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HCPS will provide students with free meals through school curbside service and neighborhood bus drop-offs

RVAHub Staff

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Even when school began this week using a predominantly virtual format, families depend on the thousands of meals prepared each day by Henrico County Public Schools’ School Nutrition Services Department. The department has answered the challenge of a highly unusual school year with plans to get free breakfasts and lunches to students using two distribution systems. Nutrition staff members will offer free curbside pick-up service at all HCPS schools, and team with HCPS Pupil Transportation Services to distribute free meals directly to 66 stops in Henrico County neighborhoods, using school buses. A list of meal distribution drop-off sites follows this message.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Monday that, in accordance with the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act, the universal meals distribution in effect since the spread of the pandemic in March would be continued through Dec. 31.

Among the features of the HCPS plan:

  • Free meals are available to any child 18 or younger at all HCPS school locations and identified bus stops.
  • Parents and guardians can pick up meals at any HCPS location regardless of where their student is enrolled.
  • Parents and guardians don’t need to provide student names or I.D. numbers to receive meals.
  • Families are strongly encouraged to apply for free and reduced-priced meals benefits, in order to participate after the current meals program expires Jan. 1, 2021.

School curbside service

Distribution of free meals will take place at all elementary, middle and high schools.

  • Monday through Thursday (Friday meals are distributed on Thursdays.)
  • 7-9 a.m.: Hot breakfasts (when available) and cold lunches.
  • 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.: Hot lunches as well as cold breakfasts for the next day.

Neighborhood distribution using school buses

HCPS buses will distribute free school meals to neighborhoods two days a week. Modifications are possible, based on demand and other logistical factors. Participants should follow social distancing and mask guidelines at bus stops.

  • Mondays and Wednesdays. On Mondays, buses will distribute meals for Monday and Tuesday. On Wednesdays, breakfasts and lunches will be distributed for Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, as well as Monday breakfast.
  • Buses will make 30-minute stops at each location, between 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

The following pages contain a current list of bus stops slated for school meals distribution. See an online map of school and bus stop distribution sites by going to https://tinyurl.com/HCPSMealsSites.

Neighborhood meals distribution bus stops:

(*Because of construction, curbside service will not be available at Holladay Elementary School until Sept. 14.)

Bus Stop Location (Elementary School, Middle School, High School)

