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HCPS will provide students with free meals through school curbside service and neighborhood bus drop-offs

RVAHub Staff

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Even when school began this week using a predominantly virtual format, families depend on the thousands of meals prepared each day by Henrico County Public Schools’ School Nutrition Services Department. The department has answered the challenge of a highly unusual school year with plans to get free breakfasts and lunches to students using two distribution systems. Nutrition staff members will offer free curbside pick-up service at all HCPS schools, and team with HCPS Pupil Transportation Services to distribute free meals directly to 66 stops in Henrico County neighborhoods, using school buses. A list of meal distribution drop-off sites follows this message.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Monday that, in accordance with the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act, the universal meals distribution in effect since the spread of the pandemic in March would be continued through Dec. 31.

Among the features of the HCPS plan:

  • Free meals are available to any child 18 or younger at all HCPS school locations and identified bus stops.
  • Parents and guardians can pick up meals at any HCPS location regardless of where their student is enrolled.
  • Parents and guardians don’t need to provide student names or I.D. numbers to receive meals.
  • Families are strongly encouraged to apply for free and reduced-priced meals benefits, in order to participate after the current meals program expires Jan. 1, 2021.

School curbside service

Distribution of free meals will take place at all elementary, middle and high schools.

  • Monday through Thursday (Friday meals are distributed on Thursdays.)
  • 7-9 a.m.: Hot breakfasts (when available) and cold lunches.
  • 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.: Hot lunches as well as cold breakfasts for the next day.

Neighborhood distribution using school buses

HCPS buses will distribute free school meals to neighborhoods two days a week. Modifications are possible, based on demand and other logistical factors. Participants should follow social distancing and mask guidelines at bus stops.

  • Mondays and Wednesdays. On Mondays, buses will distribute meals for Monday and Tuesday. On Wednesdays, breakfasts and lunches will be distributed for Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, as well as Monday breakfast.
  • Buses will make 30-minute stops at each location, between 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

The following pages contain a current list of bus stops slated for school meals distribution. See an online map of school and bus stop distribution sites by going to https://tinyurl.com/HCPSMealsSites.

Neighborhood meals distribution bus stops:

(*Because of construction, curbside service will not be available at Holladay Elementary School until Sept. 14.)

Bus Stop Location (Elementary School, Middle School, High School)

