Connect with us

People

ChildSavers transitions to telehealth, offering 24/7 immediate response line for families

ChildSavers’ Immediate Response initiative is Richmond’s only program devoted to the needs of children exposed to trauma or experiencing a mental health crisis.

RVAHub Staff

Published

on

As domestic violence counselors across the state prepare for a possible uptick in cases as families stay home because of COVID-19, local nonprofit ChildSavers is pivoting to a 24/7 Immediate Response hotline that is available for mental health and trauma crises involving children. People can call 804-305-2420 to access the service for free.

ChildSavers’ Immediate Response initiative is Richmond’s only program devoted to the needs of children exposed to trauma or experiencing a mental health crisis. People who utilize the number can talk with a clinician for immediate over-the-phone support. The clinician can also refer the child to ongoing mental health services through ChildSavers or community partners, if needed.

“We know there is increased anxiety and stress among families now that schools are closed for the academic year,” said Kristin Lennox, ChildSavers’ Immediate Response Team supervisor. “We want everyone to know our 24/7 hotline is available to anyone in the community and hope families will take advantage of this free resource.”

Available telehealth mental health services

To help reduce the spread of COVID-19, ChildSavers has begun to complement its in-person mental health therapy services for children with teletherapy options. The agency rolled out telephone-based therapy last week and will offer video conferencing via Zoom beginning the first week of April.

ChildSavers launched its teletherapy services with support from the Cabell Foundation.

The organization is continuing to offer therapy sessions from its East End location while taking precautions to help ensure the health and safety of families, children, and staff.

ChildSavers’ clinicians provide treatment for children and adolescents regardless of an ability to pay. For more information and to learn more about the organization’s mental health services, visit https://childsavers.org/ or call (804) 644-9590.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Business

Health Innovation Consortium, Lighthouse Labs partner on health-focused startup accelerator

Richmond-based Lighthouse Labs, a nationally-recognized, top 25 seed-stage accelerator, will partner with the Health Innovation Consortium (HIC), a collaborative alliance working to make the Commonwealth of Virginia a hub for health innovation, to launch Virginia’s only health-focused accelerator program.

RVAHub Staff

Published

on

Richmond-based Lighthouse Labs, a nationally-recognized, top 25 seed-stage accelerator, will partner with the Health Innovation Consortium (HIC), a collaborative alliance working to make the Commonwealth of Virginia a hub for health innovation, to launch Virginia’s only health-focused accelerator program.

Founding partners Virginia Commonwealth University, VCU Health, and Activation Capital, launched HIC in 2019 to help bring health innovations to market. HIC and Lighthouse Labs will leverage the new accelerator this fall to cultivate a pipeline of health-related technologies through a three-month immersive learning experience, capital opportunities, and potential for funding.

Making the Commonwealth’s only health-focused accelerator program possible is Activation Capital, a nonprofit organization that focuses on early-stage ideas to foster the area’s growing entrepreneurial ecosystem. A grant by Activation Capital to Lighthouse Labs, along with the contributions of HIC, will support the health-focused programming by Lighthouse Labs in addition to VCU’s efforts to develop new innovations in healthcare.

The new initiative, including expertise, grants, and funding by Health Innovation Consortium, will be offered alongside an industry-agnostic vertical that will also operate as part of the 2020 fall cohort by Lighthouse Labs. Selected companies in both verticals will participate in the accelerator from August 24 to November 13, 2020, in Richmond. During the fall program, the health-focused startups and the industry-agnostic companies selected will work with top-tier mentors as they participate in targeted and adaptive programs.

“Health systems, particularly academic health systems like VCU, are looking for innovative solutions involving every aspect of health care—its delivery to consumers, its technology, and its business models,” said Peter Buckley, M.D., interim CEO, VCU Health System, and interim senior vice president, VCU Health Sciences. “The Health Innovation Consortium was designed to facilitate, support, and scale health innovation. By partnering with Lighthouse Labs, a nationally ranked start-up accelerator, we have the opportunity to attract and engage with the most promising new technologies in the country that can improve the health of our community.”

The companies selected to participate in the health-focused accelerator will use the three-month programming as a springboard to develop digital health and medical device technologies, amongst others. Founders participating in the fall cohort will also have an opportunity to tap into HIC resources, including access to an exclusive network of industry experts, early-stage venture funding, and support, after the cohort has ended.

In addition to equity-free funding, programming, and mentorship, all selected companies will have access to $1 million in advisory services and benefits from partners such as Global Accelerator Network (GAN), Kaleo Legal, Startup Virginia, and other service providers. In addition, companies accepted will participate in Demo Day(s) designed to demonstrate each selected startup to investors, alumni groups, potential customers, and peers.

“Innovation is needed now more than ever,” said Erin Powell, executive director of Lighthouse Labs. “The fall cohort by Health Innovation Consortium and Lighthouse Labs will provide traction for the most promising, high-potential startups to begin making an immediate impact in health-related industries.”