  • Almora Ave. and Beth Road (Holladay E.S.*, Brookland M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Wistar Village Drive and Sprenkle Lane (Johnson E.S., Brookland M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Brook Run Drive and Cliffbrook Lane (Lakeside E.S., Moody M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Virginia Center Parkway and Virginia Centerway Place (Longdale E.S., Brookland M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Eunice Court and Eunice Drive (Dumbarton E.S., Brookland M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Cardinal Road and Cardinal Court (Dumbarton E.S., Brookland M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Sargeant Court and Sanctuary Drive (Trevvett E.S., Brookland M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Fox Rest Drive and Fernwood St.  (Holladay E.S.*, Brookland M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Shirleydale Ave. and Thalia Crescent (Ward E.S., John Rolfe M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Adamson St. and Beaver Road (Donahoe E.S., Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Cornett St. and Cedarwood St. (Donahoe E.S., Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Oakano Drive and Old Bronze Road (Baker E.S., John Rolfe M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Henrico Arms Apartments at Darbytown Road (Ward E.S., John Rolfe M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Millers Lane and Kings Drive (Montrose E.S., John Rolfe M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Wood Thrush Circle and Meadowlark Court (Adams E.S., John Rolfe M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Whiteside Road and Bradley Pines Circle (Seven Pines E.S., Elko M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Betner Road and Betner Court (Seven Pines E.S., Elko M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Hanover Road and Camero Court (Donahoe E.S., Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Airport Drive and Airport Place (inside Oakmeade Apartments at second entrance) (Fair Oaks E.S., Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Bull Run Court and Bull Run Drive (Mehfoud/Varina, Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Dry Leaf Lane and Early Forest Circle (Donahoe E.S., Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Millstone Landing Drive and Morning Creek Road (Shady Grove E.S., Short Pump M.S., Deep Run H.S.)
  • Fairlake Lane and Fairlake Court (Longan E.S., Holman M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Magnolia Ridge Drive and Sherwin Place (Greenwood E.S., Hungary Creek M.S., Glen Allen H.S.)
  • Maben Hill Run and Holman Ridge Road (Rivers Edge E.S., Holman M.S., Deep Run H.S.)
  • Three Chopt Road and Grove Gate Drive (Colonial Trail E.S., Quioccasin M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Three Chopt Road and Rockport Drive (Colonial Trail E.S., Quioccasin M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Woodman Road and Blackburn Road (Greenwood E.S., Hungary Creek M.S., Glen Allen H.S.)
  • Blue Ocean Lane and Calm Harbor Drive (Colonial Trail E.S., Short Pump M.S., Deep Run H.S.)
  • Grey Oaks Park Road and Grey Oaks Park Drive (Kaechele E.S., Short Pump M.S., Deep Run H.S.)
  • New Haven Drive and Old Nuckols Road (Twin Hickory E.S., Short Pump M.S., Deep Run H.S.)
  • Castle Point Road and Castle Point Lane (Echo Lake E.S., Hungary Creek M.S., Glen Allen H.S.)
  • Linsey Lakes Drive and Stone Lake Drive (Springfield Park E.S., Holman M.S., Glen Allen H.S.)
  • Mill Place Trail and Mill Place Drive (Glen Allen E.S., Hungary Creek M.S., Glen Allen H.S.)
  • Cloisters West (behind swimming pool) (Ridge E.S., Quioccasin M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Three Chopt Road and Bridgeworth Drive (Short Pump E.S., Pocahontas M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Imperial Drive and Sir Walter Drive (Ridge E.S., Quioccasin M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Jamestown Apartments (at second entrance) (Maybeury E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Pleasant Run Drive and Milhaven Drive (Carver E.S., Pocahontas M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Pump Road and Castile Road (at entrance to Canterbury Square) (Maybeury E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Castille Road and Palace Way (Maybeury E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Gaskins Road and Marywood Lane (stop on Marywood Lane) (Pinchbeck E.S., Quioccasin M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Hungary Spring Road and Prestwick Road (Skipwith E.S., Quioccasin M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Engel Road/Pollard Drive and West Club Lane (Crestview E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Tanelorn Drive and Spendthrift Drive (Jackson Davis E.S., Quioccasin M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Mountainbrook Drive and Huntsmoor Drive (Gayton E.S., Pocahontas M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Wilde Lake Drive and Shore View Drive (Nuckols Farm E.S., Pocahontas M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Heritage Hill Drive and Constitution Drive (Pemberton E.S., Quioccasin M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Vollmer Road and Moorefield Road (Three Chopt E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Sweetbriar Road and Woodberry Road (Tuckahoe E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Old Route 301 and Grammarcy Circle (Chamberlayne E.S., Brookland M.S., Henrico H.S.)
  • Brookhill Road and Crenshaw Ave. (Laburnum E.S., Wilder M.S., Henrico H.S.)
  • Kenway Ave. (at swimming pool) (Arthur Ashe E.S., Fairfield M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Newbridge Circle and mailboxes (Coventry Gardens Apts.)  (Highland Springs E.S., Fairfield M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Newbridge Circle and Hawkes Lane (at Building 305) (Highland Springs E.S., Fairfield M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Watts Lane and Kings Point Drive (Harvie E.S., Fairfield M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Delmont St. and Engleside Drive (Laburnum E.S., Wilder M.S., Henrico H.S.)
  • Delmont St. and Winston St. (Glen Lea E.S., Wilder M.S., Henrico H.S.)
  • Bluestone Drive and Cool Lane (Ratcliffe E.S., Fairfield M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Strangeford Place and Glen Eagles Drive (Pinchbeck E.S., Quioccasin M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Jack Burd Lane and Shrader Road (Dumbarton E.S., Brookland M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Elswick Lane and Shrader Road (Dumbarton E.S., Brookland M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Townhouse Road and mailboxes (Johnson E.S., Brookland M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Arbor Creek Drive and Arbor Creek Way (Colonial Trail E.S., Quioccasin M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Orchard Park Drive and Orchard Park Court (Twin Hickory E.S., Short Pump M.S., Deep Run H.S.)

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Virginia bill seeks to guarantee free school meals to students advances to Senate

The Virginia House of Delegates passed a bill this month to provide free school meals for 109,000 more public school students in the commonwealth.

Capital News Service

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By Aliviah Jones

The Virginia House of Delegates passed a bill this month to provide free school meals for 109,000 more public school students in the commonwealth.

House Bill 5113, introduced by Del. Danica Roem, D-Prince William, passed the chamber unanimously. Roem’s bill requires eligible public elementary and secondary schools to apply for the Community Eligibility Provision through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service.

“School food should be seen as an essential service that is free for everyone regardless of their income,” Roem said.

The program allows all students in an eligible school to receive free breakfast and lunch. Currently, 425 schools are eligible for CEP but don’t take part in the program, according to a document that details the financial impact of the legislation. More than 420 schools and 200,000 students participated in CEP during the 2018 to 2019 school year, according to the Virginia Department of Education.

The bill allows eligible schools to opt-out of the program if participating is not financially possible.
Most Virginia food banks have purchased twice as much food each month since the pandemic started when compared to last year, according to Eddie Oliver, executive director of the Federation of Virginia Food Banks.

“We’re just seeing a lot of need out there and we know that school meal programs are really the front line of ensuring that kids in Virginia have the food they need to learn and thrive,” Oliver said.

Virginia school districts qualify for CEP if they have 40% or more enrolled students in a specified meal program, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). It also includes homeless, runaway, migrant, and foster children, Roem said.

Sandy Curwood, Director of the Virginia Department of Education Office of School Nutrition Programs, said school districts receive federal reimbursement based on a formula.