  • Almora Ave. and Beth Road (Holladay E.S.*, Brookland M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Wistar Village Drive and Sprenkle Lane (Johnson E.S., Brookland M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Brook Run Drive and Cliffbrook Lane (Lakeside E.S., Moody M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Virginia Center Parkway and Virginia Centerway Place (Longdale E.S., Brookland M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Eunice Court and Eunice Drive (Dumbarton E.S., Brookland M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Cardinal Road and Cardinal Court (Dumbarton E.S., Brookland M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Sargeant Court and Sanctuary Drive (Trevvett E.S., Brookland M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Fox Rest Drive and Fernwood St.  (Holladay E.S.*, Brookland M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Shirleydale Ave. and Thalia Crescent (Ward E.S., John Rolfe M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Adamson St. and Beaver Road (Donahoe E.S., Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Cornett St. and Cedarwood St. (Donahoe E.S., Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Oakano Drive and Old Bronze Road (Baker E.S., John Rolfe M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Henrico Arms Apartments at Darbytown Road (Ward E.S., John Rolfe M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Millers Lane and Kings Drive (Montrose E.S., John Rolfe M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Wood Thrush Circle and Meadowlark Court (Adams E.S., John Rolfe M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Whiteside Road and Bradley Pines Circle (Seven Pines E.S., Elko M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Betner Road and Betner Court (Seven Pines E.S., Elko M.S., Varina H.S.)
  • Hanover Road and Camero Court (Donahoe E.S., Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Airport Drive and Airport Place (inside Oakmeade Apartments at second entrance) (Fair Oaks E.S., Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Bull Run Court and Bull Run Drive (Mehfoud/Varina, Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Dry Leaf Lane and Early Forest Circle (Donahoe E.S., Elko M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Millstone Landing Drive and Morning Creek Road (Shady Grove E.S., Short Pump M.S., Deep Run H.S.)
  • Fairlake Lane and Fairlake Court (Longan E.S., Holman M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Magnolia Ridge Drive and Sherwin Place (Greenwood E.S., Hungary Creek M.S., Glen Allen H.S.)
  • Maben Hill Run and Holman Ridge Road (Rivers Edge E.S., Holman M.S., Deep Run H.S.)
  • Three Chopt Road and Grove Gate Drive (Colonial Trail E.S., Quioccasin M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Three Chopt Road and Rockport Drive (Colonial Trail E.S., Quioccasin M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Woodman Road and Blackburn Road (Greenwood E.S., Hungary Creek M.S., Glen Allen H.S.)
  • Blue Ocean Lane and Calm Harbor Drive (Colonial Trail E.S., Short Pump M.S., Deep Run H.S.)
  • Grey Oaks Park Road and Grey Oaks Park Drive (Kaechele E.S., Short Pump M.S., Deep Run H.S.)
  • New Haven Drive and Old Nuckols Road (Twin Hickory E.S., Short Pump M.S., Deep Run H.S.)
  • Castle Point Road and Castle Point Lane (Echo Lake E.S., Hungary Creek M.S., Glen Allen H.S.)
  • Linsey Lakes Drive and Stone Lake Drive (Springfield Park E.S., Holman M.S., Glen Allen H.S.)
  • Mill Place Trail and Mill Place Drive (Glen Allen E.S., Hungary Creek M.S., Glen Allen H.S.)
  • Cloisters West (behind swimming pool) (Ridge E.S., Quioccasin M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Three Chopt Road and Bridgeworth Drive (Short Pump E.S., Pocahontas M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Imperial Drive and Sir Walter Drive (Ridge E.S., Quioccasin M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Jamestown Apartments (at second entrance) (Maybeury E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Pleasant Run Drive and Milhaven Drive (Carver E.S., Pocahontas M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Pump Road and Castile Road (at entrance to Canterbury Square) (Maybeury E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Castille Road and Palace Way (Maybeury E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Gaskins Road and Marywood Lane (stop on Marywood Lane) (Pinchbeck E.S., Quioccasin M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Hungary Spring Road and Prestwick Road (Skipwith E.S., Quioccasin M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Engel Road/Pollard Drive and West Club Lane (Crestview E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Tanelorn Drive and Spendthrift Drive (Jackson Davis E.S., Quioccasin M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Mountainbrook Drive and Huntsmoor Drive (Gayton E.S., Pocahontas M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Wilde Lake Drive and Shore View Drive (Nuckols Farm E.S., Pocahontas M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Heritage Hill Drive and Constitution Drive (Pemberton E.S., Quioccasin M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Vollmer Road and Moorefield Road (Three Chopt E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Sweetbriar Road and Woodberry Road (Tuckahoe E.S., Tuckahoe M.S., Douglas Freeman H.S.)
  • Old Route 301 and Grammarcy Circle (Chamberlayne E.S., Brookland M.S., Henrico H.S.)
  • Brookhill Road and Crenshaw Ave. (Laburnum E.S., Wilder M.S., Henrico H.S.)
  • Kenway Ave. (at swimming pool) (Arthur Ashe E.S., Fairfield M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Newbridge Circle and mailboxes (Coventry Gardens Apts.)  (Highland Springs E.S., Fairfield M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Newbridge Circle and Hawkes Lane (at Building 305) (Highland Springs E.S., Fairfield M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Watts Lane and Kings Point Drive (Harvie E.S., Fairfield M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Delmont St. and Engleside Drive (Laburnum E.S., Wilder M.S., Henrico H.S.)
  • Delmont St. and Winston St. (Glen Lea E.S., Wilder M.S., Henrico H.S.)
  • Bluestone Drive and Cool Lane (Ratcliffe E.S., Fairfield M.S., Highland Springs H.S.)
  • Strangeford Place and Glen Eagles Drive (Pinchbeck E.S., Quioccasin M.S., Mills Godwin H.S.)
  • Jack Burd Lane and Shrader Road (Dumbarton E.S., Brookland M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Elswick Lane and Shrader Road (Dumbarton E.S., Brookland M.S., Hermitage H.S.)
  • Townhouse Road and mailboxes (Johnson E.S., Brookland M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Arbor Creek Drive and Arbor Creek Way (Colonial Trail E.S., Quioccasin M.S., J.R. Tucker H.S.)
  • Orchard Park Drive and Orchard Park Court (Twin Hickory E.S., Short Pump M.S., Deep Run H.S.)

