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Richmond Folk Festival, Spacebomb Records team up to release 15th anniversary compilation album

The new album, entitled “All Together Now,” captures 15 years of live performances at the festival.

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Richmond Folk Festival and Spacebomb Records today announce the release of the first single from a special compilation album celebrating the 15th anniversary of the Richmond Folk Festival. The record, titled “All Together Now”: 15 Years of the Richmond Folk Festival Live, includes select tracks recorded live over the years since the National Folk Festival first came to Richmond in 2005.

The full compilation album will be released on October 11, 2019, the first day of the Richmond Folk Festival. It will be available for purchase in multiple formats, including digital download, CD, standard black vinyl and even an orange and green tie-dye pressed vinyl collector’s edition. All proceeds from sales of the album will go directly to support the Richmond Folk Festival.

“We were absolutely floored when Spacebomb reached out to us about producing the album,” said Venture Richmond Director of Events Stephen Lecky. “I have had the pleasure of working with them on various events like TEDxRVA and Fall Line Fest, but this is totally different than anything we have done before. It’s been a thrilling experience throughout, but it’s also an incredibly daunting task to curate a shortlist of the incredible performances recorded at the Richmond Folk Festival over the years. We’re so grateful to our partners at the National Council of the Traditional Arts for their thoughtful guidance on the track selection.”

The record is a specially curated compilation that reflects the diversity of musical traditions presented at Richmond Folk Festival, which embraces cultural expressions from across the nation and the world. NCTA Artistic Director Julia Olin undertook the task of searching through more than 1,300 hours of archived recordings to identify potential selections. “I must have been crazy,” Olin said. “There were so many magical live performances that I couldn’t resist pulling over eight hours of material – even though only a fraction of it could be included in this project. It was incredibly hard to choose; we wanted to share it all.”

Richmond Folk Festival fans can download the single and pre-order the record now online or retailers including Plan 9, Deep Groove, Steady Sounds, 6131, and Small Fiend Records & Books.

CDs and standard black vinyl will be available for sale on-site at the festival’s merchandise tent.

“Richmond’s musical footprint is growing nationally and internationally and the Richmond Folk Festival is an important part of the city’s musical story,” Spacebomb Records CEO Ben Baldwin said. “We’re proud to be working with the Richmond Folk Festival to release an important musical document covering the first 15 years of the festival’s history.”

Listen to the first track below:

Artists on the special compilation album include:

  1. Clinton Fearon and the Boogie Brown Band – Feel the Spirit
  2. Lulo Reinhardt and Daniel Stelter – Swing 2012
  3. Maggie Ingram & The Ingramettes – Family Prayer
  4. Lunasa – Ryestraw (medley): The New Day March/Reystraw/An Old Woman Would
  5. Nathalie Pires – Loucura (Madness)
  6. The Holmes Brothers – Baby What You Want Me To Do
  7. Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band – Don’t Ask Me Why
  8. The Quebe Sisters – Speed the Plow Medley: Speed the Plow/The Maid Behind the Bar/Temerance Reel
  9. Altai Kai – My Native Land, Altai
  10. Mariachi Los Camperos de Nati Cano – México lindo/¡Viva México!
  11. Sona Jobarteh – Mamamuso
  12. Dale Watson and His Lonestars – Real Country Song/A Nashville Rash
  13. Rare Essence – Overnight Scenario
  14. BeauSoleil Trio – Le Sud de la Louisiane
  15. Sammy Shelor and Kirk Sutphin – Angeline the Baker
  16. Spanish Harlem Orchestra – Son de Corazón

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Library of Virginia Literary Awards Winners Announced

Cottom, Tilghman, and Kingsley are the 2020 recipients honored by the Library of Virginia.

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The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce the winners of the 23rd Annual Library of Virginia Literary Awards, which were held virtually this year. Sponsored by Dominion Energy, the October 17 awards celebration was hosted by best-selling author and award-winning filmmaker Adriana Trigiani. Awards categories were nonfiction, fiction, and poetry; People’s Choice Awards for fiction and nonfiction; and Art in Literature: The Mary Lynn Kotz Award. Winners in each category receive a monetary prize and a handsome engraved crystal book.

Tressie McMIllan Cottom Photo provided by Library of Virginia

The winner of the 2020 Literary Award for Nonfiction is Tressie McMIllan Cottom for her book Thick: And Other Essays.

“The provocative and brilliant chapters hold a mirror to the soul of America in painfully honest and gloriously affirming explorations of contemporary culture,” wrote the award judges. “Streetwise and erudite, Cottom explodes the myth that the ‘personal essay’ is the only genre in mainstream publishing and journalism open for public commentary by female writers of color.”

Cottom, who has just been named a 2020 MacArthur Fellow, is a recipient of the Doris Entwisle Award of the American Sociological Association for her scholarship on inequality, work, higher education, and technology. In addition to Thick, she is the author of Lower Ed and her work has been featured by the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Atlantic, PBS, NPR, Fresh Air, and The Daily Show, among others. She recently left Richmond, where she had been an associate professor of sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University, for a position at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

The other finalists for the nonfiction prize were Erik Nielson and Andrea L. Dennis for Rap on Trial: Race, Lyrics, and Guilt in America and Mary M. Lane for Hitler’s Last Hostages: Looted Art and the Soul of the Third Reich.

