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RVA Legends — Allison & Addison

A look into the history of Richmond places and people that have disappeared from our landscape.

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[IOR] — Allison & Addison’s Fertilizing and Chemical Works, Richmond, Virginia — circa 1886

1322 East Cary Street (Office)
Manchester Docks (Factory)

You keep those fertilizer plants downriver… and downwind.

[RVCJ03] — Allison & Addison Factory, Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company — circa 1903

[RVCJ03] — Allison & Addison Factory, Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company — circa 1903

Allison & Addison, manufacturers of sulphuric acid and fertilizers, of this city, have their works on the south side of the river below Manchester, and opposite Richmond’s suburb of Rocketts. These works cover some four acres of ground. In the buildings alone there are some two acres of flooring. These buildings are fitted up completely with machinery, some of it imported ‘from Europe, and some of it specially manufactured for these works.

(Library of Congress) — Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Richmond (1905) — Plate 45 — showing campus & buildings of the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co. Allison & Addison Branch at Manchester Docks

(Library of Congress) — Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Richmond (1905) — Plate 45 — showing campus & buildings of the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co. Allison & Addison Branch at Manchester Docks

There is fifteen feet of water at low tide at the landing of these works, and vessels of 1,000 tons can load there. In these works from 50 to 75 hands are employed according to the state of trade. The output, with a capacity of a hundred tons a day (about 15,000 tons a year) is $100,000 to $300,000 annually, the exact figures depending upon the prices that may be prevailing for the time. [RVCJ03]

(Find A Grave) — John Addison

(Find A Grave) — John Addison

This firm is composed of Messrs. J. W. Allison, E. B. Addison, William H. Allison and John Addison, and it is the oldest house in the fertilizing line in this city. [IOR]

(Duke University Libraries) — 1884 advertisement for Allison & Addison’s High-Grade “Star Brand” Fertilizers for Wheat and Grass, Richmond, Virginia

(Duke University Libraries) — 1884 advertisement for Allison & Addison’s High-Grade “Star Brand” Fertilizers for Wheat and Grass, Richmond, Virginia

These gentlemen are conspicuous for the interests they have here in banks and financial institutions of the city, and in manufacturing concerns, besides this, and other important projects. Their city offices are at 1322 Cary street. They have membership as a firm in the Chamber of Commerce. [RVCJ03]

(Chronicling America) — Richmond Times, December 31, 1899 — Allison & Addison Factory. Situated on the Right Bank of the River, Opposite Rocketts. Yearly Capacity, 20,000 Tons of Manufactured Fertilizer. Number of Men Employed 135

(Chronicling America) — Richmond Times, December 31, 1899 — Allison & Addison Factory. Situated on the Right Bank of the River, Opposite Rocketts. Yearly Capacity, 20,000 Tons of Manufactured Fertilizer. Number of Men Employed 135

In 1865 they started business as dealers in fertilizers, and their trade assumed such dimensions in a few years that they commenced manufacturing. Thev have a large factory, located in Rocketts, thoroughly equipped, with all the modern machinery necessary to an extensive business, and giving employment to a large number of hands.

September 2019 — looking towards former factory location — note Rockett’s Landing at left

September 2019 — looking towards former factory location — note Rockett’s Landing at left

Their trade is principally located in the Virginias, Carolinas, Georgia and Tennessee; and a representative of the house can always be found somewhere on the road, on business intent.

Mr. J. W. Allison is a native of this city, a Director in the National Bank of Virginia, and a member of the James River Improvement. Committee; also, President of the Old Dominion Fruit Growing Company.

(Chronicling America) — advertisement in the Farmville Herald — February 16, 1900

(Chronicling America) — advertisement in the Farmville Herald — February 16, 1900

Mr. E. B. Addison, formerly of Alexandria, Va., has lived here since the war, is a Director in the City Bank, the Virginia Fire and Marine Insurance Company, and a member of the Board of Police Commissioners. Mr. William H. Allison was born in this city, and has always been in his present line of business.

