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‘Black Space Matters’ exhibit transforms asphalt lot behind VCU ICA into garden

A local activist transformed a vacant lot outside the Institute for Contemporary Art in Richmond to highlight issues of food security and the importance of Black and brown community spaces.

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By India Espy-Jones

A local activist transformed a vacant lot outside the Institute for Contemporary Art in Richmond to highlight issues of food security and the importance of Black and brown community spaces.

The “Commonwealth” exhibit at Virginia Commonwealth University’s ICA features work from 10 artists including an outdoor installation created by activist and community farmer Duron Chavis who builds gardens throughout Richmond. The full exhibit seeks to examine how common resources influence the wealth and well-being of communities.

Chavis proposed the resiliency garden exhibit in 2019 during a public forum at the ICA. The resiliency garden—food grown to weather the tough times and to have food independence— is installed in an asphalt lot at Grace and Belvidere streets next to the ICA and features 30 raised beds of fruits, vegetables and flowers.

An extension of the garden exhibit is the “Black Space Matters” mural by Southside artist Silly Genius. A wall in the lot is painted, with fruit making the word Black and beneath the garden in big, yellow letters is “Space Matters.” The garden beds have historic quotes from civil rights leaders Kwame Ture and Malcolm X, among other activists.

“Black Space Matters means that Black people need space,” Chavis said. “We need space that is explicitly designed, planned, and implemented by Black and brown people.”

Chavis, along with a crew of volunteers, started building the garden on Aug. 10 while the ICA temporarily closed to install other exhibits.

“We invited him to think with us about how to activate a vacant lot next to the ICA,” said Stephanie Smith, ICA chief curator. “You could think about what it means to take a space and institutional resources, then give them over to an activist.”

Chavis seeks to address the lack of food access through his activism. Food insecurity, defined by the United States Department of Agriculture as “a household-level economic and social condition of limited or uncertain access to adequate food,” is an issue in Richmond’s low-income neighborhoods. The city had over 35,000 food insecure people in 2018, according to Feeding America, a network of more than 200 food banks.

“In a conversation about food justice, Black people are predominately impacted by lack of food access,” Chavis said. “We need space to address that issue.”

Low-income communities need access to resources and necessary skills to solve food wealth issues on their own, he said.

“We do not need anybody to come into our community to drop off food,” Chavis said.

He’s been doing work like this since 2012 and doesn’t have a hard count of how many garden beds have been built.

“Dozens, oh god, it’s all across the city,” he said.

Chavis amplified his efforts this year because of the pandemic. He fundraised and received a grant, according to a VPM report, to build over 200 resiliency gardens with the help of volunteers.

Quilian Riano, an architect at New York studio DSGN AGNC, designed the concept drawing for the ICA garden, which was envisioned as a public space for conversation and lecture. The completed garden is near identical to the original design except with an added texture and dimension, Riano said.

 The “Commonwealth” exhibit will be open until Jan. 17, 2021. After the exhibit ends, the gardens’ supplies and plants will be redistributed to other resiliency garden project locations throughout Richmond. Chavis collaborates with other groups and people to help people grow their own food during the pandemic.

Tickets to the indoor exhibitions can be reserved on the ICA website. Exhibits include a video performance by indigenous artist Tanya Lukin Linklater, Carolina Caycedo’s “Distressed Debt” and a sculpture by Lukin Linklater and Tiffany Shaw-Collinge.

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The Capital News Service is a flagship program of VCU’s Richard T. Robertson School of Media and Culture. In the program, journalism students cover news in Richmond and across Virginia and distribute their stories, photos, and other content to more than 100 newspapers, television and radio stations, and news websites.

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Photos: Preview of Dominion Energy GardenFest of Lights at Lewis Ginter

November 23rd is when you can check out the lights at Lewis Ginter but last night we were lucky enough to get a sneak peek.

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Full details on Dominion Energy GardenFest of Lights can be found here or on the Lewis Ginter website.

 

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InLight 2020: Safety and Accountability will be Spread About the City

The exhibition of contemporary light-based artworks, will take place November 12 – 15, 2020 at sites across Richmond.

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Usually, the 1708 Gallery’s 13th annual InLight is held in one location allowing the various exhibits to be within easy walking distance from each other. This year the theme of Safety and Accountability hints to a new setup for InLight. The exhibition of contemporary light-based artworks, will take place November 12 – 15, 2020 at sites across Richmond and will address the paired themes of Safety and Accountability. Learn more.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS

Afrikana Independent Film Festival; Amy Smith; The Anderson; Barry O’Keefe; Black Matter Productions; Caitlin & Misha; Calvin Brown; Carl Patow; Christine Wyatt & Amena Durant; Dustin Klein, Alex Criqui, Miguel Carter-Fisher, & Josh Zarambo; The Kinfolk Effect; LaRissa Rogers; Mariana Parisca & Sandy Williams IV; New Negress Film Society; Performing Statistics; Stephanie J. Woods; Victor Haskins & ImproviStory

 You can check out the interactive map here. Of the 18 exhibits only one is on the southside of Richmond and it’s only on Friday night.

More Photos from last year’s Inlight and from 2018

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Photos: Maymont Garden Glow

We escaped the election for a few hours last night and wandered around Maymont’s Garden Glow. Garden Glow turns off the lights this weekend so get your ticket now.

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Maymont Garden Glow runs through Sunday, November 7th. The fee is $12 and if you take your time takes about 45-60 minutes. It does feel relatively small but still very much worth the trip. The most popular spots were the creatures and plants made with light near the Italian Garden and the music maker (near the mansion), in which you step on panel and are rewarded with sounds and light changing.

More information from Maymont.

Brighten your autumn nights on a wondrous light-filled journey through Maymont, in a NEW LOCATION this year showcasing the historic architecture and gardens around Maymont Mansion. The scenery will shine with dramatic light displays for an enchanting experience to delight guests of all ages. Marvel at the breathtaking illuminations of the Italian Garden and other landscapes, admire colorful sparkles and shimmers in the splashing fountain, and stroll among historic estate buildings and the nationally treasured arboretum that stand aglow. The event also will include food trucks (see schedule), the Glow Bar and Glow Shop on the Carriage House Lawn. Proceeds benefit Maymont; no refunds. For information, call 804-358-7166, ext. 322.

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