Chris Tilghman Photo Credit: Susan Kalergis

Christopher Tilghman won the 2020 Emyl Jenkins Sexton Literary Award for Fiction for his book Thomas and Beal in the Midi. “This lushly written novel follows an interracial American couple in a family saga after they emigrate to escape bigotry in 1892,” wrote the award judges. “Its evocative descriptions of fin de siècle France and skillfully drawn characters add up to a sensitive and satisfying portrait of a marriage.”

Tilghman is the author of two short-story collections, In a Father’s Place and The Way People Run, and three previous novels, Mason’s Retreat, The Right-Hand Shore, and Roads of the Heart. He is a professor of English at the University of Virginia and lives with his wife, the novelist Caroline Preston, in Charlottesville, Virginia, and in Centreville, Maryland.

The other finalists for the fiction award were Angie Kim for Miracle Creek and Tara Laskowski for One Night Gone.

Naka-Hasebe Kingsley Photo provided by Library of Virginia

Benjamín Naka-Hasebe Kingsley is the winner of the Poetry Award this year for his book Colonize Me, which explores the experience of living as a Native American in today’s America. “The poems emerge from overlapping histories of violence and struggle not as fractured identity but as integrated multiplicity” wrote the award judges. “Kingsley uses form and language to indict the micro and macro aggressions of colonization with irony, heartbreak, and joy.”

An Affrilachian author and Kundiman alum, Kingsley is a recipient of the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center and Tickner Fellowships. His is also the author of Not Your Mama’s Melting Pot (2018) and Dēmos (coming in 2021). He is an assistant professor of English in Old Dominion University’s MFA program.

The other finalists for the poetry award were Lauren K. Alleyne for Honeyfish and David Huddle for My Surly Heart.

Philip J. Deloria Photo Credit: Jim Harrison

The Art in Literature: The Mary Lynn Kotz Award went to Philip J. Deloria for his book Becoming Mary Sully: Toward an American Indian Abstract. In Becoming Mary Sully, Deloria reclaims the artist’s work from obscurity, exploring her stunning portfolio through the lenses of modernism, industrial design, Dakota women’s aesthetics, mental health, ethnography and anthropology, primitivism, and the American Indian politics of the 1930s. Presented by the Library and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Art in Literature Award recognizes an outstanding book published in the previous year that is written primarily in response to a work (or works) of art while also showing the highest literary quality as a creative or scholarly work. This unique award, established in 2013, is named in honor of Mary Lynn Kotz, author of the award-winning biography Rauschenberg: Art and Life.

The winners of the People’s Choice Awards are The Substitution Order by Martin Clark in the fiction category and Mary Ball Washington: The Untold Story of George Washington’s Mother by Craig Shirley in the nonfiction category. Winners are chosen by online voting.

“The Substitution Order mixes legal expertise and wry humor in a story rich with atmosphere, memorable characters, and surprises right up to the end,” wrote the judges about the novel by Martin Clark, who is a circuit court judge in Patrick County, Virginia.

“Craig Shirley’s sprightly biography suggests that George Washington’s first fight for independence was from his controlling, singular mother—a resilient widow who singlehandedly raised six children on a large farm,” wrote the judges about Mary Ball Washington. Shirley is an author and public affairs consultant who splits his time between homes on the Rappahannock River in Lancaster County and a 300-year-old Georgian manor house in Tappahannock, Virginia.

The evening’s featured speaker was Douglas Brinkley, who was honored for his outstanding contributions to American history and literature as an award-winning, best-selling author and U.S. presidential historian. In addition to our presenting sponsor, Dominion Energy, the Literary Awards were made possible by Liz and Preston Bryant Jr., Christian & Barton LLP, MercerTrigiani, Anna Moser and Peter Schwartz, Kathy and Steve Rogers, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Carole and Marcus Weinstein, Weinstein Properties, and the Library of Virginia Foundation.

Next year’s Library of Virginia Literary Awards Celebration will be held on October 16, 2021.

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Virginia Museum of Fine Arts acquires 19th-century work by Cheyenne artist Howling Wolf

The purchase breaks the world record price for a Native American ledger drawing.

RVAHub Staff

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The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) announced today that it acquired a major work by a 19th-century Native American artist Honanistto or Howling Wolf. The acquisition entitled A Southern Cheyenne Ledger Drawing is a watercolor and ink drawing dating to circa 1875. Howling Wolf’s long life, circa 1849 to 1927, spanned the most tumultuous periods in the history of the Southern Cheyenne (Chian) people. He was an exceptionally talented artist who depicted the Plains people and documented significant events and changes in Cheyenne society, while also portraying an individual’s place within this volatile period of American history. The work is the first Native American ledger drawing to enter VMFA’s collection. An original and rare stereograph portrait of the artist was also acquired by the museum.