“Making sure that children have access to good healthy food, and particularly through school meals I think is a great opportunity,” Curwood said.

The federal government will reimburse schools that have more than 62.5% students who qualify for free meals, Roem said. Schools with between 55% and 62.4% of students enrolled will receive between 80% and 99% reimbursement.

“If HB 5113 is the law, how their children will eat during the school day will be one less worry for students and their families,”, said Semora Ward, a community organizer for the Hampton Roads-based Virginia Black Leadership Organizing Collaborative. The meals are available whether children are physically in schools or attending virtual classes.

The Virginia Black Leadership Organizing Collaborative has raised $8,000 in the past three years for unpaid school meals in Hampton and Newport News, according to Ward.

“While we are pleased with these efforts and the outpouring of community support, we should have never had to do this in the first place,” she said.

Roem was one of several legislators that took on the USDA earlier this year to not require students to be present when receiving free school meals during the pandemic. The Virginia General Assembly passed Roem’s bill earlier this year that allows school districts to distribute excess food to students eligible for the School Breakfast Program or National School Lunch Program administered by the USDA.

HB 5113 has been referred to the Senate Education and Health Committee.

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Education

U of R’s Sharp Viewpoint Series features pairs of thought leaders from across the political aisle

Conversations about bipartisanship, the 2020 election, and viewpoint diversity will distinguish this year’s Sharp Viewpoint Speakers Series. This year’s series focuses on engaging in dialogue to foster change.

RVAHub Staff

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Conversations about bipartisanship, the 2020 election, and viewpoint diversity will distinguish this year’s Sharp Viewpoint Speakers Series. This year’s series focuses on engaging in dialogue to foster change. University of Richmond President Ronald A. Crutcher will host a series of conversations about pressing issues of our time with pairs of thought leaders from across the political aisle.

“The Sharp Speaker series provides us a unique opportunity to foster dynamic and critical conversations,” Crutcher said. “Each program this year will include two speakers from opposite sides of the political spectrum.  I’m particularly looking forward to the energetic and thought-provoking conversation that will occur with both speakers together.”

Due to COVID-19, events will be held via live stream.

This year’s series includes:

Sept. 21, 7 p.m.

Bipartisanship: What’s Changed and What’s in Store

Denis McDonough, former White House Chief of Staff under President Barack Obama

Mike Sommers, former Chief of Staff to Speaker of the House John Boehner

The two will discuss American political bipartisanship in the Trump era, the state of the 2020 U.S. presidential race, and possibilities for compromise amidst extreme political polarization.

Nov. 11, 7 p.m.

The 2020 Elections: What Happened?

Mary Kate Cary, a former speechwriter for President George H.W. Bush

Mary Anne Marsh, Democratic political analyst, and consultant

They will discuss the 2020 election results and their implications for critical national issues, including the ongoing COVID-19 crisis and response, economic recovery, and a new era of American civil rights activism. 

March 26, 2021, 7 p.m.

Friendship and Dialogue Across Difference

Cornel West, philosopher, political activist, and professor at Harvard University

Robert P. George, American legal scholar, and professor at Princeton University

West and George are friends and former colleagues who will discuss the importance of fostering dialogue and cultivating friendships across ideological and political divides.

These live-streamed events are free and open to the public, and registration is required. To register for the Sept. 21 event, visit www.crowdcast.io/e/university-of-richmond/register.

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University of Richmond listed as #22 top national liberal art college, highest ranking ever

This ranking is UR’s highest from U.S. News to date. UR ranked #23 in the 2018 and 2020 guides. The overall ranking for UR was #32 in the 2016 guide five years ago.  

RVAHub Staff

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U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges 2021 guide ranks the University of Richmond #22 overall among national liberal arts colleges. This ranking is UR’s highest from U.S. News to date. UR ranked #23 in the 2018 and 2020 guides. The overall ranking for UR was #32 in the 2016 guide five years ago.

The University of Richmond also ranked #25 for “Best Value” among national liberal arts colleges. Richmond is among only 1% of institutions in the U.S. with both a “need-blind” admission policy and a guarantee to meet 100 percent of demonstrated need for traditional undergraduate applicants. Thirty-nine percent of undergrads are eligible for need-based aid, and all first-year applicants are considered for merit-based aid, including full-tuition scholarships and a variety of interest-based programs.

Richmond also was named to the “Most Innovative Schools” list and ranked #18 among national liberal arts colleges. This category highlights colleges that are making the most innovative improvements in terms of curriculum, faculty, students, campus life, technology, or facilities. The ranking is the result of a peer assessment survey completed by college presidents, provosts, and admissions deans.

The University of Richmond was highlighted in the “Study Abroad” category of the “Academic Programs to Look For” ranking, coming in at #24. This accolade highlights schools that involve substantial academic work abroad for credit and value considerable interaction with the local culture. UR’s student population represents more than 70 countries, and about 65% of students graduate with an international experience.

Richmond also ranked in the Top 100 for undergraduate business programs at #97.

Additional information can be found here.

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