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Richmond Region Tourism offering complimentary RVA masks at visitor centers

RRT is currently operating two Visitor Centers at the VMFA Robinson House and the Richmond International Airport. Both locations are open daily 10 a.m.- 5 p.m.  

RVAHub Staff

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Interested in adding to your personal mask collection? Richmond Region Tourism is giving away free “RVA” masks at its local visitor centers around the region.

RRT is currently operating two Visitor Centers at the VMFA Robinson House and the Richmond International Airport. Both locations are open daily 10 a.m.- 5 p.m.

“Face masks are one of the most effective tools we have to protect one another from COVID-19,” said Jack Berry, Richmond Region Tourism CEO & President. “By wearing masks, we also support the economy by helping small businesses stay open. We’re encouraging people to stop by our Visitor Centers for a free mask and to learn new ideas as locals discover and rediscover all the rich experiences our region has to offer.”

As the region’s primary marketer, Richmond Region Tourism has focused on supporting businesses and cultural institutions throughout the pandemic. RRT’s team recently launched TravelSafeRVA.com to keep visitors and partners informed about safety precautions. The organization is also actively working to rebook meetings, conventions, and sporting events and helping clients implement safety protocols.

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GRTC offering new shuttle to City Office of the General Registrar leading up to election

Beginning Wednesday, September 23, GRTC is offering riders a safe and accessible shuttle service to reach the new City of Richmond’s Office of the General Registrar, which was recently relocated to a larger facility with more room to observe social distancing for in-person absentee voting.

RVAHub Staff

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Beginning Wednesday, September 23, GRTC is offering riders a safe and accessible shuttle service to reach the new City of Richmond’s Office of the General Registrar, which was recently relocated to a larger facility with more room to observe social distancing for in-person absentee voting. Pre-election day services are available through October 31 at the new building at 2134 West Laburnum Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 23227.

Smaller, nimbler shuttle vans pick up passengers Monday – Saturday from two popular connection points in the GRTC bus network: 9th and Marshall on the North side of City Hall, and Broad and Robinson on the North side of the street by the Science Museum of Virginia. GRTC remains zero-fare, and shuttles are free to ride, as well, with funding support provided by the City of Richmond.

The service operates hourly. Weekday trips start at City Hall at 7:45 AM and run once an hour, with the last trip leaving the registrar’s location at 5:15 PM. Additional early voting service operates once an hour on both Saturday October 24 and 31 from 8:45 AM until the last trip at 5:15 PM.

CARE customers can continue to use CARE van service for free and may schedule trips to the new registrar’s office.

The Office of the General Registrar is open as a pre-election day voting location starting September 18 through October 31 from 8 AM to 5 PM, Monday to Friday, except holidays, and 9 AM to 5 PM the two Saturdays before every election. Additional pre-election day voting locations open October 24 through October 31 at City Hall (900 East Broad Street) and Hickory Hill Community Center (3000 East Belt Boulevard) on weekdays 8 AM to 5 PM and on Saturdays from 9 AM to 5 PM.

The last date to vote early in-person is October 31. For a complete list of Election Day (November 3) polling locations, most of which have a bus stop nearby, click here.

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Downtown

Virginia female lawyers, lawmakers remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death is being mourned by the country, and in Virginia, lawyers and legislators are reflecting on her legacy. Some called her a role model, others called her a trailblazer, but they all admired the impact she left. 

Capital News Service

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By Noah Fleischman

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death is being mourned by the country, and in Virginia, female lawyers and legislators are reflecting on her legacy. Some called her a role model, others called her a trailblazer, but they all admired the impact she left.

Ginsburg died Friday at age 87 from complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer.

Alison McKee, president of the Virginia Bar Association, said Ginsburg was one of the most empowering women in the law profession. The VBA is a membership organization of state attorneys who promote legislative changes.

“She was an extraordinary force in attempts to overcome gender inequality,” McKee said. “Overall, to borrow a phrase from Sheryl Sandberg, she leaned in for all women in our profession and helped to close the gap on gender inequality.”

Ginsburg’s fight for gender equality changed a Virginia college’s admissions process in the 1990s. She wrote the majority opinion in the 1996 case that allowed women to attend the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington. VMI was the last male-only college in the United States until the Supreme Court’s ruling.

Ginsburg wrote in the majority opinion that since a 1971 ruling, the Court “has repeatedly recognized” laws incompatible with the equal protection principle and that denied women access “simply because they are women, full citizenship stature-equal opportunity to aspire, achieve, participate in and contribute to society based on their individual talents and capacities.”

Ginsburg was also a longtime advocate for the Equal Rights Amendment, or ERA, a proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution that seeks to guarantee equal rights for all regardless of sex. The ERA first passed Congress in 1972 but could not collect the three-fourths state support needed to ratify it. In January, Virginia became the final state needed to ratify the amendment, though the 1982 deadline has passed. A congressional bill to eliminate the ratification deadline passed the House in February and is sitting in a Senate committee. Over the years Ginsburg has still vocalized support for the ERA, though in February she said she would like “it to start over.”