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Kevin F. Hallock named University of Richmond’s 11th president

The Board of Trustees of the University of Richmond has unanimously elected Kevin F. Hallock, an economist and compensation and labor market scholar, as the institution’s 11th president.

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The Board of Trustees of the University of Richmond has unanimously elected Kevin F. Hallock, an economist and compensation and labor market scholar, as the institution’s 11th president. A press release announcing the appointment follows below:

“We are fortunate to have attracted to the presidency of the University of Richmond a person with the experience, character, and credentials of Kevin Hallock,” said Paul Queally, rector of the Board of Trustees and a 1986 graduate of UR. “Kevin is a dynamic and hard-working leader with a strong track record of building consensus and bringing people together around a shared vision and purpose. We are confident that as president he will help us to continue to strengthen our leadership position among liberal arts institutions nationally.”

A distinguished scholar, a gifted teacher, and an experienced and accomplished academic and institutional administrator, Hallock will join the University community this fall, at the start of the 2021–22 academic year. He will hold an appointment as professor of economics in the School of Business with affiliated faculty appointments in the Jepson School of Leadership Studies and the Philosophy, Politics, Economics, and Law program in the School of Arts & Sciences.

“I am deeply honored and humbled to serve in this role. I am inspired by the work of the students, staff, faculty, and alumni of the University, and I have been enormously impressed with the Board of Trustees and senior leadership,” said Hallock. “I am confident of a bright future for the University of Richmond.”

Hallock currently serves as the dean of the Cornell SC Johnson College of Business at Cornell University, which is comprised of three highly ranked schools enrolling more than 3,600 students. He has overseen increased applications and enrollment; initiated a new degree program in business analytics; strengthened the college’s financial position; enlarged an emphasis on fundraising, including laying the groundwork for a comprehensive campaign; and strengthened the college’s presence in New York City.

Previously, Hallock served as chair of the Department of Economics in the College of Arts and Sciences and in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR) at Cornell. He later served as dean of ILR, where he guided the school through a strategic planning process and made important investments in the student experience and student well-being. He also raised resources for investments in faculty and research and took steps to enhance staff well-being by investing in human resources.

Hallock is the author or editor of 11 books and more than 100 publications. His research spans topics including the gender pay gap, compensation design, compensation in nonprofits, executive compensation, layoffs, labor market discrimination, and disability in labor markets. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Hallock said he is impressed with Richmond’s combination of an outstanding liberal arts and sciences education with excellent professional schools. “From the creative work and research among the faculty, the intellectual energy and curiosity of the community, and the intense focus on the holistic development of students and care for their well-being ─ Richmond drew me in, and I couldn’t look away.”

Hallock is likewise encouraged by UR’s thoughtful work, progress, and commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging, which has also been a priority for him as dean at Cornell. “These are issues that I consider of foundational importance in all leading institutions like Richmond,” he said. “I believe that a central role of any academic leader is to help create and foster an atmosphere where everyone feels a sense of belonging and has the opportunity to thrive.”

Hallock graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He earned both his master’s and Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University.

He and his wife Tina have two grown children. She currently works for a nonprofit and is involved in initiatives to strengthen families, foster belonging, and promote resilience.

Both have become avid fans of Spider athletics during the recruitment and interview process. “The amazing Division 1 athletics program at the University adds to the distinctiveness of the Richmond experience — not only for our student-athletes but also for our campus community and our alumni,” Hallock said. “We are eager to cheer on our student-athletes in person and participate in many other activities on Richmond’s breathtakingly beautiful campus.”

Hallock’s appointment concludes an extensive national search. President Ronald A. Crutcher announced his intention to step down no later than July 1, 2022, to give the University as much time as possible to effectively identify and recruit the next president.

“The important work of the search committee was made even more challenging by the pandemic,” Queally said. “We appreciate the committee’s hard work and congratulate it on its success. We interviewed a pool of talented candidates, and our committee has helped us to recruit and hire an exceptional new president.”

