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Library of Virginia Literary Awards Winners Announced

Cottom, Tilghman, and Kingsley are the 2020 recipients honored by the Library of Virginia.

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The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce the winners of the 23rd Annual Library of Virginia Literary Awards, which were held virtually this year. Sponsored by Dominion Energy, the October 17 awards celebration was hosted by best-selling author and award-winning filmmaker Adriana Trigiani. Awards categories were nonfiction, fiction, and poetry; People’s Choice Awards for fiction and nonfiction; and Art in Literature: The Mary Lynn Kotz Award. Winners in each category receive a monetary prize and a handsome engraved crystal book.

Tressie McMIllan Cottom Photo provided by Library of Virginia

The winner of the 2020 Literary Award for Nonfiction is Tressie McMIllan Cottom for her book Thick: And Other Essays.

“The provocative and brilliant chapters hold a mirror to the soul of America in painfully honest and gloriously affirming explorations of contemporary culture,” wrote the award judges. “Streetwise and erudite, Cottom explodes the myth that the ‘personal essay’ is the only genre in mainstream publishing and journalism open for public commentary by female writers of color.”

Cottom, who has just been named a 2020 MacArthur Fellow, is a recipient of the Doris Entwisle Award of the American Sociological Association for her scholarship on inequality, work, higher education, and technology. In addition to Thick, she is the author of Lower Ed and her work has been featured by the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Atlantic, PBS, NPR, Fresh Air, and The Daily Show, among others. She recently left Richmond, where she had been an associate professor of sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University, for a position at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

The other finalists for the nonfiction prize were Erik Nielson and Andrea L. Dennis for Rap on Trial: Race, Lyrics, and Guilt in America and Mary M. Lane for Hitler’s Last Hostages: Looted Art and the Soul of the Third Reich.

Chris Tilghman Photo Credit: Susan Kalergis

Christopher Tilghman won the 2020 Emyl Jenkins Sexton Literary Award for Fiction for his book Thomas and Beal in the Midi. “This lushly written novel follows an interracial American couple in a family saga after they emigrate to escape bigotry in 1892,” wrote the award judges. “Its evocative descriptions of fin de siècle France and skillfully drawn characters add up to a sensitive and satisfying portrait of a marriage.”

Tilghman is the author of two short-story collections, In a Father’s Place and The Way People Run, and three previous novels, Mason’s Retreat, The Right-Hand Shore, and Roads of the Heart. He is a professor of English at the University of Virginia and lives with his wife, the novelist Caroline Preston, in Charlottesville, Virginia, and in Centreville, Maryland.

The other finalists for the fiction award were Angie Kim for Miracle Creek and Tara Laskowski for One Night Gone.

Naka-Hasebe Kingsley Photo provided by Library of Virginia

Benjamín Naka-Hasebe Kingsley is the winner of the Poetry Award this year for his book Colonize Me, which explores the experience of living as a Native American in today’s America. “The poems emerge from overlapping histories of violence and struggle not as fractured identity but as integrated multiplicity” wrote the award judges. “Kingsley uses form and language to indict the micro and macro aggressions of colonization with irony, heartbreak, and joy.”

An Affrilachian author and Kundiman alum, Kingsley is a recipient of the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center and Tickner Fellowships. His is also the author of Not Your Mama’s Melting Pot (2018) and Dēmos (coming in 2021). He is an assistant professor of English in Old Dominion University’s MFA program.

The other finalists for the poetry award were Lauren K. Alleyne for Honeyfish and David Huddle for My Surly Heart.

Philip J. Deloria Photo Credit: Jim Harrison

The Art in Literature: The Mary Lynn Kotz Award went to Philip J. Deloria for his book Becoming Mary Sully: Toward an American Indian Abstract. In Becoming Mary Sully, Deloria reclaims the artist’s work from obscurity, exploring her stunning portfolio through the lenses of modernism, industrial design, Dakota women’s aesthetics, mental health, ethnography and anthropology, primitivism, and the American Indian politics of the 1930s. Presented by the Library and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Art in Literature Award recognizes an outstanding book published in the previous year that is written primarily in response to a work (or works) of art while also showing the highest literary quality as a creative or scholarly work. This unique award, established in 2013, is named in honor of Mary Lynn Kotz, author of the award-winning biography Rauschenberg: Art and Life.