Sen. Jennifer McClellan, D-Richmond, was a co-patron of the ERA in Virginia.

“I think we’re carrying on her work, carrying on her legacy to make life, liberty, and justice for all include all and include women equally,” McClellan said. “We carried on her work with that, very much an inspiration there too.”

Del. Hala Ayala, D-Woodbridge, who was a co-patron on the ERA in the House of Delegates, called Ginsburg “our firewall to protect civil rights, voting rights and everything that we fight for” in a statement Friday night. 

“My life’s work for women’s equal justice, including championing the Equal Rights Amendment in the Virginia House of Delegates, was inspired by Justice Ginsburg’s work,” Ayala wrote. “Her determined spirit gave me the motivation to fight every day for what is right, knowing that we would make our Commonwealth and our country a better place.”

Ginsburg was a pioneer for women in the law profession, becoming the second woman appointed to the Supreme Court in 1993 after Sandra Day O’Connor.

Margaret Hardy, president of the Virginia Women Attorneys Association, said seeing someone that looked like her in the law profession is “critically important,” and that’s why diversity is important—so everyone has a role model.

“I think that just seeing a woman because in her case, in many instances, she was the woman, not just one of many,” Hardy said. “I think just for anyone seeing someone in a profession that you’re entering who looks just like you is an inspiration.”

Lucia Anna “Pia” Trigiani, former president of the Virginia Bar Association, called Ginsburg a role model for all lawyers, not just women.

“For her to do what she did, she also showed not only women that it could be done, but men,” Trigiani said. “She showed everyone that it could be done.”

McClellan equated Ginsburg to civil rights lawyer and former Justice Thurgood Marshall.

“I think she for women’s rights was what Thurgood Marshall was for civil rights,” McClellan said. “I as a woman lawyer, as a woman lawmaker, stand on her shoulders.”

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Downtown

Virginia bill seeks to guarantee free school meals to students advances to Senate

The Virginia House of Delegates passed a bill this month to provide free school meals for 109,000 more public school students in the commonwealth.

Capital News Service

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By Aliviah Jones

The Virginia House of Delegates passed a bill this month to provide free school meals for 109,000 more public school students in the commonwealth.

House Bill 5113, introduced by Del. Danica Roem, D-Prince William, passed the chamber unanimously. Roem’s bill requires eligible public elementary and secondary schools to apply for the Community Eligibility Provision through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service.

“School food should be seen as an essential service that is free for everyone regardless of their income,” Roem said.

The program allows all students in an eligible school to receive free breakfast and lunch. Currently, 425 schools are eligible for CEP but don’t take part in the program, according to a document that details the financial impact of the legislation. More than 420 schools and 200,000 students participated in CEP during the 2018 to 2019 school year, according to the Virginia Department of Education.

The bill allows eligible schools to opt-out of the program if participating is not financially possible.
Most Virginia food banks have purchased twice as much food each month since the pandemic started when compared to last year, according to Eddie Oliver, executive director of the Federation of Virginia Food Banks.

“We’re just seeing a lot of need out there and we know that school meal programs are really the front line of ensuring that kids in Virginia have the food they need to learn and thrive,” Oliver said.

Virginia school districts qualify for CEP if they have 40% or more enrolled students in a specified meal program, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). It also includes homeless, runaway, migrant, and foster children, Roem said.

Sandy Curwood, Director of the Virginia Department of Education Office of School Nutrition Programs, said school districts receive federal reimbursement based on a formula.

“Making sure that children have access to good healthy food, and particularly through school meals I think is a great opportunity,” Curwood said.

The federal government will reimburse schools that have more than 62.5% students who qualify for free meals, Roem said. Schools with between 55% and 62.4% of students enrolled will receive between 80% and 99% reimbursement.

“If HB 5113 is the law, how their children will eat during the school day will be one less worry for students and their families,”, said Semora Ward, a community organizer for the Hampton Roads-based Virginia Black Leadership Organizing Collaborative. The meals are available whether children are physically in schools or attending virtual classes.

The Virginia Black Leadership Organizing Collaborative has raised $8,000 in the past three years for unpaid school meals in Hampton and Newport News, according to Ward.

“While we are pleased with these efforts and the outpouring of community support, we should have never had to do this in the first place,” she said.

Roem was one of several legislators that took on the USDA earlier this year to not require students to be present when receiving free school meals during the pandemic. The Virginia General Assembly passed Roem’s bill earlier this year that allows school districts to distribute excess food to students eligible for the School Breakfast Program or National School Lunch Program administered by the USDA.

HB 5113 has been referred to the Senate Education and Health Committee.

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