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More than 22,000 protesters take to Capitol Monday to advocate for gun rights, one arrest reported

Chants of “We will not comply,” and “USA, USA,” sounded through the blanket of security as thousands of armed Second Amendment supporters converged on Richmond to protest proposed gun control measures.

Capital News Service

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By Chip Lauterbach

Chants of “We will not comply,” and “USA, USA,” sounded through the blanket of security as thousands of armed Second Amendment supporters converged on Richmond to protest proposed gun control measures.

The rally, organized by the gun rights group Virginia Citizens Defense League, raised security concerns in the days leading up to it. Gov. Ralph Northam declared a state of emergency and banned firearms from the Capitol grounds from Jan. 17 to Jan. 21.

Over the weekend, Capitol Police erected a fence around the grounds and created one main security checkpoint into the area where speakers would be located. Capitol Police estimated around 22,000 people attended, with 6,000 entering the secured area where weapons were not allowed.

Despite the governor’s ban, many gun rights advocates came armed and opted to stay outside of the State Capitol grounds, flooding streets around the Capitol and legislative offices in the Pocahontas Building.

Capitol Police reported that one arrest was made. A Richmond woman was charged for wearing a mask in public — a felony in Virginia. The armed protesters didn’t attempt to breach the security fence put up around Capitol Square. A red smoke grenade was set off, but no other disturbances were reported. After the event, Northam expressed gratitude that the event wasn’t violent.

“Thousands of people came to Richmond to make their voices heard,” he said in a statement. “Today showed that when people disagree, they can do so peacefully.

Days before the rally, the FBI arrested seven members of a white nationalist group called The Base. At least three were reportedly planning to attend the rally and create a violent disturbance. Northam state that such intel prompted him to declare a state of emergency. Some businesses near the Capitol decided to close during the rally, though many remained open.

Philip Van Cleave, VCDL president, tried to dispel fears of violence by releasing social media statement urging attendees to stay peaceful and to focus on supporting the Second Amendment.

“The issue is not race; it’s not politics or politicians,” said Willis Madden, a member of National African American Gun Association from King and Queen County. “It’s not about who is in the White House or who just got elected, the issue is the Second Amendment.”

Many gun rights advocates expressed concern over SB 16, introduced by Sen. Dick Saslaw, D-Fairfax, which would have prohibited the sale and transport of assault firearms and certain types of firearm magazines.

Saslaw pulled the bill last week, but Del. Mark H. Levine, D-Alexandria, introduced a similar bill in the House, HB 961. Levine’s bill would prohibit the sale and transport of assault firearms, certain firearm magazines, silencers, and trigger activators, as well as outlines penalties.

Amy Parker of Westmoreland County said gun control legislation doesn’t make her feel safe.

“Everything they are trying to ban is going to get rid of most guns that people use for self defense,” said Parker. “It’s my right to not be a victim.”

Other gun bills in the General Assembly include SB 70, which requires a universal background check when people sell firearms; SB 69, which limits handgun purchases to one a month; SB 35, which allows localities to ban firearms in a public space during a permitted event; and SB 240, which would create a process for attorneys and law enforcement to file emergency orders prohibiting a person from purchasing, possessing or transferring a firearm if they pose “a substantial risk of injury to himself or others.” The first three were passed the Senate last week and SB 240 awaits a vote.

Van Cleave spoke against the measures endorsed primarily by Northam and Democratic lawmakers. Van Cleave was joined on stage by several Republican legislators, among them Del. Nick Freitas, R-Culpeper, Del. John McGuire, R-Henrico and Sen. Amanda Chase, R-Chesterfield.

“Every other freedom that we have as Americans is based on that Second Amendment,” said Chase, repeating a phrase that she used earlier while addressing advocates waiting in line to lobby lawmakers.

 Chase, who previously wore a pistol on the Senate floor during the 2019 General Assembly session, said in a Capital News Service interview that she was “so encouraged” by the rally turnout. Chase said she will continue to work with gun rights advocates to overturn the proposed legislation: “We’re gonna make it happen.”

Attendees expressed happiness that the massive event was not marred by any major disruptions or violence.

“I’ve been following the bills and listening to all of the news surrounding today, and I wanted to see for myself that those of us in Richmond could come out here and be peaceful,” said Ryan Querry, a psychology student at Virginia Commonwealth University. “Most people say they are surprised that it turned out so peaceful, but this is exactly what I expected.”

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The Capital News Service is a flagship program of VCU’s Richard T. Robertson School of Media and Culture. In the program, journalism students cover news in Richmond and across Virginia and distribute their stories, photos, and other content to more than 100 newspapers, television and radio stations, and news websites.

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Downtown

Children’s Hospital Foundation launches $100 million capital campaign for new “Wonder Tower”

Last week, the Children’s Hospital Foundation launched the public fundraising phase of its Built for Kids capital campaign, with a goal of raising $100 million from the community to support the construction of a new inpatient and emergency tower at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, affectionately known as the Wonder Tower.

RVAHub Staff

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Last week, the Children’s Hospital Foundation launched the public fundraising phase of its Built for Kids capital campaign, with a goal of raising $100 million from the community to support the construction of a new inpatient and emergency tower at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, affectionately known as the Wonder Tower.

As part of the public fundraising launch, Children’s Hospital Foundation launched a creative campaign throughout Central Virginia designed to raise awareness of the new hospital and inspire donations from the community, corporations and individuals.

