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Restaurant employee fundraisers you can donate to right now

It’s tough out there right now for those in the service industry. With dining rooms closed and restaurants trying to stay afloat by getting creative with takeout, delivery, and other endeavors, employees without much of a safety net are hurting. Below are all of the employee fundraisers we’ve seen floating around that you can donate to right now and make a difference.

RVAHub Staff

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It’s tough out there right now for those in the service industry. With dining rooms closed and restaurants trying to stay afloat by getting creative with takeout, delivery, and other endeavors, employees without much of a safety net are hurting. Below are all of the employee fundraisers we’ve seen floating around that you can donate to right now and make a difference.

Another way you can make a difference is to donate to The Holli Fund. I (Trevor) was one of a handful of folks asked to host a virtual happy hour last week (embedded at the bottom of the post). This is an application- and need-based fund that gives grants to folks in both the front and back of house at restaurants and breweries across the area. The fund has done transformational things like paid folks’ mortgages, car payments, and fulfilled other important needs. You can learn more here and donate by texting “DONATE” and your amount (i.e. DONATE $5) to 805-518-8333.

Also check out our ongoing list of restaurants offering delivery and takeout, the coronavirus support list, and all of our COVID-19 coverage here. While we’re at it, we could use your support right now, too. RVAHub is a labor of love for both Richard Hayes and I, and we’re doing our best to keep the public up to date on important news and updates. With our ad network suspended, we’re running the site at a loss currently. It would mean the world to us if you were able to spare a couple o’ bucks and chip in to our cause. We’d love you for it.




Restaurant/employee fundraisers

 

More from Chad Williams of “30 is the New 20“:

Information on donating to The Holli Fund

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Two acre winery, restaurant set to open today in Scott’s Addition

Today, urban winery Brambly Park will make its debut in Scott’s Addition, the neighborhood known for its breweries and warehouses. The establishment flanks the railroad tracks in the historic neighborhood and will feature an event space, restaurant, a large park-like area, and a 3,000 sq ft covered and heated patio.

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Today, urban winery Brambly Park will make its debut in Scott’s Addition, the neighborhood known for its breweries and warehouses. The establishment flanks the railroad tracks in the historic neighborhood and will feature an event space, restaurant, a large park-like area, and a 3,000 sq ft covered and heated patio.

The venture is led by the same duo behind the Hofheimer Building and The HofGarden rooftop. Restaurateur Bobby Kruger and his business partner, real estate developer, Carter Snipes conceived the idea after seeing the property and realizing the potential to create a one of a kind park in a former industrial area.

“We saw the property with its pine trees and grass hill and immediately knew this could be something different for Scott’s Addition,” said Snipes.

Their team includes Winemaker Ben Nichols, who previously worked for Red Hook Winery in Brooklyn and Executive Chef Wyatt Swaney, who previously worked at Aloi in Scott’s Addition. Kruger, a seasoned Richmond restaurant veteran, really wanted to bring a winery concept with a broader more laid back appeal to Scott’s Addition.

“We knew from the start we wanted to be wine-focused,” explained Kruger, “but the key was to have an avant-garde winemaker in order for the concept to really shine. When we met Ben it quickly became apparent that we had found someone that excelled at sourcing high-quality unfinished products and turning it into exceptional wine.”

The Wine

The first batch of Brambly Park’s own vintage won’t come out until harvest season so Kruger traveled to Oregon, California, and several vineyards in Virginia to find winemakers who could help craft the first labels and blends.

Virginia favorite Michael Shaps of Wineworks Virginia quickly signed up to produce a dry Rose’ for the venture. Wooden Valley Vineyard, an 85-year old family estate in

California, produced the Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Cabernet Sauvignon. Walnut City Wineworks, in Oregon, joined on to produce Riesling and Pinot Noir.

“We’ll work with these partner vineyards and others to bring in grapes and juice for wine that will be produced at Brambly Park under our Scott’s Addition Reserve label,” said Kruger. “After harvest season, we’ll grow beyond the initial six labels with the Virginia grapes our winemaker has sourced for our small batch series. We are excited to showcase these growers and vintners and their amazing products.

The Food

The menu will feature foods that traditionally pair well with wine, with a focus on Italian cuisine. Housemade pasta, charcuterie, cheese, and a variety of baked items are emphasized on both the restaurant menu and the park menu, with the restaurant menu having a larger selection of entrees and the park menu having a larger selection of small plates.

“We have this great interior space and also a large property that lends itself to outdoor dining so we wanted to lean into the versatility of this location and the different ways people would want to enjoy their time at Brambly Park.”