“Beyond the three-month immersive experience this fall, the post-program opportunities, and access to the Health Innovation Consortium network and connection to capital, makes this new offering the most transformative platform for those who have identified the biggest challenges in human health and healthcare and are ready to accelerate quickly to provide solutions,” said Powell.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Downtown

Daily Planet converts recently purchased building into COVID Assessment Center

“COVID-19 disproportionately impacts medically underserved populations,” said Dr. Patricia Cook, Chief Medical Officer of Daily Planet Health Services. “Our COVID response was created to meet these patients at their point of entry – in a shelter, a local emergency department, or our COVID Assessment Center – and then provide them a safe place to recover.”

RVAHub Staff

Published

on

Just one month after purchasing a new property at 511 W Grace St., Daily Planet Health Services (DPHS) retrofitted the space into a COVID-19 Assessment Center. When the deal was being finalized in February, DPHS officials were closely monitoring World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and VDH reports. As the pandemic rapidly evolved, it became clear that to best serve the Richmond community, the nonprofit would need to utilize the facility to test symptomatic patients.

With a focus on assessing medically underserved and at-risk populations, including those who are uninsured or experiencing homelessness, DPHS began COVID testing in mid-March. DPHS has worked closely with members of the Greater Richmond Continuum of Care (GRCoC) and VDH to coordinate a comprehensive COVID-19 response to provide safe shelter and food security to people experiencing homelessness during the pandemic. DPHS has now tested more than 300 patients.

“COVID-19 disproportionately impacts medically underserved populations,” said Dr. Patricia Cook, Chief Medical Officer of Daily Planet Health Services. “Our COVID response was created to meet these patients at their point of entry – in a shelter, a local emergency department, or our COVID Assessment Center – and then provide them a safe place to recover.”

DPHS works with members of the GRCoC to provide remote medical monitoring, temporary accommodations, and food while patients recover.

“The COVID19 Public Health Emergency has strengthened our ties with community partners and created new pathways to wrap care around medically underserved individuals. We have travelled to community shelters and created tent-based testing sites. We also have created temporary primary care clinics in shelters and established computer portal stations within them to accommodate televisits. After the pandemic, we will continue to build on these relationships to provide comprehensive health services to patients experiencing homelessness,” Dr. Cook continued.

Throughout the COVID pandemic, DPHS has provided behavioral health and addiction treatment services via televists to keep patients and staff safe from infection, and has continued to staff two locations for non-COVID related face-to-face primary care and dental emergencies. This allows patients to continue to access the comprehensive services they are accustomed to at DPHS despite the COVID19 pandemic.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Downtown

Mayor Stoney joins 40 other U.S. mayors to urge Congress to temporarily Increase SNAP benefits

Led by Mayor Levar Stoney of Richmond, VA and Mayor Betsy Price of Ft. Worth, TX, these local leaders are asking for a 15 percent increase to all household SNAP benefits and an increase to the minimum SNAP benefit, bringing it from $16 to $30, in the next coronavirus relief package.

RVAHub Staff

Published

on

This week, a bipartisan group of 40 mayors from cities and towns across the country signed a letter to Congress urging federal lawmakers to temporarily increase benefits for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

Led by Mayor Levar Stoney of Richmond, VA and Mayor Betsy Price of Ft. Worth, TX, these local leaders are asking for a 15 percent increase to all household SNAP benefits and an increase to the minimum SNAP benefit, bringing it from $16 to $30, in the next coronavirus relief package.

“No child in Richmond or any city around the country deserves to spend one day hungry,” says Richmond, VA Mayor Levar Stoney. “In the face of a global pandemic, this country will be defined by whether it chooses to stand behind hardworking families or decides to abandon them in a time of unprecedented need. We call on Congress to do the right thing – fight poverty, protect our children.”

Before the pandemic, 1 in 7 kids in the United States faced hunger; this year, that number may grow to 1 in 4. SNAP is critical to ensuring children and families have an option to safely access food during these uncertain times. Benefits are used to buy groceries, helping to make room in budgets for other basic needs, like diapers and medicine.

“Communities need access to every tool available to fight hunger during this crisis,” says Jordan Bailey, state policy counsel at Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry campaign. “SNAP is not only a safe and effective way to feed children, it’s also shown to stimulate the economy. Increasing benefits and strengthening the program will provide immediate relief for families in need and will help our nation as it recovers from this crisis.”

SNAP is also one of our nation’s fastest, most effective tools to stimulate local economies. Benefits spent at local grocery stores and markets leads to more jobs, wages and local economic activity in the community.

While other stimulus programs put dollars in pockets, the vast majority of families spend their benefits before the month ends, making SNAP one of our nation’s highest returns on investment.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Richmond Weather

Events Calendar