important issues, including our institutional history, the importance of difficult dialogue, and the abiding value of free speech. His impact on the University will be long-lasting.”

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Survey: Workforce training graduates report higher wages, better work-life balance

Since launching FastForward in 2016, Virginia’s Community Colleges’ grant-funded career training program has prepared more than 24,500 Virginians to earn industry-recognized workforce credentials in a wide range of high-demand fields, including healthcare, information technology, logistics and transportation, education and skilled trades.

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Graduates of FastForward workforce training programs at Virginia’s Community Colleges see an average of $8,000 in wage increases, plus more satisfaction with work schedules and employer benefits, according to an annual survey of students who completed FastForward training and attained industry-recognized workforce credentials.

Since launching FastForward in 2016, Virginia’s Community Colleges’ grant-funded career training program has prepared more than 24,500 Virginians to earn industry-recognized workforce credentials in a wide range of high-demand fields, including healthcare, information technology, logistics and transportation, education, and skilled trades.

“FastForward has been serving Virginia’s workforce and employers for almost five years now,” said Dr. Corey McCray, associate vice chancellor for programs at Virginia’s Community Colleges. “With the pandemic driving the need for a skilled workforce, now more than ever, short-term, affordable training is critically important, and we’re thankful that FastForward can be that resource for Virginians in need of a leg up.”

The survey reports experiences from 289 respondents who earned workforce credentials between July 2019 and March 2020, and found that, in addition to wage increases, students reported quality-of-life enhancements:

  • 83% of graduates have work that offers paid-vacation time
  • 81% reported employer-paid medical insurance
  • 87% reported satisfaction with their work schedule

On average, FastForward students are older than a traditional college student, averaging 35 years old, and three out of four are new to community college. Additionally, more than 40% of FastForward students are minorities. The survey also found that more than 60% have dependents.

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