Connect with us

Government

Planning officials unveil conceptual renderings of a future, higher-density Scott’s Addition

Richmond planning officials unveiled a preliminary vision for the Greater Scott’s Addition neighborhood Tuesday evening at Diversity Richmond. The meeting was the third of four held by the Richmond 300 commission studying ways to encourage smart growth, best and highest use cases for future development and redevelopment, and create recommendations for zoning and planning policies that foster cohesiveness neighborhood-wide.

Avatar

Published

on

Richmond planning officials unveiled a preliminary vision for the Greater Scott’s Addition neighborhood Tuesday evening at Diversity Richmond. The meeting was the third of four held by the Richmond 300 commission studying ways to encourage smart growth, best and highest use cases for future development and redevelopment, and create recommendations for zoning and planning policies that foster cohesiveness neighborhood-wide.

While the committees are studying areas around the city, the Scott’s Addition neighborhood is unique in its areas of opportunity, including nearly 30 acres of largely vacant land around The Diamond. Using input from over 1,000 respondents to a survey asking residents and other stakeholders what characteristics future development in the neighborhood should have, planning officials unveiled high-level renderings and cordoned the neighborhood off into six distinct districts. For the purposes of this study, Scott’s Addition encompasses approximately 800 acres and stretches from I-195 on the western bound to Lombardy Street on the east; I-95 on the north to West Broad Street on the south.

The largest and most dense, the Gateway District, would see the encouragement of cohesive, high-density development along Arthur Ashe Boulevard near the Diamond site. Other areas including the “core” of the Scott’s Addition Historic District would remain mixed-use industrial to allow for a variety of uses from single story warehouses to six-to-twelve-story buildings as is currently the case.

The plan emphasizes tenets including open space, affordable housing, walkability, density, and access to transit. De-emphasized are lower density uses like single-story buildings and parking lots, which are no longer allowed as “by right” developments per code.

The renderings were presented on printed boards, charette-style, for attendees to reflect on and leave feedback via sticky notes. Planning officials including Director of Planning Mark Olinger were on hand to answer questions and give clarification. Mayor Levar Stoney opened the meeting with his thoughts on cohesive development, and Second District Councilmember Kim Gray was on hand as well.

After gathering additional feedback from stakeholders, planning staff will create draft recommendations that will guide future growth and development and present a final plan in May.

See the full presentation (PDF) here.

Comments

comments

Trevor Dickerson is the co-founder and editor of RVAhub.com, lover of all things Richmond, and a master of karate and friendship for everyone.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Downtown

Stoney administration launches rent relief program for qualified immigrant families

The program is made possible by a $250,000 grant from the Open Society Foundations, a non-profit organization based in New York dedicated to providing assistance to groups excluded from federal assistance, such as non-citizens, mixed-status families and those with limited English proficiency working in domestic service jobs and other essential industries.

RVAHub Staff

Published

on

Today, the city launched a program to provide rent and mortgage assistance to non-citizen and mixed immigration status households in Richmond. This program is designed to support those Richmonders excluded from federal assistance due to their immigration status.

The program is made possible by a $250,000 grant from the Open Society Foundations, a non-profit organization based in New York dedicated to providing assistance to groups excluded from federal assistance, such as non-citizens, mixed-status families and those with limited English proficiency working in domestic service jobs and other essential industries.

To assist as many households as possible, funds per household will be limited to $1500 or up to two months of rent, whichever is less. This support program is intended to aid households who are having trouble paying rent due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Applicants who have not received any other cash assistance throughout the pandemic will be given priority.

Applicants will work with the bilingual staff of the city’s Office of Multicultural Affairs and Help1RVA to determine their eligibility for the program, apply for assistance, and complete the verification process.

“We are grateful for this grant, which will allow us to help bridge the gap for those individuals and families who usually are excluded from receiving government assistance and who play a crucial role in keeping our economy going,” said Karla Almendarez-Ramos, Director of the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

The funds will be sent directly to the landlord or property manager. Applicants must provide proof of income and a valid lease or mortgage statement confirming the landlord-tenant relationship.

Housing Opportunities Made Equal (HOME) of Virginia, the administrator of the city’s Eviction Diversion Program, will be in charge of making payments to landlords and property managers.

“HOME of VA is proud to partner with the City of Richmond as the fiscal agent to ensure access for vulnerable, underserved, and at-risk populations in the most integrated settings within the community,” said Monica Jefferson, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of HOME. “Housing assistance can make a significant difference in the economic well-being of low-income families and those facing complex housing barriers.”

“If there’s one lesson we should take away from this pandemic, it is that everyone, regardless of immigration status, deserves a place to feel safe and secure,” said Mayor Stoney of the program. “This targeted effort will support families often overlooked in the design and implementation of public support programs, and I am so thankful that so many were willing to come around the table and find a fix to this challenge.”

Interested parties can learn more here.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Education

Richmond School Board votes to hold 100% virtual classes for first semester of 2020-2021 school year

Due to the ongoing uncertainty around COVID-19, students will receive 100% online instruction when schools reopen this fall in the City of Richmond.

RVAHub Staff

Published

on

From the Richmond Times-Dispatch:

After spending hours listening to parents, staff and teachers’ fears about returning to school as the number of COVID-19 cases in Virginia ticks up, the Richmond School Board decided Tuesday to have fully virtual learning in the fall.

The board voted 8-1 to forgo in-person instruction for the fall semester. The lone no vote was cast by Jonathan Young of the 4th District.

The board told Kamras on Tuesday that the administration would need to provide updates on virtual learning at every upcoming board meeting.

Continue reading here.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Government

Henrico launches rental assistance program for residents impacted by the COVID economy

Funding is available for qualifying, income-eligible households that have been impacted by job loss, furlough, reduction in hours of pay or other factors resulting from the economic downturn precipitated by the pandemic.

RVAHub Staff

Published

on

Henrico residents who are experiencing financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic and are at risk of losing their rental house or apartment can apply for emergency support through the Henrico COVID-19 Emergency Rental Assistance program.

Funding is available for qualifying, income-eligible households that have been impacted by job loss, furlough, reduction in hours of pay or other factors resulting from the economic downturn precipitated by the pandemic. The emergency program is designed to prevent homelessness; assistance is intended for Henrico renters facing the imminent loss of their residence.

Henrico County has received $360,000 from the federal CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act to fund the effort.

Since the pandemic surfaced in central Virginia in mid-March, more than 33,900 Henrico residents have filed initial unemployment claims through July 4, according to data from the Virginia Employment Commission. More than 15,200 residents have filed continuing unemployment claims.

Applications in English and Spanish are available from Henrico’s Department of Social Services. Residents can download and print the application or request that one is mailed to them. Beginning Monday, July 13, residents can pick up an application at Social Services’ offices at 8600 Dixon Powers Drive and 3820 Nine Mile Road.

Emergency rental payments of up to $1,500 per month will be made on behalf of Henrico residents who qualify for the program. The payments, which can cover overdue rent, delinquency fees, and court filing fees, will be made for up to four months. Applicants will need to provide documentation regarding the economic impact of the pandemic on their finances and household income as well as additional verification.

The Henrico COVID-19 Rental Assistance program will continue while funding is available.

Additional information is available from Social Services and by calling (804) 501-5294.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Richmond Weather