VMFA’s growing Native American art collection includes two- and three-dimensional works dating from prehistoric times to the present day. Compelling artwork by modern and contemporary artists such as Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Salish/Kootinai), Troy Sice (Zuni), Wendy Red Star (Crow), Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo), Eudora Montoya (Santa Ana Pueblo) and Holly Wilson (Delaware/Cherokee) as well as the beautiful and intricate objects by unnamed aboriginal artists from the Arctic North, Northwest Coast, Plains and Southwest regions provide testament to the skill and aesthetic care of their makers.

“VMFA continues its efforts to grow this important collection—the museum has acquired more than 200 works by Native American artists within the last five years alone,” said Alex Nyerges, VMFA’s Director and CEO. “We are committed to collecting and exhibiting Native American art and recognizing the contributions of the Native communities here in Virginia. Adding Howling Wolf’s drawing to the collection enables the museum to tell his fascinating story and document the history and artistry of the Cheyenne people.”

Howling Wolf was the son of Eagle Head, a successful warrior and leader who became a council chief of the Southern Cheyenne around 1874. Both father and son were members of the Bowstring Society, the strongest warfare group within Southern Cheyenne society in the 1870s. Howling Wolf and his father survived several clashes, one of the earliest was an attack on their encampment at Sands Creek by the Colorado Militia in 1864 when he was only fifteen years old. By the time of his death Howling Wolf was both a revered warrior and one of the most recognized masters of the Native American art form of ledger drawing.

A Southern Cheyenne Ledger Drawing was acquired by VMFA at Heritage Auctions in Dallas, Texas. Michael Taylor, VMFA’s Chief Curator and Deputy Director for Art and Education, successfully acquired the work for the museum for $106,250 after a vigorous bidding war resulting in a world-record hammer price for a single ledger drawing. “Ledger drawings are important to the history of Native North America both as an art form and as historical documents,” said Dr. Johanna Minich, VMFA’s Assistant Curator for Native American Art. “Acquiring a ledger drawing for the Native American collection has been one of my priorities. When this work by Howling Wolf came up for auction Michael Taylor and I discussed it and decided that if we wanted a ledger drawing for VMFA we should do what we could to obtain one of the best. I think we got it.”

Ledger art grew from the traditions of visually recording individual exploits and tribal histories as testimonials. Pre-reservation ledger drawings emphasized battle scenes or horse raids. Reservation drawings dating from around 1870 to 1890 documented tribal histories and traditions. In 1875 the War Department acted to remove men they deemed “criminal offenders” in battles from their own people and send them far away to Fort Marion, a prison in Saint Augustine, Florida. Howling Wolf and his father were among the seventy-two men from Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Arapaho and Caddo tribes who were forcibly removed. A Southern Cheyenne Ledger Drawing is a reservation drawing made during his captivity.

While at Fort Marion the men, surprisingly, could move freely about, work for wages and pursue artistic endeavors. With access to new materials like paper, watercolor paints, crayons and ink, Howling Wolf began to vary his themes and compositions and the resulting art demonstrates his powerful individualism.

A Southern Cheyenne Ledger Drawing depicts a meeting of the Bowstring Society with its leaders arriving on horseback. The chief, a famous Cheyenne warrior named Roman Nose, is shown with an elaborate headdress featuring a bird design. Intricately detailed tipis flank the sides of the composition with one placed in the foreground to suggest their circular formation around the main activity. Seven other society members, with their backs to the viewer, bear feathered and bent lances indicating their membership in the Bowstring Society. The inclusion of the American flag indicates that even though this warrior society continues the members have acquiesced to the new leadership of the colonizers.

“The composition is so bold and complex,” said Taylor. “The outline is firm and confident and the colors are vibrant and exuberant. We knew we had found an incredible Native American ledger drawing for VMFA and are delighted to share it with our visitors. Our goal in the coming years is to build a world-class collection of Native American art at the museum and this purchase, along with many others that Johanna has made in the past five years, signals our intent.”

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Flower Delivery by GWAR’s JiZMak Da Gusha is Terrifyingly Awesome

Nicola Flora has for a limited time a special delivery person (delivery demon, delivery thing).

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Originally spotted on rva/Reddit is the news that will be sure to brighten that special someone in your life. Sure it will cost you $100 bucks but how many people in this world can say they got flowers from a dog-headed drummer?

ATTENTION SCUMDOGS OF RICHMOND!!!!

Has your quarantine been as pitiful and pathetic as your meaningless existence?

If so, then we have just the thing to add some much-needed excitement (and possibly some terror) to your day!

For a limited time only, GWAR’s infamous dog-headed drummer JiZMak Da Gusha is delivering flowers on behalf of Nicola Flora. (He really needs the money.)

This special delivery service starts at $100 and includes a designer’s choice floral arrangement, delivery and photos with JiZMak.

Please include any messages you would like JiZMak to yell at your unfortunate flower victim on your behalf.

Place your order here.

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