(VCU) — 1889 Baist Atlas Map of Richmond — Plate 2 — showing ownership of 1322 by W. H. & J. W. Allison — note Virginia Street used to continue all the to Lombard Alley

(VCU) — 1889 Baist Atlas Map of Richmond — Plate 2 — showing ownership of 1322 by W. H. & J. W. Allison — note Virginia Street used to continue all the to Lombard Alley

Mr. John Addison, formerly of Alexandria, Va., has lived here since 1865, and has been connected with this house ever since. Is Director in Citizens Bank of Richmond, and Director in the Richmond Corn and Cotton Exchange. [IOR]

September 2019 — looking toward 1322 East Cary Street

September 2019 — looking toward 1322 East Cary Street

Allison & Addison may have been first and oldest, but that didn’t stop them from being acquired by the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company sometime between 1886 and 1900. The builders of the Chemical Building on South Twelfth Street also had operations in Richmond and would continue to until 1963, when they sold out to Socony Mobil Oil.

(Allison & Addison is part of the Atlas RVA! Project)


Print Sources

  • [IOR] Industries of Richmond. James P. Wood. 1886.
  • [RVCJ03] Richmond, Virginia: The City on the James: The Book of Its Chamber of Commerce and Principal Business Interests. G. W. Engelhardt. 1903.

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Combining protean forces from the forbidden Zero Serum with the unbridled power of atomic fusion, to better probe the Wisdom of the Ancients and their Forgotten Culture.

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VDH acknowledges first case of new COVID-19 variant identified in Virginia

SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7 has been identified in a sample from an adult resident of Northern Virginia with no reported recent travel history. The variant, which first emerged in the United Kingdom in late 2020, is associated with increased person-to-person transmission of COVID-19.

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The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) and the Department of General Services Division of Consolidated Laboratory Services (DCLS) today announced that the first case of the SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7 has been identified in a sample from an adult resident of Northern Virginia with no reported recent travel history. The B.1.1.7 variant, which first emerged in the United Kingdom in late 2020, is associated with increased person-to-person transmission of COVID-19.

DCLS confirmed the case using next-generation sequencing that provides a genetic blueprint of the virus that causes COVID-19. DCLS has informed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the case.

“Viruses change all the time, and we expect to see new strains as disease spreads,” said State Health Commissioner M. Norman Oliver, MD, MA. “We know this variant strain spreads more quickly between people than other strains currently circulating in our communities, but we still have more to learn about whether it causes more severe illness. As our state public health officials closely monitor the emergence of the B.1.1.7 variant in our Commonwealth, it is important that all Virginians continue following mitigation measures.”

In the United States, nearly 200 cases of the B.1.1.7 variant have been detected in 23 states as of January 22, 2021. While scientists are working to better understand its impact on vaccine efficacy, early data suggests currently authorized vaccines are effective against the new variant. VDH continues to work with communities across Virginia to slow the spread of all strains of COVID-19 through widespread adherence to preventive measures, supporting testing and vaccination efforts, and conducting investigations of cases and outbreaks.

As a virus spreads from one person to another, it makes copies of itself and sometimes makes small genetic changes called mutations. Because of these mutations, new variants of a virus are expected to occur over time. According to the CDC, multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been documented in the United States and around the world. The B.1.1.7 variant contains an unusually large number of mutations.

DCLS began sequencing positive COVID-19 samples in March 2020, becoming one of the first public health labs in the nation to use this technology to examine the genetic makeup of the virus and track how it is changing and being transmitted in the Commonwealth. To date, DCLS has sequenced more than 10 percent of positive samples tested by the state lab, and is working with other labs in Virginia to solicit additional positive samples to sequence so public health officials can get a representation of variants circulating throughout Virginia.

“Sequencing is one of many tools we have available at the state’s public health laboratory to enable medical and public health officials to quickly identify and respond to threats such as emerging COVID-19 variants,” said Dr. Denise Toney, Director of DCLS. “We share this information not only within the Commonwealth, but with our federal and international partners to gain a better understanding of emerging genetic changes to SARS-CoV-2.”