Queally and Susan G. Quisenberry, the vice rector of the Board of Trustees and a 1965 graduate, co-chaired the presidential search committee that included trustees, alumni, faculty, staff, and student representatives.

“The Board of Trustees is deeply grateful for the outstanding leadership of President Crutcher and the many and lasting contributions he has made to the University of Richmond,” Quisenberry said. “President Crutcher led the University ably and inspirationally, helping to raise our national profile, and consistently encouraging us to face with clarity and courage a variety of important issues, including our institutional history, the importance of difficult dialogue, and the abiding value of free speech. His impact on the University will be long-lasting.”

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Survey: Workforce training graduates report higher wages, better work-life balance

Since launching FastForward in 2016, Virginia’s Community Colleges’ grant-funded career training program has prepared more than 24,500 Virginians to earn industry-recognized workforce credentials in a wide range of high-demand fields, including healthcare, information technology, logistics and transportation, education and skilled trades.

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Graduates of FastForward workforce training programs at Virginia’s Community Colleges see an average of $8,000 in wage increases, plus more satisfaction with work schedules and employer benefits, according to an annual survey of students who completed FastForward training and attained industry-recognized workforce credentials.

Since launching FastForward in 2016, Virginia’s Community Colleges’ grant-funded career training program has prepared more than 24,500 Virginians to earn industry-recognized workforce credentials in a wide range of high-demand fields, including healthcare, information technology, logistics and transportation, education, and skilled trades.

“FastForward has been serving Virginia’s workforce and employers for almost five years now,” said Dr. Corey McCray, associate vice chancellor for programs at Virginia’s Community Colleges. “With the pandemic driving the need for a skilled workforce, now more than ever, short-term, affordable training is critically important, and we’re thankful that FastForward can be that resource for Virginians in need of a leg up.”

The survey reports experiences from 289 respondents who earned workforce credentials between July 2019 and March 2020, and found that, in addition to wage increases, students reported quality-of-life enhancements:

  • 83% of graduates have work that offers paid-vacation time
  • 81% reported employer-paid medical insurance
  • 87% reported satisfaction with their work schedule

On average, FastForward students are older than a traditional college student, averaging 35 years old, and three out of four are new to community college. Additionally, more than 40% of FastForward students are minorities. The survey also found that more than 60% have dependents.

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Great Depression brought to life through interactive photo collection now available through UR’s Digital Scholarship Lab

Photogrammar is an open-access, web-based tool that allows users to easily navigate and engage with 170,000 photographs taken between 1935-1943.

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The University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab and Distant Viewing Lab has released a new project that gives its users the ability to explore what life was like in America during the Great Depression and World War II.

Photogrammar is an open-access, web-based tool that allows users to easily navigate and engage with 170,000 photographs taken between 1935-1943.

Photos can be browsed by categories that were assigned in the 1940s, from expansive themes like “Work” to far more targeted slices of life, society, and the economy during the Depression era like “Dancing,” “Strikes,” and “Abandoned Mines.” Users can also zero in on photos of their own communities from 80 years ago through an interactive map.

“This project allows anyone to experience some of the most iconic images of the era by photographers like Dorothea Langea and Walker Evans as well as others rarely seen before,” said Lauren Tilton, assistant professor of digital humanities and project director.

“What began as an initiative to support and justify government programs put into place to foster the country’s recovery from the Great Depression, these photographers quickly expanded their vision and set out to document America,” she added.

The image collection was originally digitized in the 1990s by the Library of Congress, and in 2010, Tilton and University of Richmond statistics professor Taylor Arnold began the Photogrammar project with a team at Yale University. Tilton and Arnold joined UR in 2016, and the project has continued to evolve with their guidance, being supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and American Council for Learned Societies.

Photogrammar is the latest installation in UR’s Digital Scholarship Lab’s award-winning American Panaroma: An Atlas of United States History. From immigration and federal urban policy to slavery and electoral politics, American Panorama features data-rich, interactive mapping projects that are a go-to resource for journalists, policymakers, educators, and citizens alike.

“From the moment it launched a decade ago, Photogrammar has been a groundbreaking project,” said Rob Nelson, director of UR’s Digital Scholarship Lab. “The photographic archive behind it offers an incredible window into all aspects of life in Depression-era America. We are very excited to have this new version as part of American Panorama. ”

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