Once complete, the Wonder Tower will be the culmination of years of planning to bring world-class pediatric facilities to Central Virginia. Located in downtown Richmond, the 16-story tower will be home to CHoR’s Level 1 pediatric trauma center, emergency room, inpatient units, new operating rooms, increased imaging capacity and family amenities —all in an environment created just for kids and families. The facility features free, convenient parking, all private patient rooms and kid-friendly design and architectural elements. Connected to CHoR’s outpatient Children’s Pavilion, the facility completes an entire city block dedicated to caring for kids.

“A hospital environment just for kids and families has been our community’s vision for many years, and it’s becoming a reality as we complete an entire city block dedicated to pediatric care – all under one roof,”  said Elias Neujahr, CEO of CHoR. “The Wonder Tower will be a place where every child in our growing community has a chance to heal, recover and celebrate their super powers. It will be a place where our nationally ranked care, innovative research and top-tier education programs come together to provide the best patient experience for kids and families.”

Reflecting the wonder of the new hospital, the creative campaign was concepted and designed by Markham & Stein, a Miami-based agency, along with Richmond-based Brand Federation, which handled research, brand and messaging work. At this stage, the “Built for Kids” campaign visually highlights the look of the new facility, while the messaging emphasizes the need to “defend childhood” and protect the most vulnerable among us – children.

“People understand and connect with the idea that childhood must be protected as it’s critical to a child’s development and vital for so many reasons,” said Lauren Moore, president and CEO of Children’s Hospital Foundation. “The Wonder Tower is a place where children will receive world-class medical care close to home, and while they’re there, we’ll do everything possible to keep the spirit of childhood all around them.”

Children’s Hospital Foundation is currently running a dollar-for-dollar matching campaign to encourage the community to maximize their impact by 100% by taking advantage of the Foundation match commitment. To date, the Foundation has raised more than one-third of its $100 million fundraising goal.

CHoR is currently celebrating its 100th anniversary year treating all children in need of care. In June 2019, CHoR broke ground on the new inpatient tower adjacent to the current outpatient Children’s Pavilion, which when completed will create a free-standing, full-service children’s hospital on East Marshall Street between 10th and 11th streets. Construction is expected to be complete in 2023.

To follow along with the progress of the Built for Kids capital campaign or give to the Wonder Tower, visit builtforkids.org.

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Business

The Richmond Night Market launches holiday villages across the city to celebrate the season

The Holiday Villages are a multicultural holiday market shopping experience that will feature local goods, art, food, music, and the best of Richmond culture.

RVAHub Staff

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The Richmond Night Market, in partnership with the City of Richmond, Office of Economic Development, Flying Squirrels, Brok Productions, and media partner, Richmond Magazine, announced it will open five Holiday Villages across the city this holiday season to celebrate the Richmond community and its resilience. The open-air markets will be open every Saturday from 12 to 7 p.m. beginning November 28 to December 19. Vendors are encouraged to apply.

“Richmond is an amazing city and we want to make sure folks don’t forget about that, especially during these challenging times,” said Melody Joy Short, co-founder of Richmond Night Market. “We are a village and it’s important that we continue to support each other, especially our artisan and small business community. Let’s spread some holiday cheer, celebrate each other, and do our part to uplift the local economy.”

The Holiday Villages are a multicultural holiday market shopping experience that will feature local goods, art, food, music, and the best of Richmond culture. The open-air markets are spread across several locations to encourage social distancing and reduce the spread of COVID-19, with strict COVID-19 measures in place supported by the City of Richmond. Plus, attendees will have an opportunity to explore different neighborhoods including Manchester, Scott’s Addition, the Arts District, Jackson Ward, and Shockoe Bottom.

“Every neighborhood has its own vibe and flavor,” said Adrienne Cole Johnson, co-founder of Richmond Night Market. “The food, shopping experience, retailers and services are all unique to each part of the city and we want to recreate that with our Holiday Villages. We want people to shop and buy local, as well as showcase all of the gems in the city.”

“Artists and small businesses across the board should sign up to become a vendor,” Cole Johnson added.

The Richmond Night Market launched in April 2019 as a monthly gathering at the 17th Street Farmers’ Market in Shockoe Bottom as a way for locals and tourists to shop for clothing, jewelry, visual art, organic products and even artisanal food. Event organizers shifted their approach during the pandemic, launching a successful virtual experience that allowed patrons to engage with independent, small businesses in a new way on social media.

“We see our Holiday Villages as an extension of what we’ve been doing all year,” said Short. “Most, if not all businesses, have experienced some disruption and we want to ensure there is true recovery. Our efforts have increased sales by 40 percent for many artists. With the holiday season around the corner, our aim is to keep creating these opportunities to generate revenue and uplift this community.”

Patrons will be able to start their shopping experience on Small Business Saturday (November 28) and explore all of the Holiday Villages through Saturday, December 19. Those interested in becoming a vendor can apply at www.richmondnightmarketva.com.

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Community

New Law Prohibits Open Carry, Law not Enforced Last Night when Boogaloo Boys Show Up Last Night

To amend and reordain City Code 19-334.1, which prohibits the carrying of firearms within certain places, to modify the nature and extent of the firearms and prohibited places subject to inclusion as permitted by Va. Code 15.2-915.

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Infowars’ Owen Shroyer made a quick stop in Richmond last night so that Trump supporters, militia and boogaloo activists, and BLM counter-protesters could wave their various flags. The police were on hand to keep the two sides separate and @FordFisher on Twitter has a thread of how the evening went down.

Interestingly a new ordinance prohibiting open carry at protests did not seem to be enforced. The law was passed in September and prohibits the carrying of guns at public events such as protests, whether the gatherings are permitted or not, and also will apply to nearby public areas such as sidewalks and roadways. Violators could face a class 1 misdemeanor, which is punishable by up to a year in jail or a fine of up to $2,500 dollars.

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