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Results from “Lost Cause” Studio Project Survey Reveal a Richmond Eager to Confront its Past

The survey asked Richmond region residents to share their knowledge about and ongoing impact of the Lost Cause myth, their desire to learn about this complex history and how a transformed Valentine Studio can address community needs.

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From the Valentine.

Today the Valentine released the results of a community survey, conducted in October and November of 2020.

The survey asked Richmond region residents to share their knowledge about and ongoing impact of the Lost Cause myth, their desire to learn about this complex history and how a transformed Valentine Studio (the location on the museum’s campus where sculptor Edward Valentine created many Lost Cause works) can address community needs. More than 1,000 participants, representing a wide variety of perspectives and backgrounds, completed the survey.

A diverse team of historians, activists, local leaders, Valentine family members and community members developed the survey. The Valentine also held focus groups to gain a deeper understanding of the variety of opinions about the Lost Cause, the role of cultural institutions in sharing this history and the potential installation of the damaged, paint-covered Jefferson Davis statue, until recently displayed on Monument Avenue, in the space. The results of the survey and the focus groups will inform and guide the project development.

Results included:

A majority of respondents stated that they would like to see the Valentine use the reinterpreted studio to explore the history of power and policies in Jim Crow Richmond, the art and artistic processes that created Lost Cause sculptures and the history of racial oppression in Richmond.

Additionally, 65% of respondents from the Richmond region agreed that museums should acquire the monuments from Monument Avenue and display them with context. For the Valentine specifically, this reinforced our request to the City of Richmond to acquire and display the graffiti-covered Jefferson Davis statue on his back as he fell.

Additionally, focus group participants, moderated by project partner Josh Epperson, felt that using the studio to explore Lost Cause history and connect it to the present would be a valuable use of the space. Focus group participants also affirmed the Valentine’s commitment to continuing its high level of community engagement, which they expected to be critical to the success of the reimagined studio.

You can find additional survey results HERE.

“Based on the survey feedback we received from our fellow Richmonders, we are confident that this is the best next step for this space and for this institution,” said Director Bill Martin. “We look forward to providing a location where Richmonders can learn about the Lost Cause, consider Richmond and the Valentine’s early role in disseminating the damaging Lost Cause myth and ultimately gain a deeper, more nuanced, more empathetic understanding of the region we call home.”

The Valentine will continue to solicit and address community questions, comments or concerns as the Studio Project develops.

On December 31st the Washington Post had an article on the museum taking a closer look at the role that founder of Edward V. Valentine had in the lost cause.

Today, the artist’s studio is closed to visitors at the Richmond museum that bears his family name — the Valentine. But museum director Martin and others see the workshop as the center of what could be a public reckoning with the racist mythology that Valentine’s sculptures helped bring to life.

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Bookbinder’s Brings you Mac & Cheese on Another Level with BIGWIFE’S Pop-Up

This isn’t your typical mom’s mac & cheese. If your mom makes mac & cheese like this we would like to be adopted.

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Old Original Bookbinder’s Seafood & Steakhouse has launched a new experimental pop-up concept focusing exclusively on macaroni and cheese. BIGWIFE’S Mac & Cheese is operating for delivery and carryout from the Bookbinder’s kitchen.

The inventive menu includes creative spins like Buffalo Mac with spicy chicken and gorgonzola cheese; Little Figgy Mac with goat cheese, ham and fig; Mac Lorraine with bacon, scallions, and gruyere; and Greek Wedding Mac with tomato, olive, artichokes, pepperoncini and feta. Any mac can be made gluten free.

Orders can be placed at https://www.bigwifesmac.com/ and via Grubhub. BIGWIFE’S is open Monday through Thursday from 5 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Old Original Bookbinder’s is located at 2306 E Cary Street, Richmond, VA 23223.

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