The winners of the People’s Choice Awards are The Substitution Order by Martin Clark in the fiction category and Mary Ball Washington: The Untold Story of George Washington’s Mother by Craig Shirley in the nonfiction category. Winners are chosen by online voting.

“The Substitution Order mixes legal expertise and wry humor in a story rich with atmosphere, memorable characters, and surprises right up to the end,” wrote the judges about the novel by Martin Clark, who is a circuit court judge in Patrick County, Virginia.

“Craig Shirley’s sprightly biography suggests that George Washington’s first fight for independence was from his controlling, singular mother—a resilient widow who singlehandedly raised six children on a large farm,” wrote the judges about Mary Ball Washington. Shirley is an author and public affairs consultant who splits his time between homes on the Rappahannock River in Lancaster County and a 300-year-old Georgian manor house in Tappahannock, Virginia.

The evening’s featured speaker was Douglas Brinkley, who was honored for his outstanding contributions to American history and literature as an award-winning, best-selling author and U.S. presidential historian. In addition to our presenting sponsor, Dominion Energy, the Literary Awards were made possible by Liz and Preston Bryant Jr., Christian & Barton LLP, MercerTrigiani, Anna Moser and Peter Schwartz, Kathy and Steve Rogers, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Carole and Marcus Weinstein, Weinstein Properties, and the Library of Virginia Foundation.

Next year’s Library of Virginia Literary Awards Celebration will be held on October 16, 2021.

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Richard Hayes is the co-founder of RVAHub. When he isn't rounding up neighborhood news, he's likely watching soccer or chasing down the latest and greatest board game.

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Photos: Preview of Dominion Energy GardenFest of Lights at Lewis Ginter

November 23rd is when you can check out the lights at Lewis Ginter but last night we were lucky enough to get a sneak peek.

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Full details on Dominion Energy GardenFest of Lights can be found here or on the Lewis Ginter website.

 

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InLight 2020: Safety and Accountability will be Spread About the City

The exhibition of contemporary light-based artworks, will take place November 12 – 15, 2020 at sites across Richmond.

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Usually, the 1708 Gallery’s 13th annual InLight is held in one location allowing the various exhibits to be within easy walking distance from each other. This year the theme of Safety and Accountability hints to a new setup for InLight. The exhibition of contemporary light-based artworks, will take place November 12 – 15, 2020 at sites across Richmond and will address the paired themes of Safety and Accountability. Learn more.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS

Afrikana Independent Film Festival; Amy Smith; The Anderson; Barry O’Keefe; Black Matter Productions; Caitlin & Misha; Calvin Brown; Carl Patow; Christine Wyatt & Amena Durant; Dustin Klein, Alex Criqui, Miguel Carter-Fisher, & Josh Zarambo; The Kinfolk Effect; LaRissa Rogers; Mariana Parisca & Sandy Williams IV; New Negress Film Society; Performing Statistics; Stephanie J. Woods; Victor Haskins & ImproviStory

 You can check out the interactive map here. Of the 18 exhibits only one is on the southside of Richmond and it’s only on Friday night.

More Photos from last year’s Inlight and from 2018

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Photos: Maymont Garden Glow

We escaped the election for a few hours last night and wandered around Maymont’s Garden Glow. Garden Glow turns off the lights this weekend so get your ticket now.

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Maymont Garden Glow runs through Sunday, November 7th. The fee is $12 and if you take your time takes about 45-60 minutes. It does feel relatively small but still very much worth the trip. The most popular spots were the creatures and plants made with light near the Italian Garden and the music maker (near the mansion), in which you step on panel and are rewarded with sounds and light changing.

More information from Maymont.

Brighten your autumn nights on a wondrous light-filled journey through Maymont, in a NEW LOCATION this year showcasing the historic architecture and gardens around Maymont Mansion. The scenery will shine with dramatic light displays for an enchanting experience to delight guests of all ages. Marvel at the breathtaking illuminations of the Italian Garden and other landscapes, admire colorful sparkles and shimmers in the splashing fountain, and stroll among historic estate buildings and the nationally treasured arboretum that stand aglow. The event also will include food trucks (see schedule), the Glow Bar and Glow Shop on the Carriage House Lawn. Proceeds benefit Maymont; no refunds. For information, call 804-358-7166, ext. 322.

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