The Park

The property is located in the far northwest corner of Scott’s Addition on almost two acres nestled against the railroad at 1708 Belleville Street. It features a small grass hill and a charming wooded picnic area and is surrounded by wild-growing bramble bushes from which the name was inspired. A large steel pavilion was added to the existing building and designed to resemble a railroad station platform. The inside is decorated with rustic furniture, reclaimed wood, and vintage railroad signage. There over 100 tables spread out across the spacious property, as well as a large parking lot.

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Department of Public Utilities encourages reopening businesses to flush water before use

As businesses prepare to reopen on Friday, the utility encourages the flushing of internal pipes before any water use resumes.

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The City of Richmond Department of Public Utilities (DPU) has been providing safe drinking water during the COVID-19 pandemic and it remains a priority. As businesses prepare to reopen on Friday, the utility encourages the flushing of internal pipes before any water use resumes.

With non-essential business being closed due to COVID-19 since March, water has been sitting in pipes. This water can lose the benefits of necessary disinfection, which could lead to bacteria growth and thus unsuitable for drinking, hand washing, or other uses. Additionally, turning on water after prolonged closures could disrupt plumbing materials and release contaminants into the water.

“To ensure fresh water is being used by newly reopening businesses, we strongly encourage them to flush the water in their systems. This is important to maintain the public health and safety of all residents and visitors,” says DPU Director Calvin D. Farr, Jr.

This process includes running water through all faucets, fountains, and other water treatment/enhancement systems with both hot and cold water for several minutes before using.

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Stoney: City to “cautiously move” into Phase 1 of reopening plan on Friday, May 29th

On Thursday, Mayor Stoney announced that the City of Richmond will cautiously move into Phase 1 of Forward Virginia, the state’s reopening plan. Masks will be required in all indoor spaces and restaurants will be asked to voluntarily connect patrons’ information for contact tracing purposes.

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On Thursday, Mayor Stoney announced that the City of Richmond will cautiously move into Phase 1 of Forward Virginia, the state’s reopening plan.

“When I look at the picture in totality, given the added tools at our disposal, the current trends in our local data and my faith in Richmonders to look out for one another, I believe that Richmond can cautiously move into Phase 1 on Friday, May 29,” said Mayor Stoney at Thursday’s press conference.

During the first delay that the City of Richmond requested, the Stoney administration and Richmond City Health District expanded testing efforts, implemented a contact tracing effort, ensured every COVID-19 positive Richmonder will be able to isolate safely and securely with supported isolation, and advocated for a statewide mask requirement.

The city initially requested a modified Phase 1 reopening that maintained restrictions on places of worship and personal care and grooming services, as mass gatherings and close personal contact for extended periods of time both significantly increase chance of community spread.

Because the governor denied the city’s modified plan for reopening, Richmond will move into Phase 1 of Forward Virginia, the state’s reopening plan, with strong recommendations reflecting the mayor’s proposed modifications. Local guidance and helpful links to state guidance are available here. The state has yet to provide guidance on what Phases 2 and 3 will include.

The mayor detailed a number of best practices for residents and business owners to ensure that the city moves into Phase 1 cautiously. The best practices emerged from conversations between the Stoney administration and members of the business community, faith leadership, and health professionals.

  1. All residents who are medically able to should wear a face-covering that covers the mouth and nose when in public spaces. The wearing of a face covering does not negate the need for 6-foot social distancing.
  2. Faith communities should continue to meet virtually if possible. If in-person meetings are absolutely necessary, the mayor strongly recommends faith groups meet outside while practicing strict social distancing and enforcing the face-covering requirement.
  3. Food and drink establishments that choose to offer outdoor service at half capacity are asked to request a name and contact information of patrons who dine in for contact tracing purposes. This practice is voluntary for both patrons and restaurants. However, collecting this small amount of information for each dine-in party will go far in assisting the Richmond City Health District in tracing and containing outbreaks. Guidance on this practice is available here.

The mayor made two requests of the state: to continue to assist the city in further expanding testing capacity and in providing adequate face-coverings and hand sanitizer throughout the capital city.

“Quite frankly, we’re going to need more support from the state for our residents and our businesses to reopen safely and sustainably,” the mayor noted in his appeal. “I make these recommendations and requests of the state because, as has been my mantra this entire pandemic. Reopening should be slow and steady.”

“When public health is on the line, blindly pushing forward is not an option. Decisions must be thoughtful, and they must be based in our collective knowledge of and love for our city.”

See more reopening guidance for local businesses here: www.rvastrong.org/reopeningguidance.

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